Controlling lily pads on a large pond

Discussion in 'Pond Archive' started by Chris Barnes, Jul 21, 2008.

  1. Chris Barnes

    Chris Barnes Guest

    I have a fairly large pond (tear drop shapped - 150 yards x 75 yards)
    which seems to be taken over by aquatic plants - mostly lily pads &
    hydrilla.


    What are some of the better ways of controlling the plants, without
    bothering the fish, birds, and other wildlife that use the pond? I have
    been told that most people use "Roundup", but that just doesn't sound
    very safe to me....

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    Chris Barnes AOL IM: CNBarnes
    Yahoo IM: chrisnbarnes
    "Usenet really is all about standing around and hitting the ground
    with clubs, on a spot where many years earlier a dead horse lay."
     
    Chris Barnes, Jul 21, 2008
    #1
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  2. Chris Barnes

    kathy Guest

    kathy, Jul 21, 2008
    #2
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  3. Chris Barnes

    ~ jan Guest

    On Mon, 21 Jul 2008 11:50:13 EDT, Chris Barnes wrote:

    >I have a fairly large pond (tear drop shapped - 150 yards x 75 yards)
    >which seems to be taken over by aquatic plants - mostly lily pads &
    >hydrilla.
    >
    >
    >What are some of the better ways of controlling the plants, without
    >bothering the fish, birds, and other wildlife that use the pond? I have
    >been told that most people use "Roundup", but that just doesn't sound
    >very safe to me....


    I bet it is nice and clear.

    That size pond, perhaps a paddle-wheeled harvester?

    I know there are water plant pesticides (not roundup) but if they didn't
    out right kill the plants, they should would make them look sickly and
    parts would die and decompose.... and there goes the clear water. Perhaps
    you could hire some kids to hand harvest, clearing some areas? ~ jan
    ------------
    Zone 7a, SE Washington State
    Ponds: www.jjspond.us
     
    ~ jan, Jul 21, 2008
    #3
  4. Chris Barnes

    Reel McKoi Guest

    "Chris Barnes" wrote in message
    news:g62828$umi$...
    >I have a fairly large pond (tear drop shapped - 150 yards x 75 yards) which
    >seems to be taken over by aquatic plants - mostly lily pads & hydrilla.
    >
    >
    > What are some of the better ways of controlling the plants, without
    > bothering the fish, birds, and other wildlife that use the pond? I have
    > been told that most people use "Roundup", but that just doesn't sound very
    > safe to me....

    ============================
    I wouldn't use Roundup. You're sure to kill a lot more than unwanted plants.
    How about getting some exercise and fresh air by hand harvesting the
    unwanted vegetation and composting it? Or give it to a gardener to compost.
    :)
    --
    RM....
    Frugal ponding since 1995.
    rec.ponder since late 1996.
    Zone 6. Middle TN USA
    ~~~~ } ~~~ }
     
    Reel McKoi, Jul 22, 2008
    #4
  5. Chris Barnes

    Chris Barnes Guest

    kathy wrote:
    > This article
    > http://ohioline.osu.edu/a-fact/0004.html
    > looks like a good place to start.



    That was beautiful. That might be the only resource I need.
    Thanks!

    --

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    Chris Barnes AOL IM: CNBarnes
    Yahoo IM: chrisnbarnes
    "Usenet really is all about standing around and hitting the ground
    with clubs, on a spot where many years earlier a dead horse lay."
     
    Chris Barnes, Jul 22, 2008
    #5
  6. Chris Barnes

    Chris Barnes Guest

    ~ jan wrote:
    > On Mon, 21 Jul 2008 11:50:13 EDT, Chris Barnes wrote:
    >
    >> I have a fairly large pond (tear drop shapped - 150 yards x 75 yards)
    >> which seems to be taken over by aquatic plants - mostly lily pads &
    >> hydrilla.
    >>
    >>
    >> What are some of the better ways of controlling the plants, without
    >> bothering the fish, birds, and other wildlife that use the pond? I have
    >> been told that most people use "Roundup", but that just doesn't sound
    >> very safe to me....

    >
    > I bet it is nice and clear.


    Um, no. In my part of the state, there are NO ponds that are clear.
    The soil has way too much clay that stays in suspension all year round.
    Plus the pond gets too much runoff so there is a good layer of gooey mud
    about 6"-12" thick (probably one reason why the plants grow so well...).


    Now if we lived 100 miles west, in the Texas hill country, the bottom of
    the ponds would be solid rock. THOSE ponds can be clear (people
    actually dive at Lake Travis outside of Austin, down to about 30').

