Any other motorcyclists here?


ZEROPILOT

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One of my other lifelong passions has been motorcycles.
I have three, currently.
A 2016 Harley Switchback for touring with my wife. It's seldom used. 700 miles on it.
A 2002 Honda Firestorm 996 that I've built for my wife to ride and my pride and joy...A stock looking 2014 Kawasaki ZX1441R with 2009 h.p. That is surprisingly comfortable. But my bad back has been limiting my seat time.
(99%of the time I ride calmly)
 

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Ever consider trading in the Ninga for something like a Goldwing? I used to ride sport bikes but also have nerve pain from a bad back. My last bike was a Honda Magna but haven't had anything for a few years.
 

ZEROPILOT

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Ever consider trading in the Ninga for something like a Goldwing? I used to ride sport bikes but also have nerve pain from a bad back. My last bike was a Honda Magna but haven't had anything for a few years.
To me, the Goldwing has gotten so bloated that it's almost a car.
Not that my giant Ninja is so small.
The truth is that my riding days will be over soon.
Then I'll just buy old ones and fix them up.
 
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I used to ride year round when I lived on the west coast, belonged to a club, made a solo trip across Canada.
Now I live in a place that's 5 miles of gravel roads to get home and the bike would be parked for 9 months of the year.
Great way to travel when on the highway.
Maybe one day again...
 
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I used to ride year round when I lived on the west coast, belonged to a club, made a solo trip across Canada.
Now I live in a place that's 5 miles of gravel roads to get home and the bike would be parked for 9 months of the year.
Great way to travel when on the highway.
Maybe one day again...
As an owner of a dual sport bike I find that statement somewhat odd since the main purpose of my dual sport bike is to use it to traverse paved road to get to the gravel or dirt roads. :p

To me, the Goldwing has gotten so bloated that it's almost a car.
Not that my giant Ninja is so small.
The truth is that my riding days will be over soon.
Then I'll just buy old ones and fix them up.
I have a couple Kawasaki klx 250s that my son's and I ride. On the highway it easily keeps up with most traffic and offroad it is still small enough to maneuver around.
I also have had back problems and one prerequisite for me is to have a bike that is comfortable to ride standing up. I find the key to riding (or driving) for long periods of time is being able to change positions and not being frozen in one position. I find I can ride my motorcycle for longer periods of time than I can drive my car simple because I can frequently change positions on my motorcycle from sitting to standing without actually stopping.
My son and I also have motorcycles in the Philippines we use when we go there, he has a Kawasaki Rouser 180 and I have a Rouser 200 which are both considered big bikes over there where most people ride scooters and motorcycle under 150 cc.

 
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This was similar to the bike I had.
Two words to describe trying to ride this on muddy roads: Not fun.
:p

View attachment 105557
I guess I can't blame you, as much as I enjoy riding dirt trails and even crossing the occasional creek or stream, I don't like riding through mud. And if you happen to be riding in a group dusty roads aren't much fun either, although it's not so bad if you take the lead ;).
Still, I don't particularly like driving my car or truck on muddy roads either. :(

Edit: Dusty roads are the bigger problem here, especially this year it was.
 
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If I remember correctly, I chose that bike because I wasn't sure whether I wanted something like a Ninja or a Goldwing.
Riding on the highway is much more enjoyable than stop and go city traffic, so if I do get another one, it would be something like a Goldwing. I don't think I'd like one of those 3 wheel Can Ams (2 front wheels, 1 rear). Those just look weird.
 
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I don't think I'd like one of those 3 wheel Can Ams (2 front wheels, 1 rear). Those just look weird.
On that, we agree. Of course, I've never ridden one so who knows, maybe they are more stable and fun to ride?

On that subject, I've always felt that the inherent dangers of riding motorcycles increase proportionately with the size of the CC. As I mentioned earlier I've found that my little 250 keeps up to highway traffic just fine, in fact, I tend to pass more vehicles than ever pass me. So what does one do with all that extra torque in the bigger bikes? As a rule, it is generally used to get yourself into trouble or break the law. I have enough problem avoiding those things as it is, better I limit myself. :rolleyes:
I've noticed this year there has been a much higher than normal amount of local motorcycle accidents this summer reported on my local news website, some of them fatal. From what I could ascertain all of them were bigger street bikes, at least 600 CC or bigger. Whenever I see someone gunning it full throttle and flying down the highway or through town on a motorcycle at speeds well past the posted speed limit, it's always on one of those crotch rocket Nija type motorcycles. Always! There has got to be a connection.
 
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Part of the enjoyment of riding a bike is leaning it into corners, you can't do that with one of those 3 wheelers.

I rode a newer 500cc Honda Shadow from Vancouver to Calgary and it had trouble passing vehicles on some of the hills, my Honda Sabre was a 750cc and I felt more comfortable passing vehicles with it on the same route.
Those Goldwings are pretty heavy, and when I want to pass someone, I want to pass them quickly, not take forever.
Those bigger cruisers are so heavy they even have reverse gears for getting out of parking spots.
The aerodynamics of a big bike and their fairings are much less tiring for long 12 hour days as well, plus they have a cruise control or throttle lock of some kind.
Riding a bike is more riskier for sure, you'll always lose in an accident.
 
