Constructing a rectangular Koi pond with 12 gauge Stainless steel


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Hi I am a Newbie to the Forum and I am at the initial stage of deciding what material to use to build the pond. Dimensions are Length 16' x Width 8.2' and depth 4'. The stainless steel thickness is 12 gauge. The pond or tank will have its walls supported by welded square tubing to at 4 locations 1 feet part starting at the base vertically going upwards ending at the lip of the Tank at the Top. I am also considering coating the inside walls of the tank with a fish safe waterproof membrane ( spray or paint method to ensure there the weld joints of the tank is sealed ( not sure of this is necessary ) . A large hole will be created and be lined with waterproof membrane , so that there is no reaction of the soil to the stainless steel tank . The hole will be compacted and levelled prior to placing the tank. The portion of the tank above the ground will be covered with brick work to cover with nice brick work and forming a ledge to sit and watch.

Some questions :
1) have anyone considered stainless steel as a pond/tank construction Vs rubber liners, concrete or Fibre glass ( with rising cost )
2) I am not sure if the gauge thickness and welding joints can take the water pressure - although I am using welded square tubing ( GAUGE 11 wall thickness ) welded at corners all round the tank. ( if this is necessary )
3) Stainless steel can be welded or holes cut to provide for pipe fittings and drainage ( at bottom ) for screw type coupling or welded to stainless steel spout for filters and pump which I am yet to work on - would appreciate advise on the pumps and filter ( especially capacity of pumps and size of filter
4) I live in Australia - Perth mild winter -1 to 12 deg C at night and summers 30 to 39 deg C, thus will the coating membrane beside providing waterproof sealing for the joints also provide insulation during winter and summer - given that stainless steel is a better conductor of heat transfer compared to rubber liner or concrete.
5) If anyone have pond design as to location, type and size/capacity of mechanical filter, bio filter, UV lamp , sediment settling , skimmer, drain or overflow and water level float fittings arrangement, I would appreciate -

Appreciate your feedback and guidance.

Thanks
 

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Welcome to the GPF! I have no clue about the construction materials you are proposing, but I'm sure someone here will hop in with some ideas!
 

j.w

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and welcome @Stay
Well it would last forever if it could stand the pressure from all that water! I don't really know anything about doing this tho.
 

sissy

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Welcome and not sure is it going to be above or below ground .Heat transfer could be a problem .I have a stainless steel bowl that I use as decoration and to hold some water plants and had to give up on it because water got really hot and cooked the plants .I got it free from the dump and thought WOW I found a treasure but WOW I did not find much of a treasure .SAD TO SAY .I may use it as a form to make a concrete bowl .It is pretty big stainless steel bowl , but will look pretty as concrete in my yard as yard art ,Water for the deer also
 

Mmathis

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Hello and welcome!

I don’t have any knowledge of or advice for you — sorry! And I can’t download your attachment, either.

Is this pond going to be above ground or below ground? If it’s below ground, the hole you dig is the “support” for the liner. If it’s partially above and below, many people use concrete for extra support.
 
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Welcome Stay! What an interesting project. I am having a hard time with the 'why' of this project unless you have a bunch of free stainless steel looking for a purpose. Seems like a pond liner would be so much easier. Anyway, welcome and please let us know how the pond turns out.
 
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I'm not trying to disrespect your ideas, but it seems you are creating a lot of work and needing to acquire elaborate materials to accomplish it. Welding, steel supports, coating the interior, laying a membrane underneath to isolate the stainless from the soil, etc.

You stated you would add a membrane to protect the stainless steel basin. Why not just lay an EPDM liner in the excavation and be done with it? No need for fabricating the stainless steel basin. No need to coat the interior of the basin. Just a conventional rubber lined pond.

If you're looking for it to be part above and part below grade, you can build a couple of coarses of cement blocks with rebar pounded into the ground within the cavities. Fill the cavities with concrete. Others have done this. Decorative stone can be applied to face the block.

If your planning it your way because you want to create something out of the ordinary or challenging, I understand that.
 
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Thanks J.W. now I see what @Stay is planning. Interesting. You know, it reminds me of a stainless steel swimming pool I used to do laps in. Super easy to clean and lasts forever.
 
