Aquascaped ponds?

Discussion in 'Garden Pond Photography' started by DutchMuch, May 21, 2017.

  1. DutchMuch

    Meyer Jordan Tadpole

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    Meyer Jordan, Aug 6, 2017
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  2. DutchMuch

    DutchMuch Lord Of The Aquascapes!

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    DutchMuch, Aug 6, 2017
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  3. DutchMuch

    Meyer Jordan Tadpole

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    There's that attitude again.

    I am not disagreeing with you, but obviously others that seem to be considered as sources, do.

    I added my thought earlier..

    The Hardiness of a plant should always be determined if you do not want to replace it every year. No-one likes buying a plant that they were told would overwinter, only to find out that it won't.
     
    Meyer Jordan, Aug 6, 2017
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  4. DutchMuch

    brokensword Not all those who wander are lost

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    Meyer; thanks for the link. I followed a couple of leads though, and there's no zone hardiness, which is what I'm most concerned about. That's why when I read the plant typically exists in southern countries/states, I have to figure my chances of growing/keeping alive in a pond, go down. I figured that if I can't get the oxygenators via usual online resources, probably there's a reason. Like you said; I don't want to replace them every year. I do like the idea of plant diversity both above and below the surface, but if conditions aren't conducive, I'll make do with what I can grow/control. There's more than enough variety as I've already shown. I just liked the idea of adding different plants. I may try some cabomba or vallisneria, but not until I have enough grown in an aquarium to withstand grazing/water conditions.

    Nate; I think as you build your pond, keep this whole idea in mind re aquascaping, but realize you're more southerly and should have more success (than me). Still, try some that are NOT as hardy in your zone and see what happens. I think then you'll know what I'm up against. You can control all the variables in an aquarium (interior) but outside, I'm at Nature's whim. Many, many floating and marginals that I can use and I have. And the floaters reproduce so fast, and are very inexpensive to replace each year, that it makes a lot of sense for me to 'scape' the surface and not worry as much about beneath.

    Michael
     
    brokensword, Aug 6, 2017
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  5. DutchMuch

    Meyer Jordan Tadpole

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    Maybe you can find the temperature range for the plants in question at this site. It is apperently a supplier of plants for 'aquascaping'. The temperature range for the plant is in the upper right hand corner.

    http://www.extraplant.com/cabomba-furcata.html
     
    Meyer Jordan, Aug 6, 2017
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  6. DutchMuch

    brokensword Not all those who wander are lost

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    Meyer; I appreciate all the effort re links, but even this one is giving only 'growing' conditions. When I looked up Hornwort, they don't mention it can overwinter. So, those temps you point toward aren't really going to do me any good. I think some chart/site that lists winter hardy oxygenators/plants is probably going to be the best. And the retail sites will address what they sell, usually, giving me the best chance of trying something different that will survive almost freezing temps.
     
    brokensword, Aug 6, 2017
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  7. DutchMuch

    Lisak1

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    I am skeptical of the feasibility of growing underwater plants in a garden pond - my reasoning? I've seen lots and lots AND LOTS of ponds of all different kinds and not one of them had any kind of underwater plantings. (I don't count hornwort, as that is generally free floating rather than actually planted.) I feel if it were possible to do it, I would have seen it by now in one of the dozens and dozens of ponds we have visited.

    One big deterrent will be fish - I know mine would LOVE for me to plant some things underwater for them to root around in. And that would be the end of that. My husband is always wanting to try growing some underwater plants, but the various searches we have done have turned up the usual two or three varieties, all of which we have tried with no success. The closest we have come is parrot's feather, which will grow from the shelf to the surface, but anything deeper than that has been unsuccessful.

    I'll watch your attempt with interest @brokensword especially since we're in the same zone.
     
    Lisak1, Aug 6, 2017
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  8. DutchMuch

    Lisak1

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    Amen to that! I've had a few heated discussions with some local nurseries over that particular topic!
     
    Lisak1, Aug 7, 2017
    #68
  9. DutchMuch

    DutchMuch Lord Of The Aquascapes!

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    upload_2017-8-6_19-27-18.jpeg
    upload_2017-8-6_19-27-27.jpeg upload_2017-8-6_19-27-33.jpeg

    [​IMG]http://www.thepondguy.com/category/water-gardens-fish-ponds-submerged-plants

    [​IMG]


    @brokensword Bolboltis (spellcheck) is also a good species, idk about 4ft depth though with it.. maybe when it gets bigger.


    Any plant you can grow inside, can be grown outside, with a simple task:
    Care for it well.

    The pond we are making (I think zone 8? anyway we have below 0 winters) will consist of:

    Bolboltis
    Cabomba fruitica
    Bacopa (caroliana, and monnieri)
    Ludwigia rubin
    Ludwigia repens
    Dwarf Sagitaria
    Vallisneria Jungle
    Anarchis
    Various Lilys,
    So on so forth.
     
    DutchMuch, Aug 7, 2017
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  10. DutchMuch

    Lisak1

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    I have no doubt the underwater plants can grow in a natural pond. But a liner pond is a whole different animal.
     
