Copper pipe

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Hi Everyone or anyone,

I bought some copper pipe to run from my pond to what I call a water plant filter. A friend said the salt, which is just aquarium salt in the pond will corrode the copper really fast. Is this true? Should I skip the copper and use plastic pipe?
 
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sissy

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yep I had a water softner installed in NJ home and found out what even that can do to copper after my finished basement flooded .Copper can be bad for fish also .I was surprised in a bad way .Maybe that is another reason for pex in houses
 
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yep I had a water softner installed in NJ home and found out what even that can do to copper after my finished basement flooded .Copper can be bad for fish also .I was surprised in a bad way .Maybe that is another reason for pex in houses
Thanks for your reply. Does pex have pcb or anything that's bad for people or fish?
 

sissy

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I guess not because we drink the water from it and it is used in houses now because it is easy to install and is supposed to be safe /.If you look at everything in a whole at what is safe and what is not .More not than is ,look at coated cookware
 
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I guess not because we drink the water from it and it is used in houses now because it is easy to install and is supposed to be safe /.If you look at everything in a whole at what is safe and what is not .More not than is ,look at coated cookware
I know! We don't use coated cookware at all! I just did a google search on PEX and didn't find anything negative. Thanks for your reply.
 
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I need to reiterate what @MitchM said - salt will kill your plants. Salt is not recommended in a freshwater pond with plants.
I've put salt in my pond for almost twenty years and the plants and fish look vigorous and happy. I think the lack of salt is not good for the fish. About twenty years ago I had sickly fish and some of them died. A fellow at a local aquarium store said with apparent knowledge that they needed salt. I added salt and the the ones that were still alive became well and all the fish and plants I've had since then have done very well.
 
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I won't refute your real life experience.

What's your pond like? How many gallons? How many fish and what kind? What kind of filtration? What level of salinity do you maintain?
 
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I think what most people would really be curious about is the salt levels. Just saying the word salt probably makes most people think of the salt on the road during a winter storm or ocean water. The salt levels I use as per instructions on the aquarium salt container's label are quite low.

I thought I was the only one who had never heard about salt in one's pond back when my fish were sick. It's on the shelf at pond stores, walmart and online. I ran into a pond person just after I had started using salt and he knew about the lack of salt making fish sick, knew what the malady was called and made me think I was the only one who had never heard about it.

You can't use just any salt, it needs to be aquarium salt to be sure it's the right kind. My pond is small, about 250 gallons and has a separate 100 gallon tank full of pond plants, primarily papyrus or umbrella plants but also elephant ears, lilies and cattails. I use a small pond pump from the pond to the plant tank with a simple media filter. Oh, since raccoons feast on pond fish, I buy goldfish and not koi.
 

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@Bill Baty While I appreciate your information, please don’t tell people that “aquarium salt” is the only type of salt to use — because it isn’t. Any salt should be added by weight. I use plain old non-iodized table salt, but I only use it as a dip or treatment — not in the pond. It’s good that you don’t have koi — your pond isn’t big enough for koi.
 

addy1

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Welcome to our forum! Use plastic pipe as stated above.

We have soft acidic well water, had copper pipes they started getting pin hole leaks, all replaced with pvc now.
 
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've put salt in my pond for almost twenty years and the plants and fish look vigorous and happy. I think the lack of salt is not good for the fish.
And I've never added salt to my pond in 7 years and my plants and fish ALSO look vigorous and happy. Again - I'm not trying to argue with you and the success you've had, just wanting to keep the topic of "should I salt my pond" balanced for others who may read this in the future. I think this is where the phrase "correlation does not equal causation" comes into play. My mom will frequently say "well, we did A, B and C when you were kids and you turned out fine!" In her mind that means driving around with no seatbelts, no infant car seats, and smoking while your kids are in the car is perfectly safe. I remind her that "when we know better, we do better". Science advances, thought processes change, we learn from experience. Know better - do better.

I'm not saying salt isn't useful in fish care - it certainly can be. But there's lots of research that shows that freshwater fish do not benefit from constant exposure to salt. Many of the articles that you read say pond fish will "tolerate" low levels of salt. And many recommend getting the salt out of the pond after you have treated for parasites or bacteria.

