Best Good Bargain Sump Pump?


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I'm seeking recommendations for the lowest cost but high duty cycle decent power sump pump for a basement that if not pumped out would have a foot of standing water in it for all of spring (and does currently, since we just had a thaw after 30" of snow). Looking for links to buy online in the USA. Needs to move a pretty good amount of water, and needs to be something that will be running a lot, not like most sump pumps that only fire in emergencies: this basement has a routine flooding issue, the house is built on bedrock and the groundwater runs through this basement (in the summer, it flows through, but the outlet is currently frozen since it's now winter), it's just what it does in the winter/spring. Been pumping with my 1200gph pond pump for 6 hours and managed to lower the water level only about 6" so far (enough to get the furnace out of the water, thankfully).
 
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We updated our sump pumps a few years ago. We have two pits and pumps - they run very frequently in our house too. They will pump non-stop for days during heavy rains. After much research we chose two Zoeller pumps.

This one is in the back up pit:


This one is in the main pit:

The second one is designed to use an add on switch - my husband did all the research so I don't remember why he opted for the add on switch, but I would guess it was reliability. The floats on previous pumps would frequently get stuck:


We've been in our house 30 years and these are the fifth set of pumps we've put in. These are almost six years old already and have functioned great so far.
 
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I’m guessing that you are having water deep in through concrete?
This might help reduce how much water comes in, unless it’s coming in via a drain pipe or window.
 
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I have also been using a Zoeller sump pump for years. They are reliable and long lasting. The built on automatic float valve functions flawlessly as long as nothing obstructs it's movement.

Be sure to follow the instructions. A check valve should be installed in the outlet pipe so the water doesn't return when the pump shuts off.

Also, as per the instructions, there needs to be a small weep hole in the pipe right after the pump. I think it has something to do with preventing air from getting trapped and causing air lock.

You should have the pump in one of those plastic sump pits protecting it from sucking up debris. There should be holes in the side walls to allow the pit to fill with water. Years ago I had a sump pump jamb up because a tiny stick got caught in the impeller.
 
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I’m guessing that you are having water deep in through concrete?
This might help reduce how much water comes in, unless it’s coming in via a drain pipe or window.
It pours down like a waterfall down the back wall from the casement window because the house is built on top of bedrock and the house backs up to a steep hillside with almost no topsoil, so all the groundwater just pours down the hill, and because there's no perc on the hill, it just pours into the house through this window, it's not a concrete porousity issue, the window should never have been installed here. There needs to be a drain installed between the hillside and this window or something. I don't own the house. I rent the in-law unit here. I'm just trying to help my landlady out. Her husband died this past summer and these sort of repairs are just totally beyond her. I told her I would look into the best sump pump and put it in for her. The house has a sump pump well and it set up for one, the basement has channels for it, the old one is just dead. I'm going to see what I can do about this window/drainage problem come next summer.

20201229_145842.jpg
 
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I have also been using a Zoeller sump pump for years. They are reliable and long lasting. The built on automatic float valve functions flawlessly as long as nothing obstructs it's movement.

Be sure to follow the instructions. A check valve should be installed in the outlet pipe so the water doesn't return when the pump shuts off.

Also, as per the instructions, there needs to be a small weep hole in the pipe right after the pump. I think it has something to do with preventing air from getting trapped and causing air lock.

You should have the pump in one of those plastic sump pits protecting it from sucking up debris. There should be holes in the side walls to allow the pit to fill with water. Years ago I had a sump pump jamb up because a tiny stick got caught in the impeller.
I'll have to find all that to buy it online, you happen to have links? I have no idea what I need, never done any of this before.
 
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Pics, for entertainment value.

My pond pump, pumping in the sump pump basin:
20201229_145424.jpg
The way in:
20201229_145415.jpg
The process of walking, picking up one milk crate, moving it around to front, stepping on, reaching around to other crate, repeating process. Concrete drops down here, black milk crate only about 3" above water level, the deep channel you see there between the two crates is where the water normally would go to get to the sump basin:
20201229_145450.jpg
The path to the furnace:
20201229_145512.jpg
The back wall, the source of the waterfall:
20201229_145521.jpg
The water was well up onto the furnace when I started pumping yesterday, see water line, pretty sure this is dangerous:
20201229_145913.jpg
 
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Looking at the sump pump basins on Amazon, I don't see why I could not use a 5 gallon paint pail that I drill some holes in with a lid and pass the pipe up through the bunghole that you'd normally pour the paint out of the lid, assuming I can fit a 5 gallon pail in my hole? Wouldn't any sturdy bucket with some holes drilled in it with a tight-fitting lid with a hole for the pipe work? The specially-designed sump basins are expensive.
 