    Lisak1, Aug 7, 2017
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  11. DutchMuch

    DutchMuch Lord Of The Aquascapes!

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    lol lisak1 no kidding! :p I have owned (well you know what I mean :) ) a pond(s) before this isn't my first run, roots, TAP ROOTS, etc etc. The roots on these specific plants do not get long, or "hard" like Crypts for example. They are soft and skinny, since they are small (majority)

    The fish we plan on getting also do not eat plants as their main meal..!


    You will just have to watch my showcase I just started the other day, to find out ;)
     
    DutchMuch, Aug 7, 2017
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  12. DutchMuch

    Jhn

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    My aunt and uncle live in zone 6/7 have a water garden with just goldfish in it, and have an immense growth of anacharis/elodea in the deep portion near their waterfall. The stuff grows to the surface in about 3-4' of water, have to admit it is an interesting look.

    I can't get crap to grow for underwater plants besides hornwort in my large pond, koi destroy it. Hornwort is just tough enough to grow back from little sprigs.

    DutchMuch, those are some cool looking pics of submerged plant growth. I just built a 7'x14' x3' deep pond dedicated to terrapins. I am going to try and see if I can get some submerged plants growing in there. I am not going to put koi/goldfish in there, only native fish/minnows that I can get from the local streams, so the fish shouldn't tear the plants up too bad.
     
    Jhn, Aug 7, 2017
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  13. DutchMuch

    Meyer Jordan Tadpole

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    You might want to investigate this site as they list Hardiness zones.

    https://www.pondmegastore.com/shop/product.php?productid=16430
     
    Meyer Jordan, Aug 7, 2017
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  14. DutchMuch

    DutchMuch Lord Of The Aquascapes!

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    Darters?
    Also cool beans! document it!
     
    DutchMuch, Aug 7, 2017
    #74
  15. DutchMuch

    DutchMuch Lord Of The Aquascapes!

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    Also if you need some I can hook you up ;)
     
    DutchMuch, Aug 7, 2017
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  16. DutchMuch

    Lisak1

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    In AK you could be anywhere from a 6B to an 8A. I will definitely be watching your progress. Did you say you started a showcase? Or are you referring to your Inspiration post?

    Small fish would be more compatible for sure - but most people with garden ponds want larger, more colorful fish.

    @Jhn - do you know if your aunt and uncle have the anacharis rooted in the pond? I've dreamed up some ideas for starting plants underwater but none have worked, so I'm always curious if anyone has been successful doing so.
     
    Lisak1, Aug 7, 2017
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  17. DutchMuch

    Jhn

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    Lol, will let u know when I am ready to get some.

    Yes, darters and dace will be the native fish.
     
    Jhn, Aug 7, 2017
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  18. DutchMuch

    Jhn

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    If I remember correctly, they had it in a wide shallow pot of pea gravel initially, and it kind of spilled over the sides and took over the deep end of their pond. Next time, I see them I will ask them how they got it to grow like that or I could go up and check their pond out and see if it is still in there. (it has been a couple years, since I saw their pond).

    I have tried to mimic what I thought they did in my pond, but between the koi and their fast growing babies I can't get it going in there w/o it being uprooted and eaten. At the moment trying to get it going in a large tub then transfer it after it takes the tub over.
     
    Jhn, Aug 7, 2017
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  19. DutchMuch

    Lisak1

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    That was kind of my idea - start the plants in a gravel filled shallow tray or pan and then transfer to the pond once it gets going. I'll look forward to hearing what you find out!
     
    Lisak1, Aug 7, 2017
    #79
  20. DutchMuch

    brokensword Not all those who wander are lost

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    Lisa;

    I tried last year to root some Hornwort but the fish/turtles ate it all. I've tried throwing bunches of the stuff in past years and it doesn't last, either. This year, I put many more 'sprigs' in and they took root. So far, I have them still (plus new growths) and the summer is 2/3 over. I go down to the local pond and plantnap a bunch, tie stones to their root system, and plopped them onto a shelf below the waterfall. I DO see some predation on the upper pieces but since I knew it would possibly take over the pond, I am watching carefully. The fish seem to be grazing as it's not out of control. Worst case scenario, I harvest the topmost portions, or I replenish next year (it's free, so no problem). All this said, I have gf, not koi. From what I've read, you'd probably have to plant a good number this way to stay ahead and maybe then, you'd lose out.

    I'll upload a bit of video and you can see how my 'hornwort forest' is doing. Should be posted by tomorrow as I have to edit and upload to youtube first. My previous bits don't show it.

    Still, I'd give it a shot if you're interested. I did my little hornwort garden to give the turtles and fish something else to eat in the early spring as well as to filter out anything coming off the waterfall. It is much better this year and I may augment what I have next year if I see no further progress.

    Btw, my pond is liner with a smallish thickness of built up mulm/sand/soil, etc, so not like I have ideal growing conditions but from how the hornwort grew in the local 'big' pond, I knew it was aggressive and might survive.

    Michael
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2017
    brokensword, Aug 7, 2017
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