Here are a few interesting points from an article that is mainly in favor of using salt in a pond:

"Salt is an irritant to the skin of the koi. As a reaction to the irritant the koi will grow additional slime coat."

So using salt to increase the slime coat can be helpful, but that can be done with a salt dip as needed - not necessary to salt the whole pond. The idea of constantly being in an environment that is basically irritating to your skin doesn't sound pleasant to me, though.

"Salt definitely has it's time and place in koi keeping. It can be very useful in treating stressed, sick and new koi and it can also be great at controlling parasites. However it is NOT a good idea to leave salt in your koi pond all year long. There are no real health concerns from long term salt use in a koi pond, but the problem occurs with parasites. If salt is used year round, parasites can build up a resistance to salt and you end up with these super bugs. Then you will have a much harder time later trying to kill off parasites and even more drastic measures have to be taken".

This reminds me of our overuse of antibiotics which is leading to the creation of superbugs that can't be touched by any medicine that we currently have. Things that used to be easy to treat are becoming life-threatening as a result.

And I don't necessarily agree with the statement "there are no real health concerns" - for the following reason:

"Salt will never dissipate. If the water level drops from evaporation, the salt will only become more concentrated. The only way to remove salt is to drain water from the koi pond and replace with new water."

So add salt to your pond and you now have to be concerned with evaporation leading to high salinity which IS a health concern for fish. Now you are committed to regular water changes which have also proven to be stressful for fish - but that's another subject!

This is also worth considering:

"Salt also has uses in parasite control. However this will require much higher doses of salt. Usually in the neighborhood of .5% to .6% salt. This is around 5 pounds per 100 gallons of water. Now that's a lot of salt! You may find some literature out there that says .3% salt will kill parasites, but check the date on that information. 10 years ago .3% salt did kill parasites, however due to its heavy use by breeders, many strains of parasites have developed a resistance to salt. So now much higher levels of salt must be used. I am sure 10 years from now salt will be completely useless at killing parasites, but for now .6% for around 2 weeks will kill many types of parasites. Salt however will not kill flukes, anchor worms or lice."

You could never add enough salt to your pond to medicate your fish and not kill your plants at the same time. Dead plants aren't helpful in a pond. Again - a salt dip or a hospital tank makes way more sense for treating sick fish than does salting your whole pond.

In fact the author goes on to say:

"Salt will kill most plants. You will need to remove any potted or floating plants before adding salt."

I guess that would work if your plants are all potted and easy to remove. But if you have naturalized your plants or you're using a constructed wetland filter on your pond, salt in the pond will put an end to that.

Again - not trying to tell anyone else what they should do with their pond. Just adding to the conversation with a different perspective. The whole topic of salt in the garden pond has seen a bit of an uptick here of late, which is interesting!

Here's the article I pulled quotes from if anyone is interested:

http://www.simikoi.com/Salt-in-Koi-Ponds/Salt-in-Koi-Ponds-p-358.html
 

sissy

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Had the same happen to my fridge like addy ,only a year old and not sure how long it was leaking and had lots of pinholes in it .Lucky insurance covered it since it was a hidden leak .I have talked to people and heard them tell me that a pond store told them they needed a 20 lb bag of salt in a 1000 gallon pond and the fish suffered and the plants died .They bought the bag of salt from a well known pond store here .I was surprised when they came to my little pond group at the garden center and told us this .
 
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I did a fast google search for "how much salt to add to a garden pond and found the following “advice”:

2.5 cups per 100 gallons
1.25 cups per 100 gallons
1-3 pounds per 100 gallons
1/2 gallon per 550 gallons
Minimum one pound to maximum 2.5 pounds per 100 gallons

Pretty much seems like no one really knows. If this was a recipe, the results would be a disaster.
 

Mmathis

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I did a fast google search for "how much salt to add to a garden pond and found the following “advice”:

2.5 cups per 100 gallons
1.25 cups per 100 gallons
1-3 pounds per 100 gallons
1/2 gallon per 550 gallons
Minimum one pound to maximum 2.5 pounds per 100 gallons

Pretty much seems like no one really knows. If this was a recipe, the results would be a disaster.
Oh my!
 
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