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Yeah, very dangerous. I think you might be bumping up the outside drain in priority to avoid it flooding and possibly killing the furnace, or creating an issue with the furnace that kills you. A pick and shovel, working on a drainage ditch to divert the water around the window and down the hill. And maybe if you can access the outside of the window, good quality caulking to water proof it from heavy rains .
 
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Yeah, very dangerous. I think you might be bumping up the outside drain in priority to avoid it flooding and possibly killing the furnace, or creating an issue with the furnace that kills you. A pick and shovel, working on a drainage ditch to divert the water around the window and down the hill. And maybe if you can access the outside of the window, good quality caulking to water proof it from heavy rains .
Yeah, the landlady said she was very grateful for my help is saving the furnace as she can't afford to replace it. I'm staying OUT of the water in case it does get electrified, the milk crates should insulate me, and I did put an LED light bulb in the water to test to be sure it wasn't hot before even risking that. Unfortunately, the ground is frozen solid for the next 6 months at least, so there will be nothing to be done until then except getting a sump pump running. Lucky I had a pond pump I could repurpose to get the water level down some! Hopefully the drainage from this big melt stops before Thursday, because I won't be here to babysit my pond pump for new year's eve/day so she's going to have to hope for the best. I'm hoping for a major cold snap tomorrow/all week. If it suddenly got into the single digits or even low teens that would be the best thing right now as it would stop the groundwater from flowing.
 
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Wow! What a mess!

You say the water is coming in through the window. If that is the only source, then maybe you can divert it before it gets to the window. Dig trenches, build soil berms....whatever it takes. That water has to be diverted away from that window and away from the foundation all together. You need to get to the root of the problem. Constant pumping is not the answer.

This problem needs to be corrected asap. This can't continue like this since all the utilities are down there.
 
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@Lisak1 I'm trying to figure out what fittings I need to buy to screw into this pump. What screws into this hole? Like what do I search for on Amazon to buy what I need? 1 1/2" PVC? With what type of thread pattern?
what-to-buy.jpg
 
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Wow! What a mess!

You say the water is coming in through the window. If that is the only source, then maybe you can divert it before it gets to the window. Dig trenches, build soil berms....whatever it takes. That water has to be diverted away from that window and away from the foundation all together. You need to get to the root of the problem. Constant pumping is not the answer.

This problem needs to be corrected asap. This can't continue like this since all the utilities are down there.
It's been this way for years...so far everything's been fine, just have to keep the water flowing out and it's not a major problem. I know it's not conventional to have water running behind the electrical panel and as a small river through the basement, and trust me, I'd rather it not, but I really can't do anything to remedy it until summer, the ground is frozen. There is currently an iceberg around that window outside. I did try to hack at it for a while today, but it is solid ice. If it doesn't refreeze and there is another thaw and it does soften enough to remove, I will attempt to sandbag around the window or something temporary. There's only so much work I am willing to invest into the place for free, too. I'm generous, but this is really a major job that the landlady needs to hire a professional to resolve, which means that it will simply never happen unless I do it myself. She is, however, willing to buy a sump pump, so sump pump it is. Come summer, I will take a stab at trying to make the situation better around the window, but I suspect it needs major drainage work, like to be excavated and have new gravel and maybe french drains installed...stuff I can't do for free.
 
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@Lisak1 I'm trying to figure out what fittings I need to buy to screw into this pump. What screws into this hole? Like what do I search for on Amazon to buy what I need? 1 1/2" PVC? With what type of thread pattern?
View attachment 135784
You need schedule 40 PVC pipe and fittings, PVC primer and glue.
You can get them at Home Depot, Lowe's or any place that sells hardware. The parts are inexpensive.

You'll need a threaded male PVC adapter to screw in there. A PVC check valve and any fittings (90's, etc.) you need to get it out and away from the house.

If you've never worked with PVC pipe, look it up online. It's very easy. Dry fit your fittings and draw a line across the joints. This way you know how it goes together when gluing it. The glue sets up fast.

Use a hacksaw or something similar to cut the pipe.
 
