HOW TO CHOOSE THE RIGHT AIR PUMP

Discussion in 'Pond Construction & Equipment' started by Mmathis, Jan 27, 2013.

  1. Mmathis

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    As usual, the choices are too numerous and confusing, and I want to be an informed consumer. So need some help: what are some factors to consider when choosing the best pump for pond aeration? What makes a pump good (or bad)? What "facts" are just sales pitches, and what information is sound?

    All I know at this point is that I want something that is quiet and energy efficient, can be used outdoors, low maintenance, and in the low-to-mid price range. My pond is approx. 3000 gal with a max depth of 4'; goldfish only (light to medium stock level); currently running a Skippy filter, but soon to be converting to a bog. Not having problems, but just want to add air.

    And another question: I'm confused when the ad is for a pond air pump, but the info says to "keep the pump indoors." Huh? Do they literally mean that, or do they mean to keep it in a covered and/or protected place? We don't really have anywhere close to the pond where we could house an air pump, so hoping they just mean like keep it under a fake rock, or something.....?
     
    Mmathis, Jan 27, 2013
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  2. Mmathis

    mrsclem mrsclem

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    When I use mine I keep it in an old styrofoam cooler with a hole cut for the cord and air line and a hole cut in the bottom for air flow. Haven't tried it in the winter but may start it up this week when the ponds thaw out. There may be some that have to be kept above freezing-
     
    mrsclem, Jan 27, 2013
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  3. Mmathis

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

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    Mine is just sitting outside, under a plastic tote. I did put some pipe insulation around the tubing coming out of it, the warm hot air could start to cause moisture which could freeze up. No issues.
     
    addy1, Jan 27, 2013
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  4. Mmathis

    mrsclem mrsclem

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    Good idea Addy. I just happen to have some of that that we never installed in the house SO.......
     
    mrsclem, Jan 27, 2013
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  5. Mmathis

    taherrmann4 Tmann

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    I think mine is a pond master, I am on my second one in 9 years and have been satisfied. I leave mine in my pumphouse, it is the size of a dog house, never had any problems.
     
    taherrmann4, Jan 27, 2013
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  6. Mmathis

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

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    mine is a pondmaster ap100, works great and very quiet, on its third year
     
    addy1, Jan 27, 2013
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  7. Mmathis

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    The PondMaster pumps were some I was looking at. How do you know what size you need?

    I notice in some reviews (all pumps, not just the PM), they talk about using a manifold to split & distribute the air. Assuming that the process of "splitting" air is similar to that of "splitting" off water from a pump, how do you calculate pump size based on how many diffusers [or whatever] you'll be using? And does the length [distance?] of tubing matter?

    I like the idea of the styrofoam container. Guessing I could have fun disguising one :)

    Also, noticing that most of the pumps only have a 6' electric cord. That doesn't seem very long for outdoor use -- fine if you're using it indoors, parked next to an aquarium. How far away from the pond do you have your air supply?
     
    Mmathis, Jan 27, 2013
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  8. Mmathis

    sissy sissy

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    Remember when you buy one always order an extra bladder as it is better to have it on hand .I bought 2 with the one I bought since it has a split system
     
    sissy, Jan 27, 2013
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  9. Mmathis

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    Do all pumps have bladders? Is this same as a diaphragm? Good advice, though.
     
    Mmathis, Jan 27, 2013
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  10. Mmathis

    sissy sissy

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    yep same thing really they produce the air .They are just like a balloon blow up and when you let go air comes back out .They dry out and crack over time from heat and cold .Best thing I could think of to explain how they work .There are lots of you tube video's on how they work
     
    sissy, Jan 27, 2013
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  11. Mmathis

    taherrmann4 Tmann

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    taherrmann4, Jan 27, 2013
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  12. Mmathis

    sissy sissy

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    you really have to look at cfm and depth they will push air and even cost to operate .I went to Graham NC because I really wanted to see in person how it works and what size to get and it had a 2 year warranty .There are so many things to consider like parts to fix it and how easy they are to get and how easy they are to replace and the parts .I tried mine out but decided to wait until spring to really get it going .I want to put a hose in each filter and one in each end of the pond .The pond master is great and have seen them working but the cost was kind of high for me and since I got one just before this one that did not live up to what it was said to be ,oh well could not talk hubby into putting out more money .I try to keep my budget for my pond down and wanted the bigger filter tanks so something had to be cut .
     
    sissy, Jan 28, 2013
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  13. Mmathis

    j.w I Love my Goldies

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    I have a Pondmaster AP40 and it works great like a volcano in my 2500 gal pond 3&1/2 ft deep. I need to still get some air stones to tone it down in Summer a bit. I don't use it in winter as think it would disrupt the water too much.

    IMG_4062 (Large).JPG
     
    j.w, Jan 28, 2013
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  14. Mmathis

    Rivermist

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    I like the dog house idea for the pump... mine was outside in a box but still stopped when temps dropped. I brought it inside with a system of air pipes from the basement, but... they broke... i guess I'll try to protect the pump better and put it back outside
     
    Rivermist, Jan 31, 2013
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  15. Mmathis

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    Wow, JW, that's a lot of air, there!! Seems like that would churn my entire pond surface. :)

    Kind of thinking (and wondering) of running air stones underneath the false-bottom of the turtle pond section. The area on top is my turtle-bogs, which is gravel & plants, supported by PVC pipe with a floor made of vinyl trellis & plastic craft mesh. So, basically, there is flow-through for water & air. Reason for wanting to add air there is that it's probably a "dead zone" up underneath (despite the water flow from the "bog") and the fish like to go there to hide. I have a slope built into the pond floor under the false-bottom to keep crud from collecting on the bottom.

    Just curious. No idea how it would work. Would the air percolate up through the "bog" above, and would that help the overall water quality via the mini-bogs? Would adding air in an "enclosed" spot just cause a bunch of bubbles to collect on the underside of the "false floor"? And would that be a good thing??
     
    Mmathis, Jan 31, 2013
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  16. Mmathis

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    BTW, how do you know which ones are energy efficient? What do you look for?
     
    Mmathis, Jan 31, 2013
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  17. Mmathis

    koiguy1969 GIGGETY-GIGGETY!!

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    just a little info on skimmers and aeration....
    The pond skimmer does more than clear the surface of the pond. Pond skimmers increase oxygen levels in ponds helping to further purify the water, and of course provide rich oxygen for your koi and pond fish. Pond skimmers can do as much or more than any sort of submerged aerator, and they do not disturb the surface of the pond, allowing for nice visibility and reflections to be enjoyed from the surface of your pond.
    Did you know that most oxygenation for ponds take place by way of the ponds surface area absorbing oxygen directly from the atmosphere. Those air pumps we use that create thousands of little bubbles that rush to the surface of the pond and explode really do very little to oxygenate. For oxygenation to occur those bubble need to have contact time with the pond water so they can give off the oxygen but they move so fast that there is really minor oxygenation that takes place. It is where the bubbles break up the surface of the water that the oxygenation takes place. Well a pond skimmer is constantly and rapidly breaking up the surface of the pond too. Pond skimmers oxygenate at a much greater pace, with more oxygen being absorbed into the water because the skimmer is constantly increasing the ponds surface area.
    a cut and paste from an article by Mike Gannon.
     
    koiguy1969, Jan 31, 2013
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