Copper Flower Pot Weir

Discussion in 'DIY - Do It Yourself' started by linc2010, May 23, 2010.

  1. linc2010

    linc2010

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    We decided to use a copper flower-pot for the weir. We cut a hole in the back and ground it smooth. We used a bulk-head fitting out the back to the pump plumbing. All along the square pot is an inward, 1/2" angle in toward the middle as a slanted inward rim. We cut the front two angles of the rim and bent the lip front down to make the shelf the water falls over. But we didn't account for the new angle of the lip and the gap between the rest of the rim and the lip that water loves to follow down into my dirt and onto the top paver above the waterlin, and all along the front and sides of the tile waterfall weir box we built!!! :p

    Update: silicone around the lip and in the gaps and sides of the square waterfall weir. It is losing 2" inches of water overnight!!!!ARRRRGGGGG :cheerful: back to the drawing board.
     
    linc2010, May 23, 2010
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  2. linc2010

    DoDad

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    Copper is bad for fish.
     
    DoDad, May 24, 2010
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  3. linc2010

    koikeepr

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    I agree with DoDad. The metal makeup of copper does not work in an aquarium/pond setting with fish. And if you ever have to add salt, God help you.

    Avoid the copper.
     
    koikeepr, May 24, 2010
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  4. linc2010

    DrDave Innovator Moderator

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    Copper in water equates to copper sulphate which is a poison. It is used to control algae in controlled amounts. Not good for fish in excess.
     
    DrDave, May 24, 2010
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  5. linc2010

    DoDad

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    My wife brought home a very large copper pitcher from a garage sale and someday ?I will make a water feature with it,
     
    DoDad, May 24, 2010
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  6. linc2010

    koikeepr

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    Yeah, copper is beautiful and goes beautifully with water--as long as there is no living creature in it.
     
    koikeepr, May 25, 2010
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  7. linc2010

    Airic

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    I don't think copper sulfate is dangerous for the fish and actually if I remember it is beneficial and used for an all around preventative treatment for Ich, parasites and such. Only in high dosages it can be bad.

    It is bad for plants as it disrupts photosynthesis which is great for killing algae.

    I think copper sulfate a derived when an electrical current is applied to copper and it creates a blue crystallization.

    As for just plain old copper I don’t know for sure but everyone fills their pond up from the copper pipes in their home.
     
    Airic, May 25, 2010
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  8. linc2010

    DrDave Innovator Moderator

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    Small amounts of copper may not be bad. That said, electrolysis occurs when dissimilar metals come into contact with water.
     
    DrDave, May 25, 2010
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  9. linc2010

    DoDad

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    copper can start to be deadly for koi @ 0.03 ppm
     
    DoDad, May 25, 2010
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  10. linc2010

    DrCase Moderator Moderator

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    I made a 2' long spillway out of a 2 1/2" copper pipe i flattened it out and welded copper pipe beading on the sides
    it has been in my pond for a long time ,way before i read how bad it was ..
    its still is a spill way for one of my filter returns to my pond
    it has a good slime coat on it ...one day i may use a flat rock
     
    DrCase, May 26, 2010
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  11. linc2010

    linc2010

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    Does water running over copper metal dissolve it? Does it turn into ionic copper?

    Good point about out salt koi keeper. I'll use a medicine tank if I use salt, followed by a freshwater(pond water) dip before putting them back into the pond. I'll check with my buddies at The John G. Shedd Aquarium; they are aquarists there. They'll probably laugh at me for making such a mistake. What metal are professional weirs made of for formal ponds? It looked like copper to me:rolleyes::confused:
     
    linc2010, May 27, 2010
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  12. linc2010

    koikeepr

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    Perhaps it isn't copper? Ask them what it's made out of. It's pretty hard to mistake that shiny penny color.
     
    koikeepr, May 27, 2010
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  13. linc2010

    linc2010

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    It is definitely copper, but it may be coated, maybe that is our saving grace. If not I will out and get the right weir for fish. Our little comets seem to be doing well so far. Thanks I appreciate the feedback.:confused:
     
    linc2010, May 27, 2010
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  14. linc2010

    Squidhead

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    If you are still concerned you can get an epoxy to coat the copper, but......


    As DoDad pointed out there is a a level at which copper becomes toxic to fish. I have heard so many conflicting levels at which it may be toxic. However with all that said copper or copper sulphate is also a trace element for plants and fish. Check out your fish food ingredients. Check any trace element fertilizer you use for plants. It's when the levels are raised to extremes. I was concerned with copper levels in my water at one time. I had very acidic well water, 3.8 - 4.5 depending on the time of year. I had an older home that was built before plastic pipe was legal for use and had copper pipe for water supply. The well water was so corrosive that myself and neighbors pipes would get pinholes in them. I got 2 different copper tests and neither one detected any copper. Copper is a trace element in all fish fresh cold water and tropical as well as marine. Invertabraes are most sensitive to low "toxic" levels of copper. When you get certain algae, snail and ICH solutions for ponds they are copper sulphate. The idea is to raise the level high enough to kill whatever your target is, but keep it low enough to keep fish "safe".
     
    Squidhead, Jun 6, 2010
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  15. linc2010

    linc2010

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    Thanks Squid! I agree. I will monitor all the importnat levels. We keep marine fish, invertebrates and corals in our aquarium tank. So far our water has not been an issue. So using LOA *ommmm* our water is wonderful! LOL

    We are planting lotus tomorrow. One near Buda see video of this below:

    [ame]
     
    linc2010, Jun 6, 2010
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  16. linc2010

    DrDave Innovator Moderator

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    Very nice! how will the electrical meters be read? :alieneyesa: Does the power company know they have to stand in a pond if service is needed? :yikesu:
     
    DrDave, Jun 6, 2010
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  17. linc2010

    linc2010

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    Thanks for the nice compliment!

    I hear this concern a lot. There is a ledge that they can stand on. I do it all the time. Their problem will be finding it once the dark, red clamatis and vines grow over it from below, and the white flowers and vines grow over it from above. I'll help them find it if they have problems. They can also hold onto the poles in the wall too, as I do if I need more stability. They only come out when we have new tenants. They usually come to the front door to get me before they do a reading.
     
    linc2010, Jun 6, 2010
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