Dragonfly larvae...are they a likely problem?


Joshaeus

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Hello all! Indoors I have a group of licorice gouramies, and this summer I would like to try to breed them in a 20 gallon pot pond on the north side of my house. I'm nervous about mosquito larvae, though...the licorice gouramies are only an inch long, and I'm wondering if they would be eaten by the dragonfly larvae. Is this a valid concern? How can I prevent it? Thankx in advance! (PS...this is not the usual pond - licorice gouramies are blackwater fish, so their water is going to be tea-colored and with a PH in the 4's. Needless to say, the cosmetic value is going to be mostly derived from the plants growing in or out of the pond...any suggestions for vining or other plants that do well growing out of a pond? I already know from their aquarium that water lettuce grows like a weed under these conditions)
 
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Joshaeus

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More dragonfly larvae...the licorice gouramies will eat the mosquito larvae (which is exactly why I'm putting them outside).
 
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Large dragonfly larvae would make short work of the licorice gouramies, you may want to go out after dark with a flashlight and scissors and snip as many largish larvae before they get large.... The gouramies can get a nutritious snack out of those culls
 
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Mmathis

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Large dragonfly larvae would make short work of the licorice gouramies, you may want to go out after dark with a flashlight and scissors and snip as many largish larvae before they get large.... The gouramies can get a nutritious snack out of those culls
Explain..... Are they on the surface?
 
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may be cover it with net so the dragonfly cant lay eggs? or have fine net submerged cage for the fry ...the larvae can eat fry
 

Joshaeus

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Another question...how big do fish need to be before dragonfly larvae cease to be a problem?
 

Troutredds

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I would leave your gouramies inside, to breed under more precisely controlled, safe conditions. The focus of your concern, the nymphal dragonfly, has 250 million years of evolution on it's side. They can alleviate your mosquito breeding issues and, in turn, benefit from your container habitat. I have an aquatic entomology background, and find the enduring history of dragonflies, and their close relatives damselflies, a constant source of child-like amazement. The real "problem" I see is global habitat loss and the resulting erosion of biodiversity. Regardless of my views, I wish you best of luck with your container pond, Josheaus.
 
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Joshaeus

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OK! Thank you. Probably going to shoot for something larger and more traditional for this pot...paradise fish :) No need to worry about THEM being eaten (3-4 inches before the tail).
 
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Meyer Jordan

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I would leave your gouramies inside, to breed under more precisely controlled, safe conditions. The focus of your concern, the nymphal dragonfly, has 250 million years of evolution on it's side. They can alleviate your mosquito breeding issues and, in turn, benefit from your container habitat. I have an aquatic entomology background, and find the enduring history of dragonflies, and their close relatives damselflies, a constant source of child-like amazement. The real "problem" I see is global habitat loss and the resulting erosion of biodiversity. Regardless of my views, I wish you best of luck with your container pond, Josheaus.
Are you a member of any Odonata groups?
 

Joshaeus

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Guess the paradise fish should be plenty safe then :)
 
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Troutredds

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Are you a member of any Odonata groups?
I am through University of Puget Sound, but not officially. I follow the World Odonata List, an ongoing compilation of all genera and species. Are there any links you suggest? I'm not a big fan of Facebook.
 

Meyer Jordan

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I am through University of Puget Sound, but not officially. I follow the World Odonata List, an ongoing compilation of all genera and species. Are there any links you suggest? I'm not a big fan of Facebook.
I am a long time lurker and member (in name only) of SE-Odonata on Yahoo. Primarily Odonata of the Southeastern U.S. I would think that there would be a similar group for the Northwestern U.S.

UPDATE: Just checked. There is a group on Yahoo....NW- Odonata. Presently has 108 members.
 
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Skimmer Dragonfly Nymph eats a Feeder Fish for the first time - YouTube
 

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