Difference between Shubunkin and Comet?

Discussion in 'Fish & Koi Talk' started by michey1st, Jul 31, 2014.

  1. michey1st

    michey1st

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    On a whim, I stopped at an aquarium store yesterday and picked up two new fishies! The kid at the store wasn't sure if they were "Calico Comets" or Shubunkin -- said something about them being too young to tell the difference yet. Is there a difference between the two or are they the same thing? The things labeled as "Shubunkin" were twice the price and larger -- these guys were in an unlabeled tank.

    They are about 3 inches in size, and have white, black, orange and blue coloration. No pics as of yet because they are being all fraidy-cat of me still. Google tells me a shubunkin is the same as a comet but with calico colors. Is there no such thing as a "Calico Comet"? Or is the problem that they may change to solid orange as they mature?

    Total fish newb here, educate me?
     
    michey1st, Jul 31, 2014
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  2. michey1st

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    In a nut shell, a Shubunkin is a comet with those colors. Some young fish [comets] will start out calico-colored, but will lose that as they grow. Shubies won't lose their colors, though they might change some over time. No such thing as a "calico comet."

    But if they had the "blue" coloration, they probably were Shubies.
     
    Mmathis, Jul 31, 2014
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  3. michey1st

    michey1st

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    Ahhh, THAT makes sense, thank you so much!
     
    michey1st, Aug 1, 2014
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  4. michey1st

    CometKeith

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    I think I have read that shubunkins by definition must have some red coloration. If yours don't have red then they can't be called shubunkins hence "calico comets" !
     
    CometKeith, Aug 1, 2014
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  5. michey1st

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

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    I have some blue, some sunrise subbies, some with only orange and blues, some with reds. Don't think they must have red to be shubunkins.

    Capture5.JPG Capture6.JPG Capture7.JPG
    "Unlike standard shubunkins, Ozark’s Sunrise Shubunkins do not have red, orange or black markings. Sunrise Shubunkins have transparent scales which allows their pink gills to show through, as well as a light blue body. Most also have solid black eyes."

    [​IMG]

    "Shubunkins are similar to the common goldfish and comet goldfish in appearance. They were first bred in Japan, from mutations in telescope eye goldfish (Demekins) c. 1900. They have streamlined bodies with well-developed and even fins. However, the shubunkins are calico goldfish; they possess nacreous scales (a mix of metallic and transparent scales that are pearly in appearance). The overlapping patches of red, white, blue, grey and black (along with dark speckles) normally extend to the finnage of shubunkins. Blue is the most prized colour in shubunkins. Calico originally denoted three coloured varieties of goldfish that did not include blue. The best blues are produced from line breeding of good blue specimens of shubunkins. Sometimes good blues may be obtained by breeding bronze (metallic) with pink (matte) goldfish, but a grey slate colour may result instead.Some Calico fish tend to have a pointy mouth.

    It may take several months for the nacreous coloration to develop on a young fry (baby fish). Shubunkins are excellent pond fish because they reach a length of 9 to 18 inches (23 to 41 centimeters) at adulthood. A shubunkin goldfish is considered an adult at 2 to 3 years of age,[1][2] even though they live much longer."
     
    addy1, Aug 1, 2014
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  6. michey1st

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    And I thought it was the "blue" or black....
     
    Mmathis, Aug 1, 2014
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  7. michey1st

    ZmanArt007 Fish Keeper and Filmmaker

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    Anyone know how color dominances work between Subs and Comets? If the two breed would you get more shubunkins, comets, or mixtures of the two? Or would the babies be all olive or black?
     
    ZmanArt007, Aug 1, 2014
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  8. michey1st

    fishin4cars True friends just call me Larkin Moderator

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    Shubunkins were originally three colored comets, Calico started being used when there was two colors that were spotted on the fish. Now, there are so many variations and people have applied names to there genetic line that there are no more clear cut and defined definitions between Calico and a shubunkin. IMO, shubunkin should have red, and should have at least two other colors. As for the question of dominant, Comets would be more dominant, The more common the line the more likely that most fry would take the more wild side. But using a comet has it's benefits when trying to work with fin age and tails because the comet is dominate.
     
    fishin4cars, Aug 1, 2014
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  9. michey1st

    IPA

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    Are both fish shubunkin?
     
    IPA, Aug 30, 2017
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  10. michey1st

    sissy sissy

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    Maybe it is the shape of the body also .My koi and fancy tails changed color a lot when they were young but as they got older the color settled in as yellow for most of the fancy tails .Not sure how they got to yellow but they did .
     
    sissy, Aug 30, 2017
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  11. michey1st

    Gemma

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    Since you guys are discussing Shubunkins...what is their life expectancy?
    My 2 long fin shubs are anywhere from 8 to 10 yrs old, they are active and seem healthy, but this year they seem to have slowed down a bit, I thought maybe they're getting old.
     
