Introduction

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by dahavishnu, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. dahavishnu

    dahavishnu

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    San Fernando Valley, CA
    I finally bit the bullet and am building a waterfall and pond in my back yard. It will be about 8' x 16',
    without the waterfall.
    I have been watching videos on youtube and have a couple friends who have recently put ponds
    in their yards. I joined this forum to get more ideas and information for my new pond and to keep up
    with what others are doing. I am planning on adding fish after completion sometime in spring or
    early summer. I had to take out an old orange tree (dying anyway) and re route my sprinklers.
    My immediate concern is my waterfall. I have to start from level ground and build it up with the dirt
    removed from the hole. Does anyone have any ideas on how I can build up the dirt to about 3 feet
    or so so that it will not erode over time.
    One thought I had was to stack milk crates on top of each other (bolt them together) and put sandbags
    on the bottom to hold them down, then cover with dirt. The waterfall reservoir will sit on top of them with
    dirt and rock surrounding it. Meanwhile I am thinking of using a combination of sandbags and rocks
    around the base of the (mound of dirt) to minimize erosion. I have not seen any info on building up the
    dirt like this, so I am making stuff up as I go.
    Does anyone out there have any ideas or suggestions for a proper way to to this, or am I on the right track?
    I am also new to any type of forum so I hope this is not too long...
     
    dahavishnu, Jan 4, 2012
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. dahavishnu

    sissy sissy

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2011
    Messages:
    30,025
    Likes Received:
    13,303
    Location:
    Axton virginia
    well welcome and I hope we can give you some great ideas .The sand bags will rot and break down after awhile .It should not hurt anything unless you get a really large rainfall and the sand may have a chance to run into the pond .But not really sure that will happen or not depends on how close they are .
     
    sissy, Jan 4, 2012
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. dahavishnu

    DrCase Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    Messages:
    4,395
    Likes Received:
    772
    Location:
    Arkansas
    Welcome to the Forum !!
    I could see stair stepping the milk crates around a 55 gal drum or stock tank that you can use for a filter.
    I would put a liner over all of the crates directing all the water into the pond, then stack the rocks on top
     
    DrCase, Jan 4, 2012
    #3
  4. dahavishnu

    taherrmann4 Tmann

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2011
    Messages:
    3,142
    Likes Received:
    675
    Location:
    Louisville KY
    Welcome to the pond forum....
     
    taherrmann4, Jan 5, 2012
    #4
  5. dahavishnu

    koiguy1969 GIGGETY-GIGGETY!!

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2008
    Messages:
    10,542
    Likes Received:
    6,234
    Location:
    Michigan zone 5b
    I BUILT MY WATERFALL WITH THE DIRT FROM THE POND DIG....
     
    koiguy1969, Jan 5, 2012
    #5
  6. dahavishnu

    taherrmann4 Tmann

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2011
    Messages:
    3,142
    Likes Received:
    675
    Location:
    Louisville KY
    As Koiguy stated use the dirt from the pond hole and pile it up and shape however you want it. It won't erode if you put rocks, and plants around it then mulch over it. there will be some settling but not much erosion. I took all the dirt from the hole I dug and pilled it up on top of the small hill I already had and have had no errosion issues once you get plants and mulch on it as well as some well placed rocks.
     
    taherrmann4, Jan 5, 2012
    #6
  7. dahavishnu

    j.w I Love my Goldies

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2010
    Messages:
    23,874
    Likes Received:
    13,507
    Location:
    Arlington, Washington
    My first pond I just used tons of rocks and built a big mound w/ a bowl formed in the center where the hose from the pump poured in. I used liner to cover the front of it and into the bowl and then put more rocks around over the liner to hide it. That worked fine til I decided to build a new bigger pond. For my new falls my hubby built me a stainless steel water filter barrel and I put liner over the front into the inside and then surrounded the outside w/ rocks. Hose goes through bottom side of barrel and water fills up and runs over for the falls. You could do the same w/ a plastic barrel filter.
     