    > I know there are water plant pesticides (not roundup) but if they didn't
    > out right kill the plants, they should would make them look sickly and
    > parts would die and decompose.... and there goes the clear water. Perhaps
    > you could hire some kids to hand harvest, clearing some areas? ~ jan


    Well... it would be long, back breaking work. I would know because I
    walked across part of the pond this past weekend. Just walking through
    the mud & weed mixture was pretty exhausting. Just fyi - I took a 8'
    "cattle panel" (heavy gauge wire fence) and used my tractor to drag it
    across the pond. It helped clear out some of the hydrilla, but 30
    minutes later you couldn't even tell the path I used through the
    lilypads (they simply "re-engulfed" the path).

    I suspect it would take a crew of 30 high-school/college aged kids a
    good 10-12 hours to make a noticable dent. That's what - 300+
    man-hours? Not sure I could afford that, even paying "kid wages"....


    Oh, and since it was 100 yesterday, the water isn't exactly "cool". :-O

    Which also answer's Reel's comment (I garden myself, but the compost
    material wouldn't be worth the effort).

    --

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    Chris Barnes AOL IM: CNBarnes
    Yahoo IM: chrisnbarnes
    "Usenet really is all about standing around and hitting the ground
    with clubs, on a spot where many years earlier a dead horse lay."
     
    Chris Barnes, Jul 22, 2008
    #6
  7. Chris Barnes

    kirscp

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2008
    Messages:
    238
    I've know people to use roundup in a lake setting. Lilly pads don't like moving water.


    If you want to use a tractor, you would need come type of a claw drag, to pull up their root structure. You'd be looking at a couple of years to clear a path though. I don't know if roundup will kill off the lilly pads, or just the surface growth. There are some sinking pellets, that may kill the root structure.

    I don't think most understand what you are trying to do. My parents have a lake cabin with a lot of lilly pads in front. Took years to get a 50 foot path cleared out, and that included driving in and out with the boats, pontoon, jetskis, and paddle boats. You really need to get at their root structure, we spent many years just pulling out roots. They will get to be 3 - 4" in diameter, so they are a pain!

    They also don't like moving water, so if you can get some movement, they wouldn't come back, or it would at least slow them down.

    Good luck.
     
    kirscp, Jul 23, 2008
    #7
  8. Chris,

    Your description makes it clear that mechanical would be very hard!
    Have you any pics of the pond?

    Jim
     
    Phyllis and Jim, Jul 23, 2008
    #8
  9. Chris Barnes

    Chris Barnes Guest

    Phyllis and Jim wrote:
    > Your description makes it clear that mechanical would be very hard!
    > Have you any pics of the pond?


    I'll take some tonight. :)


    --

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    Chris Barnes AOL IM: CNBarnes
    Yahoo IM: chrisnbarnes
    "Usenet really is all about standing around and hitting the ground
    with clubs, on a spot where many years earlier a dead horse lay."
     
    Chris Barnes, Jul 23, 2008
    #9
  10. Chris Barnes

    ~ jan Guest

    On Tue, 22 Jul 2008 14:33:34 EDT, Chris Barnes wrote:

    >Um, no. In my part of the state, there are NO ponds that are clear.
    >The soil has way too much clay that stays in suspension all year round.
    >Plus the pond gets too much runoff so there is a good layer of gooey mud
    >about 6"-12" thick (probably one reason why the plants grow so well...).
    >
    >Now if we lived 100 miles west, in the Texas hill country, the bottom of
    >the ponds would be solid rock. THOSE ponds can be clear (people
    >actually dive at Lake Travis outside of Austin, down to about 30').
    >
    >Well... it would be long, back breaking work. I would know because I
    >walked across part of the pond this past weekend. Just walking through
    >the mud & weed mixture was pretty exhausting. Just fyi - I took a 8'
    >"cattle panel" (heavy gauge wire fence) and used my tractor to drag it
    >across the pond. It helped clear out some of the hydrilla, but 30
    >minutes later you couldn't even tell the path I used through the
    >lilypads (they simply "re-engulfed" the path).
    >
    >I suspect it would take a crew of 30 high-school/college aged kids a
    >good 10-12 hours to make a noticable dent. That's what - 300+
    >man-hours? Not sure I could afford that, even paying "kid wages"....
    >
    >Oh, and since it was 100 yesterday, the water isn't exactly "cool". :-O


    Dang, that a large pond could be that full of plants and neither clear nor
    cool. I'm surprised you walked thru it.... or would want to. I hate water
    weeds touching my legs, perhaps you used waders? (Doing my best to uncreep
    myself out.)

    I just skimmed the resource kathy gave, so do tell what did you do and how
    well it worked when you get to that point. ~ jan
    ------------
    Zone 7a, SE Washington State
    Ponds: www.jjspond.us
     
    ~ jan, Jul 23, 2008
    #10
  11. Chris Barnes

    Chris Barnes Guest

    ~ jan wrote:
    > Dang, that a large pond could be that full of plants and neither clear nor
    > cool. I'm surprised you walked thru it.... or would want to. I hate water
    > weeds touching my legs, perhaps you used waders?


