Can anyone ID these "grubs" for me?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Mmathis, Mar 30, 2017.

  1. Mmathis

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    They are twice the size (maybe more) than the garden variety grub I'm used to digging up in the yard. I found these today imbedded in a section of an old cut-down tree trunk that I was saving. I turned it over and it disintegrated -- the trunk was at least 12" diameter but there was nothing left of it except sawdust and these guys. To get them all out took some effort and I had to dig to get at a lot of them. There are 76 grubs here (yes, I counted), and if they survive, they'll be turtle food.....BUT WHAT ARE THEY; WHAT KIND OF CRITTER? And don't say Klingon gagh, LOL!


    IMG_6373.JPG IMG_6374.JPG IMG_6377.JPG IMG_6375.JPG IMG_6372.JPG
     
    Mmathis, Mar 30, 2017
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  2. Mmathis

    moby

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    We get Chafer beetles here in the U.K. and their grubs look just like those you've found, but maybe most beetle larvae look similar?
     
    moby, Mar 30, 2017
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  3. Mmathis

    MitchM

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    What about a May beetle grub?
    maybeetle-may-beetle-cockchafer-maybug-larva-grub-larvae-maikfer-feld-FA6109.jpg
     
    MitchM, Mar 30, 2017
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  4. Mmathis

    koiguy1969 GIGGETY-GIGGETY!!

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    Something from ST VOYAGER?... lol
     
    koiguy1969, Mar 30, 2017
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  5. Mmathis

    moby

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    Exactly Mitch, as that's the other common name for our largest UK Chafer beetles! Great minds eh? :)
     
    moby, Mar 30, 2017
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  6. Mmathis

    Meyer Jordan Tadpole

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    What specie of tree was it? Must be the grub of some specie of wood-boring beetle, of which there are quite a few.
     
    Meyer Jordan, Mar 31, 2017
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  7. Mmathis

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    AKA, June bug. But I dig those up in the ground, and these were in a dead tree. Also, these guys were at least twice as big.
    An oak, but not sure what kind: red or white?
    You must have read my FB post, LOL!
     
    Mmathis, Mar 31, 2017
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  8. Mmathis

    Alisonvalley

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    I don't know what species that is. I've dug up similar grubs. Assuming they eat plant roots, I throw them on the driveway, hoping that a passing bird will find'em before they crawl back into the ground.
     
    Alisonvalley, Mar 31, 2017
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  9. Mmathis

    morewater President, Raccoon Haters International

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    Larval stage of June Bug. They're hell on lawns and can destroy vast areas in a short period of time. Some years there's more than in other years.
     
    morewater, Mar 31, 2017
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  10. Mmathis

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    These weren't in the ground -- they were imbedded inside a dead tree trunk. Doubt they are June bug/May beetle larvae. Also, these are much larger.

    I just did a quickie GOOGLE search and the thing that came closest was a stag beetle. More research to be done. If nothing eats them over night [they're in a bucket on the back porch], I'll try to get some better close-up shots. Who would have guessed it, but apparently one way to ID "grubs" has something to do with their anal opening -- and no, I didn't get that up close & personal with these guys!
     
    Mmathis, Mar 31, 2017
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  11. Mmathis

    koiguy1969 GIGGETY-GIGGETY!!

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    Yes mam
     
    koiguy1969, Mar 31, 2017
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  12. Mmathis

    adavisus

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    Shouldn't worry too much about old dead wood boring beetles. Just take for granted they will keep munching that old log until its gone and they move on.

    I've got a big ol' tree, used to be 4' thick down, am toying with making a few soil pockets for arum lilies or ferns in its quietly crumbling mass while the beetle larvae munch on it
     
    adavisus, Mar 31, 2017
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  13. Mmathis

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    @adavisus I'm about convinced now that they are a beneficial, but I become obsessed sometimes to find out "what"...... It's fascinating!

    Based on what I've read on this site http://maria.fremlin.de/stagbeetles/larva-guide/index.html I'm pretty sure it's some type similar to Rose chafer Cetonia aurata (Linnaeus, 1758) (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae), though not necessarily that exact insect.

    I took a few more pics this morning, trying to zero in on certain anatomical features. Maybe these will help. @Tiny Termite, what do you think regarding this US insect larvae? NOT a ground-dwelling larvae.

    IMG_8957.JPG IMG_8961.JPG IMG_8962.JPG IMG_8963.JPG
     
    Mmathis, Mar 31, 2017
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  14. Mmathis

    MitchM

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    You take some pretty good pictures, have you tried using google image search?
    You drag a picture from your desktop into the search field in your browser.
    https://images.google.com
     
    MitchM, Mar 31, 2017
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  15. Mmathis

    adavisus

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    If you google images for 'wood boring beetle larvae' your obsession might spot a few names to look up in wikipedia. There's a lot of creepy crawlies out there, too many to mention! When I see 86,000 species mentioned am in no hurry to greet them by name

    I have no problem with those that dispose of trees that fall over
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2017
    adavisus, Mar 31, 2017
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  16. Mmathis

    bagsmom

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    No information for you, but I feel compelled to say:
    Ick! Gross! Yuck!
     
    bagsmom, Mar 31, 2017
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  17. Mmathis

    Tiny Termite

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    They are Forest Chafers.
     
    Tiny Termite, Apr 10, 2017
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  18. Mmathis

    sissy sissy

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    Grubs bring moles which moles took out my liner when they chewed through it
     
    sissy, Apr 10, 2017
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  19. Mmathis

    budgenator

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    To me it looks like a Japanese beetle larva (I'm not an expert). Jblarva.jpg
    A bacteria called Milky Spore will kill the grubs. The grubs will eat numerous varieties of plant roots and stunt their growth or even kill them outright, probably not what you want in your lawn and flower gardens. Sissy is right, moles eat them and if there is mole food, the moles will come, sometimes right through you pond liner!

    If memory serves me correctly you apply Milky Spore a couple times the first year, then your protected for a long time. Milky Spore only effects grubs so it's very safe.
     
    budgenator, Apr 10, 2017
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  20. Mmathis

    sissy sissy

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    Yep used milky spore all over my yard and a whole container around the pond before I put liners in .I learned my lesson the hard way
     
    sissy, Apr 10, 2017
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