    j.w, Jan 5, 2012
    #7
  8. dahavishnu

    kraljcojo

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Croatia
    I will put my pictures of garden and pond afternoon I'am at work right now that you can see,and when you see it,I will ask you some questions about your experince with ponds
     
    kraljcojo, Jan 5, 2012
    #8
  9. dahavishnu

    Waterbug

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2010
    Messages:
    3,195
    Likes Received:
    1,260
    Location:
    Phoenix AZ
    Depends on soil, how much rain you get, what you're going to plant, and how long you want the waterfall to last. Generally just soil will result in issues. The risk is reduced the wider the mound which reduces the slope. I like perfectly leveled terraces which will last for decades and I never have to worry about. I like something dogs and kids can climb on, and I can garden on without having to worry about damage.

    I don't know your soil or local conditions but I would not expect milk crates to slow down erosion at all. The openings are way too big. You could line the inside with landscape fabric. Pretty good chance of the crates breaking over time, they just aren't build for that type of load. And if exposed to sun they would breakdown in just a couple of years.

    The plastic mesh sand bags break down in the sun in just a couple of years and the millions of tiny bits of plastic make a big mess. You can use burlap bags filled with concrete. The fabric will break down but that's fine. The concrete left behind is not completely unattractive, but not very natural either imo.

    Crates and bags are ugly imo. If you're planning on covering with dirt there's a Catch-22. If the covering dirt stays in place then the crates/bags weren't needed in the first place. But of course the covering dirt does wash away and expose the foundation.

    I've had some luck with just stacked rock especially when backed by landscape fabric. However the gaps between rocks at the very top can be a source of erosion which I find to be a pain to have to continuously deal with.

    I build terraces two ways, or a combination. Big hollow fake rocks, chicken wire or mesh covered with mortar. Or concrete block, bond beam type. I then make fake rock to cover the block face. You can vary the depth of each terrace so it doesn't look uniform. Plants can cover the entire structure if you like.

    So it really comes down to what you want. You're right to be concerned with settling and erosion. Waterfalls are the #1 source of leaks, many of which occur after a could of years.
     
    Waterbug, Jan 5, 2012
    #9
  10. dahavishnu

    Becky Administrator

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2011
    Messages:
    2,146
    Likes Received:
    1,301
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    Hello and welcome to the forums! :wave:
     
    Becky, Jan 5, 2012
    #10
  11. dahavishnu

    j.w I Love my Goldies

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2010
    Messages:
    23,874
    Likes Received:
    13,507
    Location:
    Arlington, Washington
    Oops forgot to welcome you dahavishnu [​IMG]
     
    j.w, Jan 5, 2012
    #11
  12. dahavishnu

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    Messages:
    32,360
    Likes Received:
    16,644
    Location:
    Frederick, Maryland
    [​IMG]

    Welcome to our group!

    In phoenix I used dirt to make mounds, hills etc around our yard from our pond dig (it was a acre, all flat grass covered). Covered them with rocks, crushed granite etc, the mounds have never eroded, but phoenix is pretty dry, we do get some horrendous rain falls. The mounds were 2-4 feet high.

    Here in Maryland, the downhill side of my bog is a berm, made out of dirt, 5 foot high, compacted by the tractor. I put rocks over it, shale type rocks, planted plants, ornamental grasses no erosion happening. And we get rain/snow/freeze/thaw here.
     
    addy1, Jan 6, 2012
    #12
  13. dahavishnu

    kraljcojo

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Croatia
    Thanks everyone ,but I want to ask you something,first my pond is 700liters and it is 50 cm deep made of stone around also bottem is made of stone,what is the best to put on bottem of pond sand or something else,second question is what fish do you think that I can put in there if it is deep 50cm,winter is not very cold here but also I made cover of wood in the case of cold weather.I can by heaters.
     