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It's been this way for years...so far everything's been fine, just have to keep the water flowing out and it's not a major problem. I know it's not conventional to have water running behind the electrical panel and as a small river through the basement, and trust me, I'd rather it not, but I really can't do anything to remedy it until summer, the ground is frozen. There is currently an iceberg around that window outside. I did try to hack at it for a while today, but it is solid ice. If it doesn't refreeze and there is another thaw and it does soften enough to remove, I will attempt to sandbag around the window or something temporary. There's only so much work I am willing to invest into the place for free, too. I'm generous, but this is really a major job that the landlady needs to hire a professional to resolve, which means that it will simply never happen unless I do it myself. She is, however, willing to buy a sump pump, so sump pump it is. Come summer, I will take a stab at trying to make the situation better around the window, but I suspect it needs major drainage work, like to be excavated and have new gravel and maybe french drains installed...stuff I can't do for free.
Sandbags sound like a good temporary fix.
 
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You need schedule 40 PVC pipe and fittings, PVC primer and glue.
You can get them at Home Depot, Lowe's or any place that sells hardware. The parts are inexpensive.

You'll need a threaded male PVC adapter to screw in there. A PVC check valve and any fittings (90's, etc.) you need to get it out and away from the house.

If you've never worked with PVC pipe, look it up online. It's very easy. Dry fit your fittings and draw a line across the joints. This way you know how it goes together when gluing it. The glue sets up fast.

Use a hacksaw or something similar to cut the pipe.
Thank you, trying to buy it all online because I do not have a car, so going to the hardware store means walking an hour in the freezing cold or bumming a ride off someone, which I really don't like doing, especially in the pandemic when I'm trying to stay away from others since I'm high risk for covid complications.
 
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Thank you, trying to buy it all online because I do not have a car, so going to the hardware store means walking an hour in the freezing cold or bumming a ride off someone, which I really don't like doing, especially in the pandemic when I'm trying to stay away from others since I'm high risk for covid complications.
Ok, just buy it all on Amazon with the sump pump. Fittings, pipe, primer and glue.
Figure out what fittings you need to get it to the outside.
The PVC threaded male will screw right into the pump outlet as long as you get the right size.
 
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You need schedule 40 PVC pipe and fittings, PVC primer and glue.
@poconojoe Any reason to choose https://www.homedepot.com/p/HYDROMA...ting-Slip-x-Slip-10-Pack-406-010-10/312905395 over https://www.homedepot.com/p/NIBCO-1...ong-Turn-Elbow-Fitting-C4807LTHD112/100347073 or vice versa? I have to come up about 3 feet and then make a 90 degree turn to go through the foundation (there's already a hole there for the pipe to pass through). Also is https://www.homedepot.com/p/Charlot...MPT-x-S-Male-Adapter-PVC021091400HD/203811646 the correct fitting for screwing into the pump?
 
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Ok, just buy it all on Amazon with the sump pump. Fittings, pipe, primer and glue.
Figure out what fittings you need to get it to the outside.
The PVC threaded male will screw right into the pump outlet as long as you get the right size.
why not use flex pvc (as for the pond) as it will cut down on fittings and hence, head pressure. I know it's not 'up to code' but this whole situation is a code nightmare. A permanent solution as has been mentioned is a priority. If the water takes out any electrical, besides maybe doing bodily harm, you're going to lose plumbing (if no heat) if not fixed pronto.

I know you say this has been ongoing and maybe you're staying because the price is right, but this is an accident waiting to happen. It goes beyond convenience and or funds, it's smack dab in the middle of safety.

I'd insist repairs be made or else I'd be looking for different digs. YMMV
 
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@poconojoe Any reason to choose https://www.homedepot.com/p/HYDROMA...ting-Slip-x-Slip-10-Pack-406-010-10/312905395 over https://www.homedepot.com/p/NIBCO-1...ong-Turn-Elbow-Fitting-C4807LTHD112/100347073 or vice versa? I have to come up about 3 feet and then make a 90 degree turn to go through the foundation (there's already a hole there for the pipe to pass through). Also is https://www.homedepot.com/p/Charlot...MPT-x-S-Male-Adapter-PVC021091400HD/203811646 the correct fitting for screwing into the pump?
If the sump pump has an 1-1/2" outlet, then make sure everything is that size. You showed 1" in the first link and 1-1/2" in the other links.

You don't need the wide sweeping 90 degree elbow, just the regular 90 degree elbow.

Yes, that male adapter is what you need, as long as it's the right size for the pump's outlet.

From what you are describing, you probably only need one 90 degree elbow. They are cheap, so if you think you might need to make another turn, get more.

Dont forget the primer and glue. They sell small 8-ounce cans packed as a pair (primer & glue). You don't need much.
The primer cleans and primers in preparation for the glue.

If this were a permanent installation, I would strongly suggest a check valve to prevent the water from flowing back when the pump shuts off. That's up to you.

Good luck and any more questions, just ask.
 

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