Overwintering water lettuce/hyacinth

Discussion in 'Pond Archive' started by Peter, Sep 15, 2009.

  1. Peter

    Peter Guest

    Hi Guys,
    I've been growing water lettuce and less successfully water hyacinth
    this summer, and since its getting cold I decided to hell with most of
    the advice on the internet I am going to try and overwinter some.
    I have set up deep storage container half filled water, with a red/blue
    led growlight in front of sunny patio door.
    I wondered if anyone had any further advice, tales of success and failure.
    Peter
    Peter, Sep 15, 2009
    #1
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  2. Peter

    ReelMcKoi Guest

    "Peter" wrote in message
    news:VaRrm.76424$2...
    > Hi Guys,
    > I've been growing water lettuce and less successfully water hyacinth th

    is
    > summer, and since its getting cold I decided to hell with most of the
    > advice on the internet I am going to try and overwinter some.
    > I have set up deep storage container half filled water, with a red/blue


    > led growlight in front of sunny patio door.
    > I wondered if anyone had any further advice, tales of success and failu

    re.
    > Peter
    >

    ===========================
    I was never successful, except one time, in keeping over water hyacinth.
    The
    water lettuce winters over fine in the greenhouse or a well lit aquarium
    with
    some water movement. Don't forget to fertilize them a few times a month.
    I use Peter's and Miracle Grow.
    --
    RM....
    Frugal ponding since 1995.
    rec.ponder since late 1996.
    Zone 6. Middle TN USA
    ~~~~ } ~~~ }
    ReelMcKoi, Sep 17, 2009
    #2
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  3. Peter

    ~ jan Guest

    On Tue, 15 Sep 2009 16:53:48 EDT, Peter wrote:

    >Hi Guys,
    >I've been growing water lettuce and less successfully water hyacinth
    >this summer, and since its getting cold I decided to hell with most of
    >the advice on the internet I am going to try and overwinter some.
    >I have set up deep storage container half filled water, with a red/blue
    >led growlight in front of sunny patio door.
    >I wondered if anyone had any further advice, tales of success and failure.
    >Peter


    The time I tried the water lettuce they just slowly got smaller and smaller
    till they were no more. The WH, otoh, did best for me when the roots were
    in contact with soil, I lost a lot but had enough come spring to start anew
    that year, but they sure looked crappy in the house. I found bugs were the
    worst problem, spider mites in particular that you can't see and the
    over-wintering eggs hatch around March, eat them up.

    If I were to do it again, I'd tent them and have a pest strip in the tent.
    Killing those dang hidden bugs. That's my plan when I pull the taros out of
    the pond this year, while they're sitting on the patio, protected from any
    unexpected frost I'm tenting them with plastic and putting a pest strip in
    there. What I don't know is if those things are effective against eggs that
    might not hatch till March? Regardless, I'll get all the dang egg laying
    adults before they come in the house and multiply w/o predators to eat
    them. ~ jan
    ------------
    Zone 7a, SE Washington State
    Ponds: www.jjspond.us
    ~ jan, Sep 20, 2009
    #3
  4. Peter

    Jim Hurley Guest

    No-pest strip in a tent is brilliant!

    Jim
    Jim Hurley, Sep 24, 2009
    #4
  5. On Wed, 23 Sep 2009 21:56:04 EDT, Jim Hurley
    wrote:

    >No-pest strip in a tent is brilliant!
    >
    >Jim


    I tried to find what this was in response to, but couldn't figure it
    out, so if I'm off base here I'm sorry. A conventional no-pest strip
    in a tent is not a good idea, and here's why. No-pest strips give off
    a constant (albeit low dose) vapor of toxic fumes or "pesticides,"
    which is how they work. It is not a good idea to use these strips in
    any area occupied by humans or animals (and quite probably most
    plants). My wife and I researched this when we were living in Maui
    and thought a "no-pest" type strip would be just the thing for our
    (door less) outhouse -- it wasn't.
    Galen Hekhuis, Sep 25, 2009
    #5
  6. Peter

    ~ jan Guest

    On Fri, 25 Sep 2009 07:33:38 EDT, Galen Hekhuis
    wrote:

    >I tried to find what this was in response to, but couldn't figure it
    >out, so if I'm off base here I'm sorry. A conventional no-pest strip
    >in a tent is not a good idea, and here's why. No-pest strips give off
    >a constant (albeit low dose) vapor of toxic fumes or "pesticides,"
    >which is how they work. It is not a good idea to use these strips in
    >any area occupied by humans or animals (and quite probably most
    >plants). My wife and I researched this when we were living in Maui
    >and thought a "no-pest" type strip would be just the thing for our
    >(door less) outhouse -- it wasn't.


    The pest strip is in a plastic tent outside. I used it this spring on my
    hibiscus tree that got white fly, and in the living room when the taro came
    down with aphids, this keeps the flumes encased. Though when I took the
    tent off I'm sure we were somewhat exposed till the room cleared of the
    residual left behind. Didn't bother the plants at all, of course I wouldn't
    do this if I had fish in the stock tank or patio pond.

