Filter Issues.


mrsclem

mrsclem
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2 types of filters- mechanical and biological. Mechanical filters remove debris from the water, biological filters have media that contain bacteria that break down the bad stuff in pond water. You don't want to put a biological filter before the bog. Hope this helps.
 
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brokensword

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your plants won't starve if you prefilter; I did that for a couple of years. Whatever your mechanical filter traps, water still will be carrying enough nutrients to the plants. When the water hits the bog, the bacteria there convert the ammonia to nitrites. THEN another bacteria in the bog converts THAT to nitrate, so you see, you're still going to feed your plants. So prefilter away; you're good.
 
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A pre-filter to a bog should only be to keep heavy solids out like plants and leaves. I would do any foam mesh or micron filters.
 
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My current set up has an all in one pump and filter with sponges to trap solids and small thick walled ceramic rings to provide a home for beneficial bacteria. As the nitrates build up very quickly I'm pretty certain that diverting the filtered water will provide plenty of nourishment for the bog plants.
 
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I suggest you read through this forum extensively to educate yourself on the nitrogen cycle, beneficial bacteria, how to properly clean a filter without killing off that beneficial bacteria, the need for plants in that cycle and much more.

You will read that a lot of us don't use store bought filters, instead we use a bog filter. The water gets pumped under 12 inches of pea gravel, rises up through the gravel and returns to the pond. Plants, which thrive on the excess nutrients, are grown directly in the gravel. The bog filter can be small or large. In your case it won't need to be very big since your pond is only 100 gallons. A wooden box with a liner or a long window planter would probably work for you. You won't be wasting money on an inadequate store bought filter and the bog will keep your water crystal clear with no maintenance. No cleaning of any filter pads at all.
Hi Poconojoe, I'm getting everything I need to build my bog filter but just want to clarify one thing. The pond water will be entering the bog filter through the pipes that sit under the gravel. Am I right in thinking that the water leaves the bog filter by say running over a sill or through a pipe both of which would be at the TOP of the bog filter box? Many thanks, Brian M
 
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