Does anybody eat string algae?


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I bought a bundle of watercress at the grocer, it is now taking over the pond.
 
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brokensword

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And it helps keep away the algae
in a world of 'gone wild', I'd rather deal with algae than cattails any day! There's a lot of other plants good for your pond and that are not so hard to eradicate should you turn your back to them, than cattails...
 
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is there any chance they'd transmit disease to the koi?
Not that I've ever heard. They are fun to have in the pond - they're quite large, so you'll spot them by following the "trails" they leave as they clean off the rocks.
 
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in a world of 'gone wild', I'd rather deal with algae than cattails any day! There's a lot of other plants good for your pond and that are not so hard to eradicate should you turn your back to them, than cattails...
Agree!

And while watercress may take over, it's extremely easy to yank out by the armful and it's tasty and good for you, too!
 
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in a world of 'gone wild', I'd rather deal with algae than cattails any day! There's a lot of other plants good for your pond and that are not so hard to eradicate should you turn your back to them, than cattails...
These are narrow leaf cattails, Typha angustifolia, a bit smaller than the common Typha latifolia, i've got them in plastic fibre bags and the pond has a butyl liner, i do think I have them under control. Seems they've finally started absorbing the koi poo this spring.
 

brokensword

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These are narrow leaf cattails, Typha angustifolia, a bit smaller than the common Typha latifolia, i've got them in plastic fibre bags and the pond has a butyl liner, i do think I have them under control. Seems they've finally started absorbing the koi poo this spring.
they're like the Weeping Angels from Dr. Who; don't turn your back on them.;)
 
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@kaari, I'm also in San Jose, and have also had an issue with string algae this spring. I have a lot of underwater plants in the pond (don't have a good shelf so no bog plants), but also have many fish (goldfish & minnows), which I suspect have multiplied and may be overpowering the plants.
For the first time, I ordered snails, which should be coming soon and I'm hoping will help fight the algae and not hurt the pond. Also, I had replaced my two filter materials a while back, and I don't think I put enough filter material into the top layer, meaning some water was coming through without always being filtered. This past weekend I smushed in another piece of filter to make it tighter, which I think/hope is helping curtail the algae too.
 

brokensword

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@kaari, I'm also in San Jose, and have also had an issue with string algae this spring. I have a lot of underwater plants in the pond (don't have a good shelf so no bog plants), but also have many fish (goldfish & minnows), which I suspect have multiplied and may be overpowering the plants.
For the first time, I ordered snails, which should be coming soon and I'm hoping will help fight the algae and not hurt the pond. Also, I had replaced my two filter materials a while back, and I don't think I put enough filter material into the top layer, meaning some water was coming through without always being filtered. This past weekend I smushed in another piece of filter to make it tighter, which I think/hope is helping curtail the algae too.
well, you can't filter out algae; not the free floating kind. And if you're trying to filter the string algae, I imagine that's going to make a mess of your filter. Best to just get a cheap toilet brush and wind it up out of your pond. Having a lot of plants (floaters and/or marginals) help keep the string algae at bay as they out-compete it.

Consider a bog too; even more benefits as you'll not ever need to worry about filter pads or cleaning them.
 
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@kaari, I'm also in San Jose, and have also had an issue with string algae this spring. I have a lot of underwater plants in the pond (don't have a good shelf so no bog plants), but also have many fish (goldfish & minnows), which I suspect have multiplied and may be overpowering the plants.
For the first time, I ordered snails, which should be coming soon and I'm hoping will help fight the algae and not hurt the pond. Also, I had replaced my two filter materials a while back, and I don't think I put enough filter material into the top layer, meaning some water was coming through without always being filtered. This past weekend I smushed in another piece of filter to make it tighter, which I think/hope is helping curtail the algae too.
What sorts of underwater plants are growing there? As I mentioned on a previous post, this year there's been peculiar weather: hot in January, cold in late March, the string algae got a head start on the larger plants I've got such Typha angustifolia (Narrow leaf Cattail). My perception is that, as the weather settles, the larger plants will start taking up the phosphorus and other fish poo excess and your pond will stabilize.
 
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My perception is that, as the weather settles, the larger plants will start taking up the phosphorus and other fish poo excess and your pond will stabilize.
100% correct. In the meantime, consider that algae a great helper for your pond, keeping your water healthy for your fish.

And @bonnie4747 - snails are a fun addition to a pond, but don't expect them to make much of an impact on your algae. Don't get me wrong - they will eat it. You'll see clean trails on rocks and surfaces where they have been. But you'd need an army of them to eat the amount of algae you can grow in a pond. And they don't address string algae at all - they snack on the stuff that grows on the rocks, typically referred to as carpet algae.
 
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brokensword

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100% correct. In the meantime, consider that algae a great helper for your pond, keeping your water healthy for your fish.

And @bonnie4747 - snails are a fun addition to a pond, but don't expect them to make much of an impact on your algae. Don't get me wrong - they will eat it. You'll see clean trails on rocks and surfaces where they have been. But you'd need an army of them to eat the amount of algae you can grow in a pond. And they don't address string algae at all - they snack on the stuff that grows on the rocks, typically referred to as carpet algae.
not to mention the fish love such snacks!
 

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