Hello from Southern, NJ

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by uscstaylor, Jun 8, 2016.

  1. uscstaylor

    uscstaylor

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2016
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Galloway NJ
    Hey Gang
    I am a new small pond owner with 2 small koi in a 160 gallon little back yard pond. Im looking forward to asking you all a lot of questions and learning a lot from you guys.
    Cheers
     
    uscstaylor, Jun 8, 2016
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. uscstaylor

    ashirley Annie in SC

    Joined:
    May 7, 2011
    Messages:
    258
    Likes Received:
    141
    Location:
    South Carolina
    Welcome!
     
    ashirley, Jun 8, 2016
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. uscstaylor

    sissy sissy

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2011
    Messages:
    31,320
    Likes Received:
    14,351
    Location:
    Axton virginia
    Welcome and guessing you will need a bigger pond sooner than later .I made the mistake and got koi and they are over 2 feet long .Been all over NJ in my lifetime but don't think I ever visited Galloway ,at least not that i remember ;)
     
    sissy, Jun 8, 2016
    #3
  4. uscstaylor

    Graham Griggs

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2016
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    1
    I am with sissy - koi will outgrow 160 gallons quite quickly (well 3 - 4 years). Perhaps smaller breeds of fish - shubunkins?
     
    Graham Griggs, Jun 8, 2016
    #4
  5. uscstaylor

    Becky Administrator

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2011
    Messages:
    2,282
    Likes Received:
    1,494
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    Welcome aboard! (y)
     
    Becky, Jun 9, 2016
    #5
  6. uscstaylor

    uscstaylor

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2016
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Galloway NJ
    No problem there, I have a local fish store that will take them and trade them in for smaller ones when I need too. I enjoy the koi so I buy them small 3-4 inches. Only 2 in there, Who knows I'll probably build a 700-1000 gallon pond when they get bigger. Its not that hard to build a pond. I enjoyed it actually...Here's a couple of pics of the 160 gallon pond 7'X5'. The pics dont really do it justice..I still have to get the slate this week and put that in..I'm also making a Bakki shower for it was well. My fish will have a nice condo for them ...lol
    pics:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    uscstaylor, Jun 9, 2016
    #6
    Ardan Hernández and sissy like this.
  7. uscstaylor

    uscstaylor

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2016
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Galloway NJ
    Sissy if you go to Smithville, NJ that's Galloway...
     
    uscstaylor, Jun 9, 2016
    #7
  8. uscstaylor

    sissy sissy

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2011
    Messages:
    31,320
    Likes Received:
    14,351
    Location:
    Axton virginia
    I have friends in Brick ,Atlantic City and Little Egg Harbor and Parlin .I lived a long time in Edison NJ right by Ford Motor Company plant .My son lives in Woodbridge and tows for the turnpike and parkway
     
    sissy, Jun 9, 2016
    #8
  9. uscstaylor

    Graham Griggs

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2016
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    1
     
    Graham Griggs, Jun 9, 2016
    #9
  10. uscstaylor

    Tula

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2013
    Messages:
    3,950
    Likes Received:
    3,081
    Location:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Welcome to the forum :) You might consider some shade for your pond this summer, as smaller ponds heat up more quickly.
     
    Tula, Jun 9, 2016
    #10
    sissy likes this.
  11. uscstaylor

    Graham Griggs

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2016
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    1
    Great idea - 6 in koi are worth about 30 times 3 inch ones so you could run at a profit !! Make sure the kids don't give them names or they will never let them go.
    My only comments would be that you should plant something right next to the pond on the south side so that at least one third of the water is in the shade, surprisingly fish do get sunburn and die from it if there is nowhere for them to get out of the direct light. If that is not possible then put something plastic (not metal / stone / tile / concrete) in the water that they can hide beneath or inside, perhaps a plastic bucket on its side. Also for a new pond check that the water never gets to be alkaline, which it can from stones, slabs and other building materials, if it does get alkaline then don't use expensive "cures" just put in 4 pints of diet soda, the carbon dioxide will neutralise any excess alkali, keep doing it once a week. Alternatively put a half inch deep layer of compost on the bottom. Make sure it stays neutral or slightly acidic for at least three months before putting the first fish in. I see that you have fountain, that should run 24*7 to ensure that there is enough oxygen in the water. If you have no filter or UV then absolute maximum stocking should be half an inch of fish for each square foot of surface, and preferably lower than that.

    Good luck, I will watch with interest, you are about 6 months ahead of me in building my next pond.
     
    Graham Griggs, Jun 9, 2016
    #11
  12. uscstaylor

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    Messages:
    33,637
    Likes Received:
    18,461
    Location:
    Frederick, Maryland
    Welcome to our group!
     
    addy1, Jun 10, 2016
    #12
  13. uscstaylor

    Lisak1

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2013
    Messages:
    6,937
    Likes Received:
    7,793
    Location:
    Northern IL
    ??? That's a first. I won't put diet soda in my body, I sure don't want it in my pond! Do you have a source for that info?
     
