Had a cool looking plant in the yard...but

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by RobAmy, Oct 5, 2017.

  1. RobAmy

    RobAmy

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    I had this cool looking plant/weed growing up under the bird feeder and had no idea what it was. Well glad I looked it up. Very bad plant for pets and humans (can be deadly). I am sure a few of you already know about it. I did not, it is called Jimson weed and various other names. It is no longer in the yard. Not worried about the human part to much but not worth the risk with the pets. Here are a few pics for identification. If you do not know what it is, look it up you will be surprised, I was.

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    RobAmy, Oct 5, 2017
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  2. RobAmy

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

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    Thanks I have not seen that here. Will watch out for it.
     
    addy1, Oct 5, 2017
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  3. RobAmy

    Gemma

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    me too!
     
    Gemma, Oct 6, 2017
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  4. RobAmy

    j.w I Love my Goldies

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    Never seen it here either but thanks for the warning!
    I looked it up and it seems it has some interesting stories about it.

    Legends, Myths and Stories
    Jimsonweed has an interesting history; it was/is used in witchcraft or wicca.

    It has been used for hallucinogenic and medicinal purposes since ancient times. The Greek priests of Apollo used it to produce prophecies. In 38 BC Antony’s soldiers ate some of the plant while retreating and became ridiculously incoherent. The plant’s name is derived from a similar incident involving soldiers in Jamestown in 1676. They too ate the plant and were good for little but clowning for eleven days. As a result, the plant came to be called Jamestown weed, which evolved into jimson weed.

    Its use was supposedly introduced to medieval Europe by gypsies who brought it from India. The gypsies smoked it to experience hallucinations. Because it also gives the sensation of flying and releases inhibitions, especially in women, jimson weed was associated in the Middle Ages with witchcraft, Witches inhaled its vapors while casting spells.

    Jimson weed has been taken for its narcotic and hallucinogenic effects by Native American tribes from the southwestern United States to South America. Many tribes used it to induce visions in priests, medicine men, and puberty rites. The Zuni and many California Indian tribes set broken bones after administering jimson weed as an anesthetic. The Mariposa Indians gave it to its women as an aphrodisiac.

    The name stinkweed refers to the narcotic odor which is unpleasant.

    The plant is gathered in the fall and slowly dried in the shade.
     
    j.w, Oct 6, 2017
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  5. RobAmy

    Stephen T.

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    I've never seen jimson weed either, but your title made me jump! I also discovered a plant, just a couple days ago when I was cleaning out the dying plants in my bog. I have no idea what it is, but it's attractive. It must be shade tolerant, as it was totally hidden under a thick growing something else. Overall it's about 2' wide and low growing.
    what plant_7551.jpg
     
    Stephen T., Oct 6, 2017
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    qclabrat

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    found one in my perennial garden 2 years ago and thought it was very interesting as well. Like you identified it correctly and put it in a big trash bag. Glad you disposed of it before the seed pods matured. My guess is that mine came from some mulch I had delivered in the spring. I hear the seeds stay active for a few decades :eek:

    read this PA when investigating the plant, kids will try anything....
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9274142
     
    qclabrat, Oct 6, 2017
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  7. RobAmy

    qclabrat

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    does it look like it will flower?
    you could always send the photo to a local college for identification. I've done that for bugs at Rutgers, they have a fairly well known agriculture department there and generally reply to my questions.
     
    qclabrat, Oct 6, 2017
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