Flowering Perennials for shade?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by ShawnInfirmity, Jun 12, 2018.

  1. ShawnInfirmity

    ShawnInfirmity

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    So, my backyard gets a lot of shade.. it gets maybe 2-3 hours of afternoon/evening sunlight so I guess that would be mostly shade if not technically "full shade"? We recently moved some Hostas to the back from the side of the house (in front of the fence) because they were getting too much sun and we're waiting to see how many of them recover and start growing. We also have some Lantana on the side of the house (but behind the fence in the back yard) so they get a decent amount of sun (just not as much as the plants in front of the fence) and seem to be doing okay so far, but I doubt it would do well in the far back. I think I'm going to try some Turk's Cap if I can find some, but was wondering if anyone else had some suggestions on plants that they've successfully used in the shade? Thanks in advance and I have added pictures below that might help clear up any confusion. @Lisak1 or @JBtheExplorer or any other avid gardeners that might have some sage wisdom..

    B1A5A60D-049B-42A8-873F-6F724E1DA74A.jpeg D4A97D53-970F-4E4B-8BC7-F8915CEFA420.jpeg 33FC5B5D-2D6C-4512-AC8B-BF9F4B604666.jpeg

    This is the side of the house behind the fence where the Lantana is doing pretty well, BUT the Coneflowers withered up rather quickly, not enough sun OR too much water from recent storms??

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    This is the spot where my wife tried to have a small garden which didn't do well at all, most likely because it doesn't get enough sun... So we pulled up all the stuff that wasn't growing well and moved some of the Hostas here and added some Aztec grass.

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    This is one of the corners where it gets A LOT of shade and we were hoping to add something that flowers/blooms like Turk's Cap or some other Perennial?? The Liriope was a gift from wife's grandmother and is most likely going to be divided up and moved around as needed.

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    The Hostas were moved from the side of the house in front of the fence where it now gets A LOT of sun ever since the tree trimmers cut my tree back from the houses and turned it into a weird mohawk tree.

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    This is the very back of the yard where we moved most of the Hostas to see which ones recover from being scorched by the hot sun and we will move them around as needed to add some other plants and give the area more interest and variety.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2018
    ShawnInfirmity, Jun 12, 2018
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  2. ShawnInfirmity

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    I am currently experimenting with astilbe — it’s a perennial, sort of fern-looking plant (but not a fern). I planted them last year and this year they produced flowers for the first time. So far mine are still kinda leggy, but otherwise are growing well. They like a lot of moisture and SHADE! I think the flowers come in whites, pinks, reds, lavenders, purples. If I recall, hostas are a good companion plant for them.

    This is not my picture, but is a Google image. Mine aren’t anywhere close to looking like this yet.

    0CC95977-3D94-4966-A62C-7610CCDECF81.jpeg
     
    Mmathis, Jun 12, 2018
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  3. ShawnInfirmity

    ShawnInfirmity

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    Thanks @Mmathis I'll have to show this to the boss (wife) and see what she says. It seems like most of my suggestions based on research I've done about "shade tolerant Perennials for North Texas", etc. seem to fall short for one reason or another. She's not a fan of the leggy or twiggy plants for the most part which is why I was a little surprised she seemed on board when it came to the Turk's Cap.
     
    ShawnInfirmity, Jun 12, 2018
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  4. ShawnInfirmity

    mrsclem mrsclem

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    The astilbe comes in several colors. Also, bleeding hearts and lily of the valley. I know you are looking for blooms but consider japanese painted fern. Very colorful and multiplies well. japanese%20painted%20fern_jpg_rendition_largest_ss.jpg
     
    mrsclem, Jun 12, 2018
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    j.w I Love my Goldies

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    Heuchera does well in shade and my preference so far is the shiny dark maroon leaved ones as their stems that you have to cut off each Winter are not as tall and gangling as some other colors. This plant does well in shade and can take some sun also.

    [​IMG]
     
    j.w, Jun 12, 2018
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  6. ShawnInfirmity

    JBtheExplorer Native Gardener

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    I don't grow a ton of full-shade flowering plants. I mostly grow various ferns. The plants I do grow are not native to your area, so they may not grow well, or may not be appropriate options.

    I'm a big fan of Wild Geranium. It grows in sun or shade.
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    I really like Wild Ginger. While it technically gets flowers, they're small and lay on the ground. You won't notice them. This plant is grown for the nice foliage. It's a ground cover, but seems to spread very slowly, at least for me.
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    Columbine species are always good choices. I grow Eastern Red Columbine. It's another plant that can grow in shade or sun.
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    JBtheExplorer, Jun 12, 2018
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  7. ShawnInfirmity

    Lisak1

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    You've gotten some good suggestions already, but I'll add one thing - shade perennials that flower won't give you season long color, generally speaking. My husband always wants to plant things that flower all season long - those are called "annuals" dear!

