How to lower PH

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I just got a new test kit. and it showed the PH to be pretty high. (pretty doggone high, as in top of the chart 9)
I have no idea how long it's been that way, probably since the ponds inception.
Anyway, I need to slowly increase the acidity some. Rather that spend a small fortune on "super duper ph fixer",
and wait on shipping, how can I raise the acid content of the water?
Of course, before I get too crazy, I'll test again in a few days, we just had about 1 1/2" of rain today.
All other parameters tested for are; Nitrite-0, Ammonia-0, Phosphate-<.25ppm, but more than 0. This particular kit doesn't test for Nitrate, hardness, or KH.
As I write this, I started thinking about it. Pond is clear, one of the lilies has a bud on it, and it's just about to open.
There's a bit of floating algae clumps once in a while, which I just scoop out with the net. The fish are swimming 'round, and eating well. Only sign of anything amiss, is the lettuce is getting a bit brown around the edges. (which may be a sign of ongoing alkalinity) But the hiacynth (sp?) seems to be doing ok, (for now).
My pond could well have been alkaline since day one, and previous test (strips) never showed it.
I guess I'll need to test in the morning for PH, and see what it reads. Mabe even test am and pm for a few days, and average the readings? Before jumping to conclusions.
 
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You talked yourself right into the correct decision! Test again, look for a trend. pH will fluctuate from AM to PM. And remember - high pH is better than unstable pH. Sometimes the worst thing you can do is to chase those numbers. Let your pond settle the matter for itself. We had off the chart pH in the beginning, too. Left it alone and over time it resolved itself.
 
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I agree with @Lisak1 that a stable pH is better than trying to drastically change it altogether. There are a lot of variables when it comes to pH and when it's high it could be that there is more Co2 and/or Nitrogen (waste products) being consumed than produced which would cause alkalinity. If you have a relatively low fish load and A LOT of plants that could cause it. If you have an appropriate fish load but haven't been feeding as much due to colder weather that could also cause a high pH, etc. A LOT of variables, but the system usually balances itself out with time and reaches a state we call "homeostasis" in the human anatomy and physiology world.
 
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The best way to control PH swings is to monitor and control your KH and GH.
It's as simple as that.
PH value should be an afterthought.
 
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I would certainly get a record of tests going before trying to change anything. Test morning, noon and night for at least a week so you can see the trends. Also make sure your test kit is working properly, try testing some bottled water for example (it should be acidic) and your tap water. I just recently got a LOT of rain and my pH went up to 8.7 from it's normal super stable 8.2 (it like never changes, ever). Most importantly, if your plants and fish seem happy I don't see any reason to change anything at all. Stable is always best. Personally I have some plant issues and I think I could be getting better growth rates (both pond and aquarium fish) so I am considering some pH lowering technics like rainwater and peat.
 
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Morning test shows PH 6.9. evening is 9.0 so I guess I'll just watch it for now.
 
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6.9 in the morning and 9.0 at night? Not buying the result unless you have a 100 gallon pond. Could be a testing error. Ph doesnt move like that. Our pond is 8000 gallons with about 160 pounds of fish weight, and my readings just sit there steady day to day unless it rains and then they drop 0.6 pH due to acid rain. They never go up. PH stands for percentage of hydrogen—hydrogen ions relative to hydroxyl ions. And it’s an exponential value, so a move from 8 to 9 is ten times bigger than the move from 7 to 8. What can add hydroxyl ions without additional water? Can’t be a carbonate source. Calcium carbonate tops out at 8.3.

Test your source pH. We found that Charlotte water is supposed to be 7.2 at the tap, but in one area of the city, it’s 9+ so the ponds in that area stay high. Yours has to be a source issue, and there is no value in chasing that with chemicals.

And if your water has a pH move greater than about 0.6, you should have seen a fish behavioral reaction. They do not appreciate big pH moves.
 

sissy

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stabilize ph with crushed oyster shells like tractor supply sells for chickens
 
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