Fish keep dying, not sure why


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Shade fabric over the pond of some sort. Even a beach umbrella. Are any of the plants in the pond potted with some kind of soil? Most everybody uses plain cat litter.
They are floaty plants, no potting.
 
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I have the same size preformed pond with a Tetrapond UV bio filter 1500 with a Pond Master 2000 prefilter and Lifeguard All in one filter. My water would run high on nitrates all the time and I had to do frequent water changes. Also had hair algae growing in my stream. About a month after changing 1/2 of the water and filter/bio rinse, the nitrate would run high again and the koi’s were sluggish and would not eat and stay at the bottom of the pond and If I didn’t catch this, I would lose a few of them.

Frustrated I changed the bio balls inside my Tetra Bio filter. Low and behold, the water nitrates is now good and the hair algae that grew in my stream and on the edge of my water fall that feeds to my pond went away.

Never heard or knew of bio balls becoming toxic or contaminated. Anyone else experience this?
I'm going to recommend you post this as a new thread so you can get some answers that relate to your issue.

Welcome to the GPF!
 
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Oh man I hope that's all that it is! Like I said she plans on draining today so that would fix that issue.
I am 100% convinced this is the issue - like I said, the speed at which the fish are dying points to some kind of toxic condition in the water. A small pond in particular would be very easy to overdose. Tell your friend to trash the algaecide. If it kills fish, imagine what it does to all the microscopic life in the pond. You'll never get a balanced pond without all those tiny critters populating the pond.
 
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I am 100% convinced this is the issue - like I said, the speed at which the fish are dying points to some kind of toxic condition in the water. A small pond in particular would be very easy to overdose. Tell your friend to trash the algaecide. If it kills fish, imagine what it does to all the microscopic life in the pond. You'll never get a balanced pond without all those tiny critters populating the pond.
Oh I will! I so hope this is it and it makes sense. I've been trying to help her get the pond balanced by adding plants and a filter so she can get that good bacteria. She has been unhappy with how green the water is and I know from experience that more plants and more filtration/bacteria will fix that but I didn't even think about the algaecide staying in the water!
 
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I am 100% convinced this is the issue - like I said, the speed at which the fish are dying points to some kind of toxic condition in the water. A small pond in particular would be very easy to overdose. Tell your friend to trash the algaecide. If it kills fish, imagine what it does to all the microscopic life in the pond. You'll never get a balanced pond without all those tiny critters populating the pond.
I agree, fish don’t like algaecide at all. Use with caution.
 
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Small ponds can be more difficult to manage than big ones - small changes can have big impact. Encourage her to allow the pond time to balance on it's own, keep the fish load low, feed lightly, lots of plants, and she will soon have a pond she can enjoy! There are just no quick fixes in the pond world!
 
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Don't add any chemicals...ever!
The pond will naturally balance itself over time. It's good she has plants. The more, the better.
The only thing I use is a dechlorinator for when I add my city water. And when I do that, I use a small hose attachment that measures how much water I'm adding.
Also, the smaller the pond, the quicker things can go wrong because there's so little water. Basically, it's easier to keep a bigger pond than a smaller one.
Changing the water and rinsing it out is a good start. Run the filter and add lots of plants. Wait a couple weeks, then add a couple feeder goldfish. If they do well, add a few more after a week.
A liquid test kit is also good to have. Maybe the Ph is way off?
 

j.w

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@PondMomma I hope this time after getting rid of all that old water w/the algeacide in it that your friend will wait awhile to get more fish. Let the water cycle some and then add a couple fish. Algae comes and goes and fish don't mind it, just us.
 
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Do you all have a liquid test kit recommendation? I have always used strips but I know they can be faulty and I'm almost out anyways. I know pH, ammonia, nitrates are the major ones to watch for but anything else?
 
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most chemicals (including algaecides) are toxic to fish but the dilution of the chemical in the water saves them. When overuse of chemicals builds up in the water that toxicity can kill fish quickly. chemical toxins are not usually picked up in standard water tests. pesticides and algaecides can be really harmful to fish in small amounts. Usually toxins are about the only way a fish will die so quickly in water. Sad but sounds like you now have the solution. let a know how it all turns out. Remember to make sure the new water is matured well before new fish are added.
 
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Yes, it's sad. So many people come here with very similar problems. Some "expert" told them to add this or that all because the water is not crystal clear. As they learn more about this hobby, they find out that clear water is for us humans. The fish don't really care. Go to any lake or pond. Are they crystal clear? Do the fish live healthy normal lives?
If your pond is setup properly, time will work things out. As long as it's all balanced properly. Having too many fish, over feeding, not enough filtration, not enough plants...etc. will throw things off and cause one symptom or another.
You can achieve clear water as many here have done. But everything has to be well balanced.
Those who have bog filters seem to be the majority that have clear water.
I don't have a bog filter, but hope to add one some day.
My water is clear for the top 18" or so. But a little cloudy toward the 3 foot depth. I can make out the bottom on some days. In one respect I like it that way as to better hide the fish from predators.
 

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