Bypass/removing UV light for winter?


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I bought our house last November and the previous owners were fairly lax in their winterizing instructions. As per their instructions, I unplugged the UV light and left the pump (in-pond submerged) running which seemed fine. The waterfall action kept the water near the fall open and the layout of the pond really doesn't allow for the water to leave the pond if the waterfall freezes. Even if the water leaks behind the filter box or something, it'd still make it's way back to the pond.

Anyway, come spring I found the UV light was not working and had a cracked quartz glass tube as well as the ballast was dead. I'm assuming it froze enough over winter to where it cracked the glass and must have messed the ballast up. This pic was taken when I replaced the UV light. I'm not even sure the light is required. I've tested the water throughout this year and all levels were fine. It was a little green in the spring but either the UV light fixed it or the lilly pads and other foliage blocked enough sunlight to keep it controlled over the summer.

pondFilter.JPEG


I'd prefer to bypass and either drain the water out of it or remove it completely but the tubing was not designed for easy removal while keeping the pump functional. Does anyone have any recommendations on how to winterize an external UV light? I was thinking to buy "T" fittings/valves and some unions for quick disconnects so the uv light can be bypassed but couldn't find such that'd work with the piping type last spring when I went to a couple big-box stores as well as a large fish store near us. I'm currently in process of trimming the foliage around the pond down in preparation for winter and will be giving the filter box sponge a rinse before winter sets in. While I have all the rocks covering the filter box removed, I might as well remove the UV light if that's the route to go for winterizing it.
 
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brokensword

...and not every pond in Michigan has a loon!
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what mrsclem said; UV is for killing free floating algae (along with other 'good' critters) and a lot here don't use them as we find the pond does fine re alge when employing bog filtration. Search here and see if it's something that interests you.

You could then eliminate your current filter (and it's maintenance). Or if you decide to just eschew the UV, I'd convert those fittings to something you can easily get at the big box stores. If you cut out the UV and put in a bulkhead fitting into that filter box, you'd be all set for normal/regular pipe tubing/sizes.


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I would remove it and take it inside for the winter.

Find a way to rig it so it's easily removed for future winterization.

Couldn't you keep the hoses connected to the UV, but disconnect the other two ends, then add a (longer) hose between?
I hope that make sense...? Hard for me to explain...
Big box home improvement and hardware stores sell that clear tubing. They sell it by the foot.

There are mixed feelings on using a UV light.
It's said they kill even the good microorganisms that are needed in your pond's ecosystem.
Then, everything they kill just ends up in the pond which serves as food for more algae growth. It's a vicious cycle.

That being said, I don't use one. I used to have one, but got rid of it and my filters when I added on the bog.

Before the bog, my water was solid green from algae. And that was with two pressure filters and a UV light running.

My water was crystal clear within a week after adding the bog. Huge improvement. I saw fish I didn't know I had! My water looks like you can drink it.

There's the plug....the bog plug that is..... @brokensword ;)

Oh, love the live action sword chopping emoji, or whatever it's called, you've been displaying. Cool stuff being put out by a couple of members.
 

brokensword

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I would remove it and take it inside for the winter.

Find a way to rig it so it's easily removed for future winterization.

Couldn't you keep the hoses connected to the UV, but disconnect the other two ends, then add a (longer) hose between?
I hope that make sense...? Hard for me to explain...
Big box home improvement and hardware stores sell that clear tubing. They sell it by the foot.

There are mixed feelings on using a UV light.
It's said they kill even the good microorganisms that are needed in your pond's ecosystem.
Then, everything they kill just ends up in the pond which serves as food for more algae growth. It's a vicious cycle.

That being said, I don't use one. I used to have one, but got rid of it and my filters when I added on the bog.

Before the bog, my water was solid green from algae. And that was with two pressure filters and a UV light running.

My water was crystal clear within a week after adding the bog. Huge improvement. I saw fish I didn't know I had! My water looks like you can drink it.

There's the plug....the bog plug that is..... @brokensword ;)

Oh, love the live action sword chopping emoji, or whatever it's called, you've been displaying. Cool stuff being put out by a couple of members.
thanks, PJ; twas a gift from j.w--and I've grown attached to it too!

(glad to see the BFC prez is on the job!)

smilie sword twirl.gif
 
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well, after removing the rocks covering the UV unit and.... i think the bulb burnt out at some point as it was off anyway. water has been clear for most of the summer once the plants really started growing so hopefully I really won't need it. I've removed the unit altogether and added a union for easy disconnect of the filter box from the piping for the pump so that should make things easier for future maintenance. We're contemplating moving the pond to a different part of the yard and will consider a bog then. seems once the lily pads etc really start growing in, the water clears up quickly, however.
 
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brokensword

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well, after removing the rocks covering the UV unit and.... i think the bulb burnt out at some point as it was off anyway. water has been clear for most of the summer once the plants really started growing so hopefully I really won't need it. I've removed the unit altogether and added a union for easy disconnect of the filter box from the piping for the pump so that should make things easier for future maintenance. We're contemplating moving the pond to a different part of the yard and will consider a bog then. seems once the lily pads etc really start growing in, the water clears up quickly, however.
plants in general, are your friend, though water lilies aren't really the best for clearing the water column; you need fast growing, long rooted floaters, or fast growing, short rooted plants in a bog or along the margin of your pond. Water lilies are working for you as they provide shade against the free floating single cell algae, which is what your UV is aimed at killing (along with a lot of good organisms in your pond!)

IF you do go bog, there's no going back; many many testimonials here at GPF! You DO know we're calling it a cult now, aye? heh heh... :p:cool:


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Looks easy enough.
You just need a flathead and longer tubing. Maybe 2 new metal clamps. Lowes, tsc, other stores will have it.
Light and hanging tubes go into storage for winter.
All my bodies of water go crystal clear in winter. Plants naturally seem to sink down, too.
 

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