Concrete Pot in Koi Pond?


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Hello, I am admittedly a Newbie to Koi Ponds. I recently bought a Japanese Iris to beautify the margin of my pond. It needs to be partially submerged, and the plastic pot its in is not aesthetically appealing, since it is visible. I am looking into stone pots that are made of Cement, Perlite & Moss. Do you think any of these elements would be harmful to the fish? Thanks :)
 
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They shouldn't be a problem.. but often they ship that stuff from all over the world CHA CHA CHA CHINA and many of their products contain things like lead paint . So if your fish ever start swimming into the walls like a drunk , then it maybe your flower pot as the root cause.
 
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Hello, I am admittedly a Newbie to Koi Ponds. I recently bought a Japanese Iris to beautify the margin of my pond. It needs to be partially submerged, and the plastic pot its in is not aesthetically appealing, since it is visible. I am looking into stone pots that are made of Cement, Perlite & Moss. Do you think any of these elements would be harmful to the fish? Thanks :)
I have a little concrete frog in my pond (it’s head is poping out of the water) and my fish are fine. I did read somewhere along the way that concrete can alter the ph. I haven’t had a problem with this. It probably depends on how many gallons of water and how much concrete you have (my guess). Anyways, if you have a tiny little pond and you put concrete in it (and your ph rises) than take it out. I have a 2,000 gallon pond and my concrete frog Isn’t causing a problem.
 
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Thanks Flipper, I opted for a plastic one that looks like stone....just to be on the safe side :)
 
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That was a great idea! I like smart people lol. I would have done the same thing (hahaha).
 
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Dave Cee

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In the U.S. one can purchase used black plastic nursery pots very cheaply. Depending on how much of the pot is above the waterline these pots have a very unobtrusive appearance in the pond. Or use fired ceramic (clay, Terra cotta).
 
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In the U.S. one can purchase used black plastic nursery pots very cheaply. Depending on how much of the pot is above the waterline these pots have a very unobtrusive appearance in the pond. Or use fired ceramic (clay, Terra cotta).
Great idea!
 
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I've made hypertufa pots in the past (similar to what you are describing) and it is recommended to do a leaching process to reduce the alkalinity of the product. You definitely could do that to be safe. Here is a link about the leaching process:
 
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So, concrete should not touch the water in a pond, to be safe for fish?
 
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I wouldn’t say that - it depends. Concrete can cause problems with the ph (“can” being the keyword) It can make the ph rise. However, I have a concrete statue (small one) in my pond (2,000 gallons) and I haven’t had any problems. If you have a small pond, just be aware that putting concrete in it might cause a problem with the ph. If it does - take it out! It isn’t going to kill your fish unless your ph is off the charts “high” and you do nothing about it.
 
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I've made hypertufa pots in the past (similar to what you are describing) and it is recommended to do a leaching process to reduce the alkalinity of the product. You definitely could do that to be safe. Here is a link about the leaching process:
I remember reading about leaching awhile back. The article you shared reminded me of it. It’s a great idea! Also, I’d never heard of hypertufa pots before. They are adorable! Love them! Thanks for sharing! The article mentions the “being patient” method. That works too but it won’t work if you have fish. Perhaps if you don’t have any fish yet you can go the “being patient” route.
 
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I use the porous planting bags. They are black, flexible and the roots have better access to the nutrient rich water compared to a solid pot.
They have a drawstring at the top to keep the contents in and the bottoms are flat. They stay put, but just to make sure, I tie a string around them and anchor it with a heavy rock on shore.
Aquascape makes them, but there are others.
Depending on the size you buy, you can get a pack of two for about $12 on Amazon.
 

Jhn

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So, concrete should not touch the water in a pond, to be safe for fish?
This is one of those internet myths/wives tales, there isn’t enough lime in concrete to adversely effect ph. I believe it is like one ounce of lime to raise the kh by one point in 4500 gallons, not really going to get that much from a concrete pot.

I poured concrete footers in the pond for the bridge over my pond, did absolutely nothing to the water quality, or the pond inhabitants. Have added cinderblocks etc. in the past to boost plant pots, did nothing.
 
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Hello, I am admittedly a Newbie to Koi Ponds. I recently bought a Japanese Iris to beautify the margin of my pond. It needs to be partially submerged, and the plastic pot its in is not aesthetically appealing, since it is visible. I am looking into stone pots that are made of Cement, Perlite & Moss. Do you think any of these elements would be harmful to the fish? Thanks :)
I wouldn't worry to much about concrete pots. I have a few concrete items in my 12000lt pond including, a solid tall block/plinth to support a concrete lotus water feature, a frog, various besser/cinder blocks to support plants and the ph is very stable. However, I recently took out a water lily that was in a plastic pot and the plastic had peeled badly. Never again will I use plastic if it's not black. I can imagine how my fish have all tried ingesting small pieces of plastic.
 
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