Metal above pond


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Hey guys,

brand new here and not sure where my question would best fit. We have an established pond in a cold area. Last year over winter we lost a lot of plants. This year it took a long time for the water to warm up and between lack of foliage and lots of sun, we fought algae. Our plants didn’t fully return until mid July. This winter we constructed a temporary greenhouse over our pond and it’s keeping things warm enough not to go into hibernation. Next year we would like to construct a prettier more permanent solution where we can use the frame for not only warmth, but shading the pond during times of direct sun. So my question, what metals can we use outside of our pond, but given humidity water will drip from. Hopefully there won’t be many areas where metal would be directly over our pond. Does anyone have suggestions. We aren’t trying to do this on the cheap, but obviously we are hoping to be realistic..:)
 
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j.w

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@Ani Mac
Stainless steel would be great but pricey. I don't think galvanized would be good or copper. Regular steel will rust. Why can't you use wood? @brokensword has a nice closed in cover for his pond. You could prolly winterize it too.

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Our current set up is wood, but it is bulky. We were hoping to have a metal frame made that would be less noticeable during nicer weather. I will check out stainless steel. I am not opposed to having something welded.
 
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j.w (By the way that is my Grandfather's name) Are they suggesting we coat materials with a sealant? Do you have any experience with this? I guess my question is does this include metals?
 

j.w

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The j in my initials stands for Janice, I'm not a grandfather tho, I'm a grandmother,lol! I have no clue on coating metal. My hubby is a stainless steel guy who worked for years in shops. He built me a waterfall container for my pond and he did not add any sealants to it but it does not need to look beautiful as it is unseen from the outside as it's covered w/rock. Stainless steel can get discolored and rusty looking tho and I'm sure there is prolly something that you can buy to keep it looking nicer. Just make sure it is pond friendly or not coming in contact w/your water.
 
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Why not look at a typical galvanized tube and car port / garage. If you look around there are models that are easy to take down and set up.
 

Doctor mcboy

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i would use aluminum if possible. stainless is heavy. hard to cut, hard to drill ,expensive. aluminum is light easy to cut and drill also cheaper and will not rust.
 
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A structure is a structure, but when it supports solar panels you get to deduct 26% of the whole system's cost off you income tax.
The regular panels are less than $200 each for typical 370W to 390W panels. Each panel is about 21 sq.ft., so less than $10 per square foot for the panels. The ones in the picture are double glass, bi-facial panels and have no aluminum frames. They cost about 25% more than regular, but they look a lot nicer.
I'm not selling anything here. No skin off my back whether anyone buys them or not. But the discussion was about what would provide shade, not look bad, and wouldn't rust or look crappy. I think a solar pergola meets all those requirements, and pays for itself in about 5 to 7 years plus saves money on the supporting structure as well.
 
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They look fantastic dont get me wrong.
They have come out with all kinds of great ideas with solar pannels I love some I saw they placed close to me on some low income housing go figure with what looks like slate tile roofing but were solar pannels.
 

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But remember solar panels are only as good as good as the amount of sun they get .Flat set panels that will get a snow load will not give you power and will also hold dirt more and dust and pollen .
 
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It's not the panels that have me question it's the batteries that are needed. and yes i know they are tesla I especially like his idea as to the wall back up power source to the generator. You basically are hanging a electric car battery on the wall
 
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