    Gemma, Aug 31, 2017
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  12. michey1st

    Nyboy

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    Have heard them called poor man's Koi
     
    Nyboy, Aug 31, 2017
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  13. michey1st

    Faebinder

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    Why would their be a difference in life expectancy between shubunkins and comets. Honestly if I had to be pick the toughest type of goldfish it would be shubunkins... those punks rule all goldfish ponds. All attitude. Like a herd of cats.
     
    Faebinder, Sep 1, 2017
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  14. michey1st

    sissy sissy

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    They are also jumpers ,that is the reason I gave my 2 away .Pond they are in has higher sides and is 12 thousand gallons
     
    sissy, Sep 1, 2017
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  15. michey1st

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    I would say that they are both Shubies. Pretty fish!
    I didn't get that the life expectancy question was for Shubunkin vs. comets, but just in general.
    Just looked that up, and they can live 25-30 years. Yours are hitting middle-age. We all slow down a little bit, LOL!
     
    Mmathis, Sep 1, 2017
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  16. michey1st

    j.w I Love my Goldies

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    I bought 6 of those Shubbies a few years ago and I love them. I love my regular comets also but boy if I had it to do over my pond would be full of the Shubbies and just a minimum of the comets.
     
    j.w, Sep 1, 2017
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  17. michey1st

    sissy sissy

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    I would love all fat fantails .They are just too cute
     
    sissy, Sep 1, 2017
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  18. michey1st

    j.w I Love my Goldies

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    I've never had fantails in my pond. I think they are really neat looking tho!
     
    j.w, Sep 1, 2017
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  19. michey1st

    Gemma

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    @Mmathis Thank you!
    I tried googling myself, and of course I got different answers on every site, average being 10yrs, which seemed a bit low to me.

    I'm glad my boys have a long way to go still, I love'em! :)
     
    Gemma, Sep 2, 2017
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  20. michey1st

    j.w I Love my Goldies

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    Here's a nice story about some old goldfish:

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    After 35 years a golden oldie turns up his fins: Britain's oldest goldfish, Splash, loses lifelong tank buddy, Splish (Or will he have forgotten about it in three seconds?)
    • Pair were won at a funfair in Brockworth, Gloucestershire, in 1977
    • Splish passed away last weekend leaving Splash alone for first time
    • Owner Richard Wright: 'He looks as if he's coping fine'
    By
    Steve Robson

    Published: 13:27 EDT, 18 April 2013 | Updated: 18:39 EDT, 18 April 2013

    When his children brought two goldfish home from the fair in a water-filled plastic bag, Richard Wright thought they might survive for a few months.

    But for 35 years, Splish and Splash proved him wrong … until this week, when Splish sadly departed this world for that great big fishbowl in the sky.

    It means Splash, believed to be Britain’s oldest living goldfish, is alone for the first time since 1977.
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    End of an era: Splish (left) died on Sunday leaving Splash (right) alone for the first time in 35 years

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    Happier times: Splish and Splash had been companions for more than 35 years after being brought home from a funfair

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    Flying solo: Splash is now living alone for the first time in more than three decades

    Mr Wright, 68, said: ‘I found Splish floating dead in the bowl. Splash looks as if he is coping fine and he’s just swimming around as normal.’

    ‘It was actually quite sad to see him go, because we’d known him for so long... more than half my lifetime.’

    He and his wife Ann had looked after the two fish ever since their children Hayley and Matthew, then aged six and nine, won them at the fair.

    Mr Wright, a retired human resources consultant from Brockworth, Gloucestershire, said: ‘We certainly didn’t expect them to live this long – it’s incredible. The children eventually grew up and left home but Splish and Splash stayed put with us. The kids are in their forties now.’

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    Gold oldies: Splish and Splash had lost some of their gold colouring over the years but were otherwise healthy

    Mr Wright said there was no particular secret to their longevity: ‘We just fed them normal goldfish food, but they have thrived on it.’

    In the last three or four years they had finally begun to show their age, however, losing their gold colour and turning silver.

    Splish and Splash shared the same bowl for more than two decades. Around ten years ago they moved house – into a new tank equipped with a filter, which Mr Wright nicknamed the ‘Old Fish Home’.

    [​IMG]

    Shocked: Richard Wright had expected the fish to live for no more than a few years after winning them at a funfair with his children in 1977

    Common goldfish normally live for between five and 15 years. Those kept in small tanks, like Splish and Splash, are not generally expected to live for more than ten.

    But Splash still has a long way to go to beat the world record holder – Tish, a goldfish which died at the grand old age of 43 in 2005.
     
    j.w, Sep 2, 2017
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