    kraljcojo, Jan 8, 2012
    #13
  14. dahavishnu

    sissy sissy

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2011
    Messages:
    30,025
    Likes Received:
    13,303
    Location:
    Axton virginia
    are you talking about sand in the pond or sand under the liner .If you are talking under the liner any sand will do as long as it is sand with no stones in it .
     
    sissy, Jan 8, 2012
    #14
  15. dahavishnu

    j.w I Love my Goldies

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2010
    Messages:
    23,874
    Likes Received:
    13,507
    Location:
    Arlington, Washington
    Kral if you have a concrete pond and no leak problems and don't plan on putting a rubber liner over the concrete I would just leave it w/ nothing on the bottom so easier to clean w/ a net getting leaves and build up gunk out. If you put sand or rocks on the bottom it will be much harder to maintain but some do and it works for them. But I think they will say it is some what of a job. Some have rocks on all the sides inside the pond all the way down but leave the bottom clear of them. They use a hose to release some gunk that may build up on those rocks on the sides so it flows to the bottom where it is easier to scoop out. Myself I leave the bottom and the sides free of rocks and only put them on the top ledge around the pond edge. I do have a short ledge of a few inches down in the pond where I put rocks around there as it hides the liner and then I put more rocks on top of them around the pond edge as I stated.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    j.w, Jan 8, 2012
    #15
  16. dahavishnu

    kraljcojo

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Croatia
    [sub]Sissy I'm talking about sand to put on stone bottem, but they say is the best to put nothing because is easier to clean,my pond is all build of cement and after that I set the volcanic rock at the bottom and all around,it looks great but I thought this because of the cement pond is colder than the pond witch is made without cement only dig hole and put pond linar, so I think to put sand or something else to be warmer.Can you advise me more fish, I said that the pond 50 cm deep, which could take what we advise, as far as all the plants I learned about pripremio.malo me to write the English tend to go so sorry for that.[/sub]
     
    kraljcojo, Jan 9, 2012
    #16
  17. dahavishnu

    Waterbug

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2010
    Messages:
    3,195
    Likes Received:
    1,260
    Location:
    Phoenix AZ
    Sand certainly won't effect water temperature. There would also be no temperature difference between cement or liner or none. A dark surface can make water warmer but most ponds have a dark bottom regardless of building material because of algae and muck.

    Are you on the coast? In the mountains? How cold does it get?

    If you want to add sand there's no advantage I can think of but there's nothing wrong with sand either if that's what you'd like. You might want to wash the sand first. Depending on the source it can make the water muddy, at least for a few days.

    50 cm (20") isn't very deep and 700 liters (184 gals) isn't a lot of water. So Koi would not be a good choice. A few Goldfish would work depending on how extreme your temperatures. There's lots of minnow type fish that might work depending on temperture. Many kinds of catfish would work. What kinds of fish were you considering?
     
    Waterbug, Jan 9, 2012
    #17
  18. dahavishnu

    kraljcojo

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Croatia
    Yes, they told me that koi fish can not in such a shallow pond, then what do you say I take a gold fish, the temperature is low where I live because the town along the coast, I also made ​​a wooden cover over the winter so that the open pond just below the bridge, you have a picture to view my gallery, in case you are some extreme conditions.
     
    kraljcojo, Jan 9, 2012
    #18
  19. dahavishnu

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    Messages:
    32,360
    Likes Received:
    16,644
    Location:
    Frederick, Maryland
    As long as the water does not freeze your gold fish would do fine. Only put a in a few fish. Here in the winter, my pond water temperature gets into the 30 F temperatures. 0-3 C on the surface, not sure what the temperature is deep. The goldfish, shubunkins are doing fine.
     
    addy1, Jan 9, 2012
    #19
  20. dahavishnu

    kraljcojo

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Croatia
    I've already tested whether the freeze last winter because I just poured the water and watched whether frozen and I measured the temperature and it was all ok, but like I said what I have and covers for him in case of some extreme conditions,
     
    kraljcojo, Jan 9, 2012
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.