    Lisak1, Jun 10, 2016
    #13
  14. uscstaylor

    Graham Griggs

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2016
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    1
    Hi

    I have had several ponds in the past, I have recently moved house so I am working out where to put a pond in this one. (also I have a degree in chemistry - but it is the experience that matters)

    New ponds are almost always alkaline because of the materials used to build them and fish cannot stand alkaline water, so my advice is to get a test kit and check regularly. I have lost fish in the past because I did not know that.

    As for the diet soda it contains a lot of carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide will react with any alkaline materials present and form harmless materials such as chalk. If the water is not alkaline then the gas will just bubble away. I agree with you that diet soda is c##p but it is the easiest, cheapest source of carbon dioxide, and it also usually has some citric acid in it which is also a good remedy for alkaline water. The good news is that diet soda is so mildly acidic than you can't "overdose" and make the water too acidic, which you can with some of the other remedies. If you can get a supply of carbon dioxide gas and bubble it through the water then that is much better. The reason for diet soda is that it contains no sugar, which you definitely do not want in your pond, or alternatively use soda water which is nothing but carbon dioxide and water. Compost also contains natural acids, but will make your water green and will take a while to settle down.

    The absolute key, however you do it is to get the ph of your pond below 7 (but not too much below), and keep it there for as long as you are prepared to wait before putting in fish. Anything over 7.5 will almost certainly kill the fish.
    .
     
    Graham Griggs, Jun 10, 2016
    #14
  15. uscstaylor

    Lisak1

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2013
    Messages:
    6,937
    Likes Received:
    7,793
    Location:
    Northern IL
    Our ph is above 8 and has been for five years (no exact number to offer as I stopped testing the pond on a regular basis after year one) and we have both koi and goldfish that are thriving. I think your information might need updating. Please don't take that the wrong way - I'm not trying to be critical or harsh. Just sharing what I know from my own experience.
     
    Lisak1, Jun 10, 2016
    #15
    sissy likes this.
  16. uscstaylor

    sissy sissy

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2011
    Messages:
    31,320
    Likes Received:
    14,351
    Location:
    Axton virginia
    mine stays between 8 and 9 and since the start been that way since 2004 .When it rains it can go up to 9 and stay there for days and then goes back to 8 .Never lost a fish yet gave a lot away .All are happy and healthy and really don't think ph is the biggest killer of fish .Ammonia and lack of oxygen and not enough filtering maybe but ph not so much unless maybe it hits rock bottom low
     
    sissy, Jun 10, 2016
    #16
  17. uscstaylor

    uscstaylor

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2016
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Galloway NJ
    Thanks for the comments guys to answer a few of them...Yes my wife already named them, Cha and Ching, get it Cha-Ching....lol. Once the pond completes cycle we will get two more small ones and name them Euro and Yen. Then as they get older and larger I will make them a much larger pond. I'm sure I'll have a least 2 summers before that happens. I also will be adding shade to the pond along with finishing the slate rock. There's a Filter/Fountain with UV built in it running 24/7 and I do have a nice hiding spot in there for them as well.
    I tested my water and so far the levels are fairly low and I'm keeping my eye on the Nitrites and Nitrates and Ammo. Making sure that they stay low...My PH will always fluctuate in the pond.
     
    uscstaylor, Jun 10, 2016
    #17
  18. uscstaylor

    Graham Griggs

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2016
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    1
     
    Graham Griggs, Jun 10, 2016
    #18
  19. uscstaylor

    Graham Griggs

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2016
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    1
    I am pleased for the info, as I am just building a new pond. Perhaps I don't need to be as fussy about the ph as I have been in the past., certainly no offense taken, it is to get the help of broad experience that I joined the forum.

    From your comments you are describing long established ponds where the residents are used to and happy in stable conditions. But for a new pond the fish will be coming from a stockist that will have had them at about 7.3 - 7 .5 and the big change will kill them.

    I have looked in my paper pond books and done a bit of googling and 6.9-7.5 is the recommended range of ph and it is "unusual" for fish to tolerate over 8 for any extended period of time unless they were bred in it, when they can "sometimes" live in up to 9.

    Most building materials are strongly alkaline (particularly cement and concrete) so that is which side the risk lies for newly constructed ponds.

    Heavily stocked ponds can also build up ammonia which is also very alkaline and can take the ph over 10, which will certainly kill the fish.

    I have never heard of, and can't find online, a case of pond fish dying because the water is too acidic, whereas there are loads from it being too alkaline, which was also my own experience where newly introduced fish died in about 8.0 - 8.2.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2016
    Graham Griggs, Jun 10, 2016
    #19
  20. uscstaylor

    sissy sissy

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2011
    Messages:
    31,320
    Likes Received:
    14,351
    Location:
    Axton virginia
    To stabilize ph you can go to a farm store and buy crushed oyster shells that they use to feed chickens to make there egg shells harder
     
    sissy, Jun 10, 2016
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.