Best Much Pellets?


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Sludge eating bacteria. Such as the brand "Muck Away". Google "Pond Muck Pellets"
 

Meyer Jordan

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Didn't know that this treatment was now in pellets. Can't help you, because I don't use 'Sludge Busters'. Sediment never gets to a problem level.
 

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Is your pond earth-bottomed? I see where these pellets are designed for use in natural ponds and lakes to extend the period between dredgings.
 
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Is your pond earth-bottomed? I see where these pellets are designed for use in natural ponds and lakes to extend the period between dredgings.

I have a large lined pond. The pellets are used to cut down on the sludge created by decomposing leaves, food that wasn't eaten and fish waste. Muck creates ammonia gases which is harmful to the fish. The good bacteria can make a considerable difference. I am curious if anyone on the forum believes if one product is better than another...
 

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I am quite familiar with the biological processes of a pond. Good bacteria are always present. I have never had a need to use any of these sludge digesting products because I never experience any meaningful sediment accumulation in my pond or any of the many ponds that I service. I would think that the long-term solution would be to eliminate this accumulation through increased water flow and filtration.
 
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I am quite familiar with the biological processes of a pond. Good bacteria are always present. I have never had a need to use any of these sludge digesting products because I never experience any meaningful sediment accumulation in my pond or any of the many ponds that I service. I would think that the long-term solution would be to eliminate this accumulation through increased water flow and filtration.

Thats awesome for you. My 5,000 gallon pond is located at the base of hundreds of acres of woods. I wish I had a superpower to blow every leaf that flew off the trees and redirect them to miss the pond and unfortunately I can't control my fish from deficating after consuming food. I dont have a foot of sludge but muck pellets would greatly aid in keeping the muck that does accumulate down. Its seems as though you are an experienced pond guy therefore I would only assume you have the knowledge to understand that no filter on the market can filter leaves from trees, every bit of uneaten food that sinks to the bottom and every bit of defication from the fish
 

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Thats awesome for you. My 5,000 gallon pond is located at the base of hundreds of acres of woods. I wish I had a superpower to blow every leaf that flew off the trees and redirect them to miss the pond and unfortunately I can't control my fish from deficating after consuming food. I dont have a foot of sludge but muck pellets would greatly aid in keeping the muck that does accumulate down. Its seems as though you are an experienced pond guy therefore I would only assume you have the knowledge to understand that no filter on the market can filter leaves from trees, every bit of uneaten food that sinks to the bottom and every bit of defication from the fish

I completely understand what you are saying. My 4400 gallon pond (with no bottom drain) is partially located under Oak and Pecan trees with more trees in close proximity. I get heavy leaf drop both in Spring and in Fall in addition to pollen and Pecan tassels and acorns. Add to this 35 Koi from 10" to 30" that are well fed. I have a total flow rate of 9000 gph through 2 skimmers and more than adequate bioconversion. I do not have any measurable sediment accumulation on this pond at any time of year and water quality remain stable and good. It can be done.
 
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What is the end product of these muck pellets? Nitrogen gas?
I'm always skeptical of "add this stuff and your problems will be solved" products.

I have a 6000g rubber lined pond and a 1.5m gallon clay bottom pond. The rubber lined pond is replenished by rainwater/snow melt and the big pond has a year round stream that runs through it.
I've always viewed algae as a problem solver for the ponds. It prevents dangerous buildup of elements that are harmful to aquatic life forms.
Algae is also an indicator of a pond's overall health.

Meyer, do you have a way of determining how much water circulation is reaching the bottom of your pond? The gph turnover is fine, but if it's not reaching the bottom layer, the detritus will not get stirred up and removed by the filters, so it won't be all that useful.

.
 
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Meyer Jordan

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What is the end product of these muck pellets? Nitrogen gas?
I'm always skeptical of "add this stuff and your problems will be solved" products.

I have a 6000g rubber lined pond and a 1.5m gallon clay bottom pond. The rubber lined pond is replenished by rainwater/snow melt and the big pond has a year round stream that runs through it.
I've always viewed algae as a problem solver for the ponds. It prevents dangerous buildup of elements that are harmful to aquatic life forms.
Algae is also an indicator of a pond's overall health.

Meyer, do you have a way of determining how much water circulation is reaching the bottom of your pond? The gph turnover is fine, but if it's not reaching the bottom layer, the detritus will not get stirred up and removed by the filters, so it won't be all that useful.

.

Remember the query about the butterfly flapping its wings in the Amazon jungle?
If you have Koi, or Goldfish, of any size, they will create mini-currents simply by the act of swimming. While there may still be a predominate laminar aspect to the flow, there is more than enough fish created turbulence to suspend any smaller detritus, including leaves. In an eco-system pond (R & G), there is the added advantage of the turbulence created by the rocked sides of the pond. Added to all of this is the bottom-feeding action of Koi which will quite effectually keep things stirred up. It is easily possible to skim/filter out better that 90%-95% of the organic debris before any noticeable natural decomp takes place.

I like your opening question. While 'Sludge-Busting' treatments achieve a certain level of sediment reduction, the end product is, at first, a lower DO level because of the additional bacterial action and then an increase in TDS and DOC which may cause other unwanted events such as a sudden increase in algae (including filamentous) because of the Phosphorus that is released from the decay of the leaves.
 
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Yes I have heard of the butterfly effect, but I thought it was in China.:rolleyes:

In my mind, bacteria are always present, everywhere. The only thing that would limit their population would be conditions favourable for a particular strain.
I see that these pellets contain trace elements, so maybe that's what is helping increase bacterial activity within the sludge.
I guess I don't see these pellets as being harmful, but having proper water circulation would certainly help instead.
 

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