    The hibiscus had white fly so bad, I was hoping moving it outside would
    blow them away. What it did was infect my whole yard. The hibiscus
    continued to produce them and looked very sick. Tented it with strip and it
    killed them all, 2 weeks apparently wasn't long enough as they started to
    come back, so I used these new potted plant tabs with the long acting
    systemic and that did them in finally. Course their kin by that time had
    moved to the grass... and then found the tomatoes and cucumbers. Even using
    harvest spray (like Safer's soap) didn't knock down the numbers. I still
    got enough produce, but I wasn't sorry to see the freeze last night do them
    all in! ~ jan
    ------------
    Zone 7a, SE Washington State
    Ponds: www.jjspond.us
    ~ jan, Oct 11, 2009
    #6
  7. On Sun, 11 Oct 2009 18:58:24 EDT, ~ jan wrote:

    >The pest strip is in a plastic tent outside. I used it this spring on my
    >hibiscus tree that got white fly, and in the living room when the taro came
    >down with aphids, this keeps the flumes encased. Though when I took the
    >tent off I'm sure we were somewhat exposed till the room cleared of the
    >residual left behind. Didn't bother the plants at all, of course I wouldn't
    >do this if I had fish in the stock tank or patio pond.
    >
    >The hibiscus had white fly so bad, I was hoping moving it outside would
    >blow them away. What it did was infect my whole yard. The hibiscus
    >continued to produce them and looked very sick. Tented it with strip and it
    >killed them all, 2 weeks apparently wasn't long enough as they started to
    >come back, so I used these new potted plant tabs with the long acting
    >systemic and that did them in finally. Course their kin by that time had
    >moved to the grass... and then found the tomatoes and cucumbers. Even using
    >harvest spray (like Safer's soap) didn't knock down the numbers. I still
    >got enough produce, but I wasn't sorry to see the freeze last night do them
    >all in! ~ jan
    >------------
    >Zone 7a, SE Washington State
    >Ponds: www.jjspond.us


    Wow! Those are some persistent white flies. I control the ones I get
    with an assortment of carnivorous plants I get from Logees.com. I get
    butterworts, pitcher plants and sundews from them. I have some plants
    that stay inside under grow lights year 'round. I used to get
    predatory mites (they work good on spider mites) but the things are
    just too darned expensive and when they do their job, they eat up all
    their food and starve to death. The carnivorous plants eventually die
    too, but I hope it's because they get too rich a diet from too many
    bugs to eat (they bloom a lot, then seem sort of "overfed") and not
    due to my (admittedly poor) care. The other thing I use is an
    oscillating tower fan I got at Wal Mart. It has a "breeze" setting
    where the fan oscillates, but only blows now and again, seemingly at
    random. I set it in front of my plants for only a few hours each day.
    It seems to disrupt the feeding cycle, the reproductive cycle, or
    perhaps their sleep cycle, I don't know, but since I have been using
    the fan I have been able to both prevent and cure infestations of
    several types of critter. Oh yeah, I also use a "mist" type sprayer
    device twice weekly.

    Outside, the critters don't stand a chance. Considering the lizards
    and frogs and praying mantises and stuff it must be tough just being a
    bug here. And there is no relief in the air, either. I've got more
    dragonflies than you can shake a stick at (by the way, just how many
    dragonflies can you shake a stick at anyway?). I've talked about how
    dragonflies will follow me around when I'm mowing with my tractor, but
    I never realized how many there were around here 'till I started work
    on the cabin by the back pond. I figured a swampy pond in northern
    Florida would be just the ticket for mosquito infestation. I got
    screening, bug repellant, etc. Turned out there was no need. I have
    zero, I mean ZERO, mosquitoes down there. I didn't need any bug
    repellant, and I didn't bother with the screens (except the ones that
    came with the sliding glass doors, but that was just recently). What
    I do have down there are oodles of dragonflies, and scads of
    damselflies, though the damselflies are smaller and you don't notice
    them at first. It isn't quite like clouds of dragonflies obscure the
    sun, or even make it difficult to see across the pond, but there are,
    quite literally, hundreds in sight at any given moment. They fly into
    the cabin, fly around and check it out, and then fly out. They love
    to fly in through the sliding door on the side and then out through
    one of the ends of the cabin. They will alight on the floor, even on
    my shoe. They seem to understand that while I'm a big critter, I pose
    no threat to them and they're almost friendly. Of course I get some
    enjoyment in pretending I have squadrons of fighter bugs to protect me
    from those mean, nasty mosquitoes. Besides, they are incredible stunt
    fliers: I have spent hours with binoculars just watching them fly,
    and they never crash.
    Galen Hekhuis, Oct 12, 2009
    #7
  8. Peter