    That's why I love to go for foliage for interest. Different types of hostas - from the very darkest greens to the light, almost yellows to the big blues - as well as those that are streaked with white or yellow will all add lots of color to a shady spot. @Mmathis named one of my favs for shade - astilbe are beautiful with their feathery flowers and ferny structure. And of course ferns themselves come in many different shades and sizes. And heuchera - everything from deep, deep maroon to light green... so pretty!

    I think the very prettiest shade gardens are mainly shades of green and white - very cool and refreshing.
     
    Lisak1, Jun 13, 2018
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  8. ShawnInfirmity

    ShawnInfirmity

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    Thanks everyone for the recommendations! I think we have a good list of potential candidates going including: Astilbe, Cardinal Flower, Obedient Plant, and Turk's Cap. We already have quite a few Hostas that we are hoping will bounce back after being beat down by the sun so now we're just going to keep researching plant options and try to find sources to purchase them locally. I'm a big fan of the Columbine species as well, but the boss thinks they are too twiggy.
     
    ShawnInfirmity, Jun 13, 2018
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    Lisak1

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    That's so funny! She'll find over time that you can intermingle those "twiggy" plants with bushier ones to get a good mix of high and low in your gardenscape!
     
    Lisak1, Jun 13, 2018
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    Gemma

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    There are several Begonias that do well in shade, also not a flowering plant but some Caladium are very colorful
    [​IMG][​IMG]

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    Gemma, Jun 13, 2018
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  11. ShawnInfirmity

    Lisak1

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    Both are beautiful @Gemma ! I didn't mention either because he said he was looking for flowering perennials - although in his zone, these may well be perennials!
     
    Lisak1, Jun 13, 2018
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  12. ShawnInfirmity

    ShawnInfirmity

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    That's what I was thinking. Maybe I can sneak some seeds (or whatever they grow from?) in there and when they grow up behind another plant she'll be pleasantly surprised!? :LOL:
     
    ShawnInfirmity, Jun 13, 2018
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  13. ShawnInfirmity

    Panzer13

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    I have recently started growing Helloborus. Their foliage looks like a fern and they bloom during the winter. They are very hardy but do not like allot of sun or heat. I love them as they add color to an otherwise dreary winter garden their foliage is a very nice emerald green and the blooms stay on the plant all year round, but only have color in the winter.
    img_0748.jpg th.jpg dscn2787.jpg
     
    Panzer13, Jun 13, 2018
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    qclabrat

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    Astilbes are great, most deer resistant very drought tolerant. He have at least 30-40 plants and divided them every few years.
     
    qclabrat, Jun 13, 2018
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    qclabrat

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    I love caladiums and planted them for year along with cannas, but in my climate they never come back. I tried one year digging them up, But the following year not many took.
     
    qclabrat, Jun 13, 2018
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    qclabrat

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    others I've had luck in NJ in the shade, but maybe not in TX
    Spring: creeping phlox, bleeding heart, peony
    Summer: stella doro lilies, coreoposis, butterfly bush
    Fall: mums, asters
     
    qclabrat, Jun 13, 2018
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    Gemma

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    Same happened to me, but I like'em too much to give up on them!
    Hubby got me a bag of 30 count mixed colors from Costco, for the price I'd pay for a couple of annuals so I'm going to keep trying to winterize them and if I can't, I will enjoy them as annuals
    Cannas are a different story, I have a total addiction, I winterize several kinds and give away hundreds every Spring. I also start some from seed to see if I can come up with a different specimen..like I said, I'm totally addicted! :)
     
    Gemma, Jun 13, 2018
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    JamieB

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    Violets. Wild ones I have in my yard love the shade. I’m not home to get pics, but we typically get two blooms, spring and fall when things are cooler and moist.
     
    JamieB, Jun 13, 2018
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  19. ShawnInfirmity

    ShawnInfirmity

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    Wow, thanks for all the amazing suggestions! I was thinking I would get a few responses, but you all have outdone yourselves. I think I've added some more possibilities to the list based on what I've researched and from suggestions you all provided here including: Hellebores (lenten rose), Bellflower, Violet Rubellia, and/or Geraniums. I'm just worried that some of them might be a little delicate since we can get some pretty strong storms/rain at times.
     
    ShawnInfirmity, Jun 13, 2018
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  20. ShawnInfirmity

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    Well, we are the GARDEN Pond Forum!
     
    Mmathis, Jun 13, 2018
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