How to remove Chlorine and Chloramine


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I just filled my new pond and want to add some bait minnows to get the biological filter started. What is a good product to remove chlorine and chloramine or will they naturally dissipate from the waterfall?

Also, what is a good product to add to the bio-falls filter to get the biological bacteria established activated?

(pond is in Northern Virginia)

Thanks,
Tim
 

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Chlorine will dissipate on it's own. Any dechlor product will remove chloramines.

And the best way to get bacteria started is to let the pond do its thing. Some people use bacteria in a bottle (or a box) but bacteria will find you whether you do anything or not.
 

Mmathis

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Any product that is labeled for use in ponds.... Do a Google search — there are several. Others on here will chime in with their favorites, but I’m not sure that any one product is BETTER than another. I use the stuff they sell at Home Depot by Total Pond. If you do have chloramines in your water just be sure the product states that it removes that. As far as bacteria, I don’t use anything. I take it slow and let Mother Nature do the rest. But I would recommend a good water test kit so you can monitor your water quality while your pond is cycling. By monitoring the ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates, you can judge when it’s safe to add more fish.
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Oasis Pond Prime is my 'go to' as well for water conditioning. My well water has no chlorine/chloramine, but I have it on hand 'just in case' of ammonia. As far as beneficial bacteria goes... I am a bit of an outlier here on the forum, because I do use it on a regular basis (going with the might help/can't hurt philosophy) I like liquid Microbe-Lift for general purposes.
 
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Using Vitamin C to Neutralize Chlorine in Water Systems (fs.fed.us)

VITAMIN C DECHLORINATION

Vitamin C is a newer chemical method for neutralizing chlorine. Two forms of vitamin C, ascorbic acid and sodium ascorbate, will neutralize chlorine. Neither is considered a hazardous chemical. First, vitamin C does not lower the dissolved oxygen as much as sulfur-based chemicals do. Second, vitamin C is not toxic to aquatic life at the levels used for dechlorinating water. Although ascorbic acid is mildly acidic and, in large doses, will lower the pH of the treated water, sodium ascorbate is neutral and will not affect the pH of the treated water or the receiving stream. Both forms of vitamin C are stable, with a shelf life of at least 1 year in a dry form if kept in a cool, dark place. Once it is placed in solution, however, vitamin C degrades in a day or two.
 

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