    ReelMcKoi Guest

    "~ jan" wrote in message
    news:...
    > The hibiscus had white fly so bad, I was hoping moving it outside would
    > blow them away. What it did was infect my whole yard. The hibiscus
    > continued to produce them and looked very sick. Tented it with strip and
    > it
    > killed them all, 2 weeks apparently wasn't long enough as they started to
    > come back, so I used these new potted plant tabs with the long acting
    > systemic and that did them in finally. Course their kin by that time had
    > moved to the grass... and then found the tomatoes and cucumbers. Even
    > using
    > harvest spray (like Safer's soap) didn't knock down the numbers. I still
    > got enough produce, but I wasn't sorry to see the freeze last night do
    > them
    > all in! ~ jan
    > ------------
    > Zone 7a, SE Washington State
    > Ponds: www.jjspond.us
    >

    ==========================

    I had a bad whitefly infestation on poinsettias in my greenhouse last
    winter.
    Spray systemic didn't work, no sprays did. Research shows they're immune
    to most insecticides now. Those No Pest strips made a real difference along
    with 2 bug Bombs from Lowe's. The GH is 8.5 X 16.5' in size. It took 3
    bombings but it knocked them back at least 99%. Once they infest your
    property
    you can expect them back every spring. Sure enough, they were back in
    the spring. :-(

    We're waiting for the first good frost to kill them outside, then we'll bomb
    the GH.
    --
    Kelly..........
    If you're a past or present resident of
    NYC and want to share past experiences
    and current events with others from NYC,
    check out this free message Board:
    http://members6.boardhost.com/QueensNYer/
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ReelMcKoi, Oct 16, 2009
    #8
  9. Peter

    ~ jan Guest

    On Fri, 16 Oct 2009 08:31:59 EDT, "ReelMcKoi" wrote:

    >I had a bad whitefly infestation on poinsettias in my greenhouse last
    >winter.
    >Spray systemic didn't work, no sprays did. Research shows they're immune
    >to most insecticides now. Those No Pest strips made a real difference along
    >with 2 bug Bombs from Lowe's. The GH is 8.5 X 16.5' in size. It took 3
    >bombings but it knocked them back at least 99%. Once they infest your
    >property
    >you can expect them back every spring. Sure enough, they were back in
    >the spring. :-(


    What zone are you in?

    I've only had them once before outside a few years ago. I can only hope our
    winter is cold enough, long enough to kill any eggs. It was interesting how
    they liked the warmer zone stuff, what we call annuals here, and stayed off
    anything perennial (other than being in the grass for a week or so). Since
    I toss annuals after frost hopefully any surviving eggs will go with them.
    ~ jan
    ------------
    Zone 7a, SE Washington State
    Ponds: www.jjspond.us
    ~ jan, Oct 19, 2009
    #9
  10. Peter

    ReelMcKoi Guest

    "~ jan" wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 16 Oct 2009 08:31:59 EDT, "ReelMcKoi" wrote:
    >
    >>I had a bad whitefly infestation on poinsettias in my greenhouse last
    >>winter.
    >>Spray systemic didn't work, no sprays did. Research shows they're immun

    e
    >>to most insecticides now. Those No Pest strips made a real difference
    >>along
    >>with 2 bug Bombs from Lowe's. The GH is 8.5 X 16.5' in size. It took 3
    >>bombings but it knocked them back at least 99%. Once they infest your
    >>property
    >>you can expect them back every spring. Sure enough, they were back in
    >>the spring. :-(

    >
    > What zone are you in?


    I'm in zone 6 but they winter over I know as far north as zone 5.

    >
    > I've only had them once before outside a few years ago. I can only hope


    > our
    > winter is cold enough, long enough to kill any eggs. It was interesting


    > how
    > they liked the warmer zone stuff, what we call annuals here, and stayed


    > off
    > anything perennial (other than being in the grass for a week or so). Si

    nce
    > I toss annuals after frost hopefully any surviving eggs will go with th

    em.

    It's better to burn them or bury them deep if you can. Or if that's not
    possible, bag them
    for trash pickup. Here they infested even the dandelions and native shru
    bs
    they were so bad
    one year.



    --
    RM....
    Frugal ponding since 1995.
    rec.ponder since late 1996.
    Zone 6. Middle TN USA
    ~~~~ } ~~~ }
    ReelMcKoi, Oct 25, 2009
    #10
  11. Peter

    Peter Guest

    Despite the best efforts of aphids of various kinds, the water lettuce,
    reasonably sucessfully survived the winter. The water hyacinth clung on
    too. We have had a couple of hottish days for the area, so I have
    decided to transfer all the survivors outside to the pond.
    Whether the expense and bother was worth it, is debatable, but it is doable.
    Peter

    Peter wrote:
    > Hi Guys,
    > I've been growing water lettuce and less successfully water hyacinth
    > this summer, and since its getting cold I decided to hell with most of
    > the advice on the internet I am going to try and overwinter some.
    > I have set up deep storage container half filled water, with a red/blue
    > led growlight in front of sunny patio door.
    > I wondered if anyone had any further advice, tales of success and failure.
    > Peter
    >
    Peter, May 22, 2010
    #11
  12. Congratulations! We never succeeded inside. Our outside hyacinth
    take a nasty hit, but if even one survives, we are golden.

    Jim
    Phyllis and Jim, May 23, 2010
    #12
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