Adding water in the winter - chlorine?

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I've seen a lot of comments that address trickling water in if you need to add it in the winter to keep the temperature from changing to quickly - but when adding water from a hose, how do you prevent chlorine poison? Can you add the water and the dechlorinator at the same time? Can the fish tolerate a short exposure to chlorine, or must it be removed before the water is added to pond?
 
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about 500 gallons - 9 foot diameter, 12 inches deep on average (one pocket that is 18 inches)
 
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Generally speaking, a slow trickle of water is not a concern for chlorine. However, your pond is relatively small, so I would always treat with dechlor just to be on the safe side. You can add all the dechlor at once.
 

mrsclem

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Our city water is very high in chlorine, smells like bleach! I use a dry dechlorinator, just put it in next to hose when I start water.
 
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Yep, I distribute it in the turbulence of water being added. You don't need to premix it in buckets.
I have a metering device that screws onto the end of my hose. I use it so I'm not guessing the water to dechlorinizer ratio. I bought it on Amazon and it was very inexpensive.
So for example, as the hose is running, I might throw in enough dechlorinizer to treat 100 gallons. When the water meter shows 100 gallons, I know I'm good. If the pond needs more water, I'll throw in maybe enough dechlorinizer to do 50 gallons. Then watch the meter. Etc...
 
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I use Prime for my water changes (or adding water) I add it right before I start the hose. The amount you use should be enough to treat the entire volume of water in your pond.

My pond is also small, just a bit over 500 gallons. I use 6 capfulls of pond prime which is enough to treat 600 gallons.


These are the directions from Seachem website. Just to verify that total volume should be treated and not just amount of water being added. This is for regular Prime which can be used for a small pond but dosing will be different as it's not as concentrated as the Pond Prime.

Use 1 capful (5 mL) for each 200 L (50 US gallons) of new water. For smaller volumes, please note each cap thread is approximately 1 mL. May be added to aquarium directly, but better if added to new water first. If adding directly to aquarium, base dose on aquarium volume. Sulfur odor is normal. For exceptionally high chloramine concentrations, a double dose may be used safely. To detoxify nitrite in an emergency, up to 5 times normal dose may be used. If temperature is > 30 °C (86 °F) and chlorine or ammonia levels are low, use a half dose.

You can read more here: https://www.seachem.com/prime.php
 
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Are we talking about ice free water, or pond covered in ice? What kind of water temps?

Ive been using a chlorine hose filter - generally works pretty good except this last one I got totally disintegrating, after shedding weird white particles into the water.

Ive heard that these may not filter ALL chlorine, and also you never know if and when it might expire or quit working for whatever reason (they are only good for so many gallons). So youll want to trickle water in slowly so any traces of chlorine that may exist gets diluted by the circulating pond water

Thats if youre only topping off and not adding a lot. If adding a substantial amt you should add Prime anyway just to be sure.... plus it has beneficial bacteria. I also have chlorine test strips to check water periodically but these may or may not be sensitive to smaller amounts.
 
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This is really helpful. I will add dechlorinator before trickling water in just to be safe - I like the idea of the hose filter, as well, as an extra safety step.

NOW I'm wondering about heat lol - I'm definitely going to have to raise the lip of my pond at some point (I figure I can add 6 inches, maybe more, and increase volume by a lot - can't dig deeper since its made out of concrete) to prevent drastic water temp changes. It's supposed to hit 100 degrees in DC this weekend - I ordered a water thermometer but I am expecting its going to be too warm for comfort.
 
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Shade will help some, both with pond plants and even an umbrella or sun sail or plants around the perimeter. Some people have even resorted to adding ice to the pond if it gets too hot. Make sure you have plenty of aeration going and watch your fish for signs of distress.
 
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If you trickle water in the winter, your water may freeze on a good freeze day
 
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