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Thanks so much and appreciate the feedback and frank advice. It seems that the liner approach would be cheaper option and having to accept the folds of the liner would be visible in the clear water with the approach . I am also slightly concern with leaks at the liner cut outs at the fittings interface which I am not familiar as to how to solve - perhaps more learning watching videos of liner installs - any recommendation on videos that I can learnt this .
Short of ordering a “swimming pool” , I was hoping that the Stainless steel tank for Koi would be the go in between answer and hopefully a less expensive option ( vs fibreglass pool ) and aesthetically pleasing . Acknowledge that liner approach would be the cheapest. Welcome any feedback. Thanks again. Simon
 
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@Stay So you have experience with ponds and koi-keeping, or will this be your first time?
I have past experiences with fishes, turtles and large glass aquariums aquariums, however, I have not built a pond in an outdoor setting given the elements we have to deal with. I also DIY and enjoy the process to to trying out different approaches , however, I do recognise that we can learn from each other experiences and why I join the forum and keep the interest momentum going. Thanks.
 
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Thanks J.W. now I see what @Stay is planning. Interesting. You know, it reminds me of a stainless steel swimming pool I used to do laps in. Super easy to clean and lasts forever.
Thanks for the note, That is exactly what I am after , easy to clean and lasting forever. I believe there is much effort to set up the pool and keep it stable once it is in the ground. May I ask , what is the size of the Swimming pool LxBxH approx and what Stainless steel thickness . Also was the tank supported with brick wall or stiffeners or Standalone Stainless steel tank besides the soil ?

Did you have any barrier to the between the soil and the stainless steel wall to prevent an acidic reaction ?

Appreciate your feedback.
 
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Hi I am a Newbie to the Forum and I am at the initial stage of deciding what material to use to build the pond. Dimensions are Length 16' x Width 8.2' and depth 4'. The stainless steel thickness is 12 gauge. The pond or tank will have its walls supported by welded square tubing to at 4 locations 1 feet part starting at the base vertically going upwards ending at the lip of the Tank at the Top. I am also considering coating the inside walls of the tank with a fish safe waterproof membrane ( spray or paint method to ensure there the weld joints of the tank is sealed ( not sure of this is necessary ) . A large hole will be created and be lined with waterproof membrane , so that there is no reaction of the soil to the stainless steel tank . The hole will be compacted and levelled prior to placing the tank. The portion of the tank above the ground will be covered with brick work to cover with nice brick work and forming a ledge to sit and watch.

Some questions :
1) have anyone considered stainless steel as a pond/tank construction Vs rubber liners, concrete or Fibre glass ( with rising cost )
2) I am not sure if the gauge thickness and welding joints can take the water pressure - although I am using welded square tubing ( GAUGE 11 wall thickness ) welded at corners all round the tank. ( if this is necessary )
3) Stainless steel can be welded or holes cut to provide for pipe fittings and drainage ( at bottom ) for screw type coupling or welded to stainless steel spout for filters and pump which I am yet to work on - would appreciate advise on the pumps and filter ( especially capacity of pumps and size of filter
4) I live in Australia - Perth mild winter -1 to 12 deg C at night and summers 30 to 39 deg C, thus will the coating membrane beside providing waterproof sealing for the joints also provide insulation during winter and summer - given that stainless steel is a better conductor of heat transfer compared to rubber liner or concrete.
5) If anyone have pond design as to location, type and size/capacity of mechanical filter, bio filter, UV lamp , sediment settling , skimmer, drain or overflow and water level float fittings arrangement, I would appreciate -

Appreciate your feedback and guidance.

Thanks
that is a unique and totally kickass idea. it will cost more and look great. i am a welder and could weld up a pool in one afternoon so it would not cost me much labor. but the stainless would break the bank. but it would look oh so sweet.
 
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I like your stainless steel idea. That is if it were a raised pond where the stainless steel were viewed as a work of art.
The material will be quite expensive and it would be ashamed to hide it underground.
As I stated previously, you're planning on a membrane, then the stainless steel, then a waterproof coating inside the stainless. Seems like there are three liners in that plan.

That being said...
Pond liners have been used for many years and if you choose the right liner, it will last a very long time. EPDM 45 mil. thick is the choice of most. They do make a thicker 60 mil., it's your choice... but that might be overkill. An underlayment is installed first, then the liner. You can buy the underlayment, it's not expensive, or you can use many other materials such as carpet, carpet padding, etc. Do not use a cheap PVC liner.

Dont worry about the folds or creases. If done properly, they shouldn't be that noticable. There are ways to hide any exposed liner that is above the waterline. Many of us have lined ponds that look almost natural.
 

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