Green pea diet for swim bladder problem....

Mmathis

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How long do you treat them and do you give them anything else to eat during the "treatment", or just peas?

I have one poor little Ryunkin that occas. has problems and I usually end up bringing her in the house for a few days. When I try feeding her in the pond, the other fish grab the peas before she can get them, since she is somewhat uncoordinated -- she's the only fish that currently has a name and it's "Spaz." I brought her in yesterday, and after 3 meals she seems fine, but wondering if she would benefit by staying inside a little longer.
 
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I would think it best to keep her in the house longer if you can. Feed peas, oranges, frozen blood worms, fresh shrimp chopped up, gel food, anything that is easy to digest. Try to stay away from dry foods.
 
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Spaz is one of those fish Meyer who from time to time needs that laxarive effect on its body , I concur wit Maria the longer you can keep spaz in the home for the time being the better for spaz .
You could try addinf a little chopped and purged worms for fiuture reference

Dave
 

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Spaz is one of those fish Meyer who from time to time needs that laxarive effect on its body , I concur wit Maria the longer you can keep spaz in the home for the time being the better for spaz .
You could try addinf a little chopped and purged worms for fiuture reference

Dave
Wasn't questioning the procedure, just making an observation about Green Peas and Koi. I have talked to many pondkeepers that did not realize that Green Peas had this effect.
 
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Mmathis

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Spaz is one of those fish Meyer who from time to time needs that laxarive effect on its body , I concur wit Maria the longer you can keep spaz in the home for the time being the better for spaz .
You could try addinf a little chopped and purged worms for fiuture reference

Dave
Spaz is pleased that you remember her, Dave!

Got some fresh worms today. But tell me, how do you purge a worm? If I recall with crawfish, you put them in salted water. But wouldn't the stuff in the worm's gut be healthy for the fish, so why purge it?
 
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Spaz is pleased that you remember her, Dave!

Got some fresh worms today. But tell me, how do you purge a worm? If I recall with crawfish, you put them in salted water. But wouldn't the stuff in the worm's gut be healthy for the fish, so why purge it?
To purge a worm Maggie place one or two worms iin a tin with grass in it give them about twelve hours or so and they should have purged their bodies sifficiant for the goldfish to eat thus helping with the bodies laxative effect by the worm and peas

Dave
 
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Poor worm - goes on that cleansing diet and ends up in the belly of a fish. A lot of effort to become someone's meal!

I will confess - I dig worms straight from my garden and toss them in the pond. The fish go nuts for them. Red wigglers, earthworms - all gone in a flash. Exactly what are you purging from the worms?
 

Mmathis

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Poor worm - goes on that cleansing diet and ends up in the belly of a fish. A lot of effort to become someone's meal!

I will confess - I dig worms straight from my garden and toss them in the pond. The fish go nuts for them. Red wigglers, earthworms - all gone in a flash. Exactly what are you purging from the worms?
@Lisak1 You're purging the contents of their GI tract -- like a laxative for the worm.

But @Dave 54, why is it necessary to purge the worm prior to feeding it to the fish? Does it make a difference in how it works on the fish [in the long run]?

Also, @Dave 54 is it necessary to chop the worm up? Or would that depend on the size of the fish you're feeding it to and the size of its mouth? I have problems with chopping up a living creature -- I cringe every time I accidently chop a worm when I dig.
 

Mmathis

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OK, so here's the research I've done.....

PURGING: You "may" only need to do this if your worms came from your garden. Store-bought [ie, bait worms, which is what I have] "may" be OK to feed w/out purging. The concern is that worms can pick up parasites and possibly unhealthy bacteria from garden soil that could be passed on to the fish, though most of what I read was dealing with worms for human consumption. Otherwise, what is in the worm's gut is nutritious for the fish [all kinds of trace elements and stuff that they wouldn't get from regular food].

CHOPPING: Depends on how big the worms are and how big the fish are. Naturally, a larger goldie has a larger mouth so might be able to suck in a whole worm. I just tried it and obviously had the wrong kind of knife, 'cause it tore more than cut the worm up [poor thing!]. One source says using scissors might work better so that's what I'll try next time.

SERVING: Not sure about the best way to serve them to the fish. Some say they just throw the worms [pieces] in the water and the fish gobble them up. But since mine have never had this particular meal before, I think I'll take it slow and introduce them gradually -- I don't want a bunch of rotting worm bits on the bottom of the pond! One source said to introduce them on the end of a toothpick just to get the fish used to them.

Boy, the things we do for our pets!:nailbiting:
 
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Basically Maggie you have answered all your own questionns here and have done things exactly as we would do things in readying the worms for the pond or specific goldfish.
It's not boy the things we do for our pets really Maggie no its more like what can we do for them, they eat better than us !!!!......:)
.

Dave
 

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Keep in mind, Maggie, that the problem with your ryukin is more likely a problem with its breed than a gastro-intestinal issue. When fish are bred for abnormalities such as an egg-shaped body, the internal organs are forced into strange positions, and this is the root of the problem. It's not so much that your fish has 'occasional problems', its more like (s)he is deformed. Feeding it peas may or may not help, but NOTHING can cure the condition.
John
 

Mmathis

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@HARO John, yeah, I know. Had I done my research ahead of time I wouldn't have gotten a Ryukin as a pond fish in the first place, but I was anxious for some flash & color in my pond. Despite her affliction, she does very well and keeps up with the big boys -- except for those occassional times when she requires a little extra TLC.
 
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Just out of curiosity how do you know if your fish needs the green pea diet. Obviously Im a pond rookie and just trying to gain some knowledge
 
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