Considering a 24 inch garden pond...need opinions please.


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I love my pond, but it isn't conducive to pond plants and marginals at all. I've enjoyed my deck pond so much this summer and I hate to lose the plants over the winter.

I'm considering digging a small 24 inch garden pond to place the deck pond plants in. Do you think 24 inch depth would be sufficient for my zone 6A's winters? I plan on having water lilies, parrots feather, horse tail and whatever else I bought from @addy1 - LOL !

All I did this summer is put the plants in baskets of kitty litter and add a small pump to circulate the water. Would I need to keep the small pump running over the winter?

Unfortunately the site I'm considering is too far away from the ponds electric, so I'd have to use a heavy duty extension cord and bury it in conduit or some such product.

Appreciate input :) I've never actually dug a pond myself, so would be a first getting liner rocks etc. :) No fish planned for this small pond.
 
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We have seen many ponds in our zone (5B) that are only 24 inches deep and overwinter plants just fine. The secret is to keep them from being exposed to the freezing air - even frozen solid in ice is better than just being out in the open. If they are in pots you can move them to the bottom of the pond. If they are naturalized in the margins of the pond, just make sure the water level doesn't drop and leave them exposed.
 
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@Lisak1 would running a small pump work, or is it the air temperature the plants need protection from ?

My deck pond is in a plastic decorative half barrel from Costco and is only 14 inches tall. Plants have done beautifully in it over the summer and it's brought me much enjoyment. I'm wondering if I could just submerge it into the ground or if 14 inches wouldn't be deep enough?

A few years ago I tried an above ground container bog and lost all the plants over winter :(
 

Mmathis

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Not sure if this would help, but because of my box turtle habitat, I have a sort of “satellite” pond/bog. It isn’t physically connected to the pond, but is connected via PVC tubing. It’s set up like a bog, with an under gravel water distribution manifold and water is pumped in via the main pump (it’s got a splitter). The “return” is also via PVC pipe. It’s hard to describe and even harder to take pictures of. This satellite bog/pond is, of course, enclosed within the turtle habitat, but there’s no reason you couldn’t do something similar. The electric is not an issue since the main pond pump is serving double-duty. Fitting and running the PVC pipe was the only issue. I think I have 1-1/2” going in, and 4” going out (and 2” manifold).

It’s about 6’ x 4’ and roughly 2 to 2-1/2 feet deep. It’s mostly filled with gravel as it’s a bog with a beach area for the turtles. It wasn’t at all hard to dig and line.
 
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if you place hay bales around and over your pot keeping a minimum of 8" of hay all around i'd bet they would winter just fine
 
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Have you thought of a soil pond, no liner?
Mix some bentonite in the top few inches of soil, then you can plant plants right in the base of the pond.
A 24 inch pond sounds like a good size to play around with, if you are so inclined.
I think a solar powered air pump with a battery could work for circulation. A couple of minnows for bug control.
 

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My lily pond is only about 24 inch's deep .I looked into bentonite and even kitty litter but decided it was easier with a liner .I have the preformed pond and may use that also .Funny but at the goodwill I was at to get the fish tank they had 2 preformed ponds that were new because they still had the sticky thing in the bottom with the gallons and name.I also bought a piece of liner there .Not sure the size it is in the wheelbarrow in the basement yet
 
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Interesting idea @MitchM about the bentonite. @Lisak1 the lazy side of me would love to just sink the container.....I measure it and it's only 14 inches deep.....too shallow?

Bales of hay would most definitely attract the attention of my nosey newfoundlands.....they'd have it shredded in no time at all.....unless I fenced in the area. This is like the book " If you Give a Moose a Muffin " only hale bays, then fencing etc ha !

I'm still stymied.
 
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Could you build a sort of temporary greenhouse just for the winter over your existing plant pond? Just a wooden frame of maybe 2"x3" studs and some heavy plastic sheeting so they keep warm and still get sun. Wouldn't be hard or expensive. Just a screw tip on your drill and a staple gun for the plastic. Maybe the triangular shape of a pup tent. The only problem I can see would be how to anchor it so it doesn't just blow away. You don't want to put screws down into your deck. Maybe use rope on 4 sides or 4 corners tied to the railings of the deck.
In the spring, just untie the ropes, tear off the plastic and disassemble the frame with your drill. Mark all the ends of the matching 2x3's so you know how to put it all back together the next fall.
 
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Could you build a sort of temporary greenhouse just for the winter over your existing plant pond? Just a wooden frame of maybe 2"x3" studs and some heavy plastic sheeting so they keep warm and still get sun. Wouldn't be hard or expensive. Just a screw tip on your drill and a staple gun for the plastic. Maybe the triangular shape of a pup tent. The only problem I can see would be how to anchor it so it doesn't just blow away. You don't want to put screws down into your deck. Maybe use rope on 4 sides or 4 corners tied to the railings of the deck.
In the spring, just untie the ropes, tear off the plastic and disassemble the frame with your drill. Mark all the ends of the matching 2x3's so you know how to put it all back together the next fall.
That's a good idea! We already cover the koi pond with a pool solar cover, so this would be pretty easy :)
 

sissy

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pvc and some elbows and the solar covers for swimming pools would work .I have seen some on here that use solar covers .Not sure it would hold up to some of the snow load .Are you planning on keeping the plants outside all winter .I made a dolly for my one stock tank and put some of my plants in it and roll it into the basement .It is the 110 gallon tuff stuff one .I also have a big fish tank on a stand in the basement I got for free and I put plants in that and it is near a basement window
 
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Oops, sorry pics so huge! As you can see it's a small container, the height is only 14 inches high. Pardon the "dog proofing" - LOL !

I stuck the plants in baskets with kitty litter and Osamacote, some stuff is free floating, plugged in a small pump and did absolutely nothing else !
 
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Ahh! So you already have a fence around it. So why not just leave the fence and maybe put a piece of Plexiglas on top and plastic sheeting around the sides and you're good to go for the winter. If you fear this "greenhouse" effect won't keep the plants warm enough, wrap the pot with something to provide insulation. Or maybe add an old filament style light bulb for heat.
 
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Or get some help to drag the pot inside and keep it somewhere it will get enough light.
That pot would be nice if it had wheels. Maybe you can get a round dolly to permanently keep it on. I've seen round dollies used for large garbage cans.
 
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I should have thought about putting it on wheels before I filled it with water. We don't get a lot of sun inside our home and we don't have a walk out basement either. The biggest problem with bringing it inside, besides the fact that it's kind of big to sit in the family room, is our dogs ...there is zero chance they'll leave it alone, hence the ugly fencing around in now :(

I'm leaning towards covering it and keeping the small pump circulating and see what happens over the winter.
 
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