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I rode a newer 500cc Honda Shadow from Vancouver to Calgary and it had trouble passing vehicles on some of the hills, my Honda Sabre was a 750cc and I felt more comfortable passing vehicles with it on the same route.
Those Goldwings are pretty heavy, and when I want to pass someone, I want to pass them quickly, not take forever.
.
You are kind of proving my point. It is precisely that overly quick acceleration of the more powerful bikes that is getting people killed. There are so many traffic scenarios where you actually need to have a delay to give all parties time to see each other and react safely. I figure if I don't have the room to pass a car going up a hill I probably shouldn't be passing. True, having more torque will always allow you to pass in a shorter stretch of road but generally the safer course of action is simply to wait until you can do so in a safer location. At least that's how I feel more comfortable. Knowing you have the power to pass when you probably aught not is the heart of the problem.
None of this is to say you can't ride a powerful bike safely, but most people with those bikes find themselves pushing the limits. Even Zeropilot admits he pushes it 1% of the time. :eek:
 
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I've frequently come across drivers that would speed up as I was passing them. I don't think it was intentional, just the other driver not being aware of their own constant speed. Many were senior citizens. I would back off passing, get back behind them and they would slow down to their original slower speed.
If I'm timing my passing correctly, my original attempt at passing would have been fine.

More power does bring more responsibility.
Another thing with having more power - my Sabre had a shaft driven rear wheel. If I accelerated while going around a corner, the torque would push the rear wheel downwards, changing the angle of the bike's lean.
That sure came as a surprise and something they don't tell you when you buy the bike!:eek:
 

ZEROPILOT

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You are kind of proving my point. It is precisely that overly quick acceleration of the more powerful bikes that is getting people killed. There are so many traffic scenarios where you actually need to have a delay to give all parties time to see each other and react safely. I figure if I don't have the room to pass a car going up a hill I probably shouldn't be passing. True, having more torque will always allow you to pass in a shorter stretch of road but generally the safer course of action is simply to wait until you can do so in a safer location. At least that's how I feel more comfortable. Knowing you have the power to pass when you probably aught not is the heart of the problem.
None of this is to say you can't ride a powerful bike safely, but most people with those bikes find themselves pushing the limits. Even Zeropilot admits he pushes it 1% of the time. :eek:
Yes. I have over 40 years of riding behind me and my bike has traction control for tire spin, anti "wheelying"launch control and anti lock brakes. These features would make most people safe(r).
I ride such a large motorcycle because 1) I like to do some drag racing and 2) I'd look like a fool on a small bike because I'm large in stature.
Most people would still be ill advised to just choose such a bike out of thin air. It does mid nine second quarter miles stock.
But honestly, the 600cc bikes of late aren't a whole lot slower.
I find that my personal biggest danger is drivers of automobiles. I treat each car or truck as something that's out to flatten me. And I drive defensively.
South Florida traffic is dangerous.
I won't even recommend anyone who's not already experienced to start riding here and I cringe when I see anyone riding like they are immortal.
Funny enough, most times any one that seems to want to race. Wants me to speed is usually someone on a Harley. I always think "Don't you read?";)
Do you like humiliation?
Generally I'll pass on the oportunity....unless there's no traffic ahead. Then the moron in me also comes out.

Most sport bike riders know what Godzilla is capable of.
I bought my Harley to just cruise. (My first and only) But I almost always grab the keys to the big Kawasaki. I think it's the adrenaline that I need.
 
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I was going to mention that one circumstance where a guy might need a more powerful motorcycle than a 250 is if he happens to be a bigger guy or wants to carry a passenger.

Another good reason is for videos like this.... :LOL:
 

addy1

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We have two Harleys, both sportsters. My late hubbies is a 88 was a 883 but he tricked it out to a 1300cc racing cams, balanced, blue printed, billeted chrome, zero miles put on it. Ported polished engine, great paint job, beautiful bike! He rode it once after he spent 30k on the thing. It is sitting in the garage here.
Dear new hubby has a 98 883 sportster with 6000 miles on it. Sitting in the garage.

I worked in a trauma hospital for 37 years, can not get on a motorcycle and ride it. Saw too much.

Hubby wants to ride, sort of, but I sort of request he doesn't rather have him alive and in once piece. The east coast drivers are insane!

We do have some electric bikes now, I will ride them in our neighborhood, at the beach, but never on the main roads. The roads here, small twisty, no real shoulder, drivers that drive insane speeds.

I like my bones in one piece.
 

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Probably not a popular stance on this thread, by motorcycles are one of my pet peeves...not all of them, but the ones that are loud...which are most. I hate the way they assault nature which their noise, and I can't understand how they are allowed to be so loud when if my car muffler had a hole and was making that kind of noise, I'd get a ticket.
 
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Maybe I'm just and old fart but I like peace and quiet and cannot understand how anyone can ride on anything as loud as a Harley. I also like classic design so I don't understand crotch rockets. For me I'm happy motoring down my county road on a Vespa with the wind blowing where my hair used to be. Anything more than 60 MPH I want 4 wheels under me. For that I have an XKE and a Porsche Boxster.
 
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ZEROPILOT

Faster than you are.
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Probably not a popular stance on this thread, by motorcycles are one of my pet peeves...not all of them, but the ones that are loud...which are most. I hate the way they assault nature which their noise, and I can't understand how they are allowed to be so loud when if my car muffler had a hole and was making that kind of noise, I'd get a ticket.
Actually loud is NOT legal. But seldom inforced. It's bad for motorcycling in general to draw negative attention.
 

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