    I only walked through it once...
    A person does not wear waders in Texas in the summer (even light ones)
    unless they want to die of heat stroke! :-O


    > I just skimmed the resource kathy gave, so do tell what did you do and how
    > well it worked when you get to that point. ~ jan


    I'll have to drop by our local co-op with the list of herbicides printed
    out to see what is available (that I can buy without a license).


    --

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    Chris Barnes AOL IM: CNBarnes
    Yahoo IM: chrisnbarnes
    "Usenet really is all about standing around and hitting the ground
    with clubs, on a spot where many years earlier a dead horse lay."
     
    Chris Barnes, Jul 24, 2008
    #11
  12. Chris Barnes

    Chris Barnes Guest

    Here are some pictures of the pond

    http://www.txbarnes.com/land/Phase2/




    --

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    Chris Barnes AOL IM: CNBarnes
    Yahoo IM: chrisnbarnes
    "Usenet really is all about standing around and hitting the ground
    with clubs, on a spot where many years earlier a dead horse lay."
     
    Chris Barnes, Jul 25, 2008
    #12
  13. Chris Barnes

    kathy Guest

    Oh, WOW!
    I seriously covet your pond!!!

    k :)
     
    kathy, Jul 25, 2008
    #13
  14. Chris Barnes

    Chris Barnes Guest

    kathy wrote:
    > Oh, WOW!
    > I seriously covet your pond!!!



    Technically it's not mine. It's on the adjacent property owned by the
    municipal airport next door (only small private planes - not annoying at
    all, in fact, they're kind of cool - especially when the skydivers are
    going). But we have permission to use the property pretty much as we
    see fit (I dove hunt on it - right in line with the path the planes take
    to land/takeoff).

    The pond is approximately 80 yards from our property line. :)



    I am digging a pond of my own on the other side of our house. When
    completed it should be roughly rectangular about 150'x75' and 30' deep
    (if I can). We plan on putting in a water well with a pump strong
    enough to keep it filled all summer long.

    --

    + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
    Chris Barnes AOL IM: CNBarnes
    Yahoo IM: chrisnbarnes
    "Usenet really is all about standing around and hitting the ground
    with clubs, on a spot where many years earlier a dead horse lay."
     
    Chris Barnes, Jul 25, 2008
    #14
  15. Around here that would be thought of as a small lake!

    Jim
     
    Phyllis and Jim, Jul 25, 2008
    #15
  16. Chris Barnes

    ~ jan Guest

    On Thu, 24 Jul 2008 20:40:29 EDT, Chris Barnes wrote:

    >Here are some pictures of the pond
    >
    >http://www.txbarnes.com/land/Phase2/


    Ahmazing.

    What are your plans with the pond you're digging? ~ jan
    ------------
    Zone 7a, SE Washington State
    Ponds: www.jjspond.us
     
    ~ jan, Jul 25, 2008
    #16
  17. Chris Barnes

    DrCase Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    Messages:
    4,031
    Location:
    Arkansas
    are you going to put lilies in your new pond ???on your hunting pond, take your boat,with a giant hook and drag the bottom.
     
    DrCase, Jul 25, 2008
    #17
  18. Chris Barnes

    Chip Guest

    Chris Barnes wrote:

    > I am digging a pond of my own on the other side of our house. When
    > completed it should be roughly rectangular about 150'x75' and 30' deep
    > (if I can).
    >

    What do plan on putting in it? Killer whales? Dolphins?

    Chip
     
    Chip, Jul 26, 2008
    #18
  19. Chris Barnes

    Chris Barnes Guest

    ~ jan wrote:
    > What are your plans with the pond you're digging? ~ jan


    Place for my labs to play, pet ducks, pet Canada geese, fish for the
    grandkids to catch.



    note: none of my 3 daughters even have serious boyfriends yet ;-)

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    Chris Barnes AOL IM: CNBarnes
    Yahoo IM: chrisnbarnes
    "Usenet really is all about standing around and hitting the ground
    with clubs, on a spot where many years earlier a dead horse lay."
     
    Chris Barnes, Jul 28, 2008
    #19
  20. Chris Barnes

    Chris Barnes Guest

    Chip wrote:
    > Chris Barnes wrote:
    >
    >> I am digging a pond of my own on the other side of our house. When
    >> completed it should be roughly rectangular about 150'x75' and 30' deep
    >> (if I can).
    >>

    > What do plan on putting in it? Killer whales? Dolphins?



    Things ARE bigger in Texas. :)


    --

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    Chris Barnes AOL IM: CNBarnes
    Yahoo IM: chrisnbarnes
    "Usenet really is all about standing around and hitting the ground
    with clubs, on a spot where many years earlier a dead horse lay."
     
    Chris Barnes, Jul 28, 2008
    #20
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