Native Gardening

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by JBtheExplorer, May 17, 2016.

  1. JBtheExplorer

    Nepen

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    2,183
    Likes Received:
    1,318
    Location:
    NC, US
    I bought Marsh Blazing Star and Meadow Blazing Star seeds. I wonder when is the good time to put the seed out in the ground?
     
    Nepen, Sep 8, 2016
    #81
    1. Advertisements

  2. JBtheExplorer

    JBtheExplorer Native Gardener

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    Messages:
    3,474
    Likes Received:
    5,636
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    For me, it's the day of the first decent snowfall. For you I'd suggest December, but really any time during the end of Fall or Winter.
     
    JBtheExplorer, Sep 8, 2016
    #82
    Gemma likes this.
    1. Advertisements

  3. JBtheExplorer

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    Messages:
    32,370
    Likes Received:
    16,659
    Location:
    Frederick, Maryland
    Here, anymore, I wait until spring. We have had warm falls, warm winters, the seeds start to germinate then they get smacked with a freeze and all die.
    I put out a ton of seed last fall, they all germinated, died during the 27F in april.
     
    addy1, Sep 8, 2016
    #83
    peter hillman likes this.
  4. JBtheExplorer

    Nepen

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    2,183
    Likes Received:
    1,318
    Location:
    NC, US
    Thanks @addy1 and @JBtheExplorer . That's interesting because it told me to put in fall, then i thought how it will survive winter. End of winter make sense. I'll have to stop my itchy fingers from plant them earlier!!!
     
    Nepen, Sep 8, 2016
    #84
    peter hillman likes this.
  5. JBtheExplorer

    JBtheExplorer Native Gardener

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    Messages:
    3,474
    Likes Received:
    5,636
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Just as long as they have enough time in cold weather. It's not about the seeds surviving the cold weather, that's not a problem. They actually need the cold weather in order to grow. Some seeds only need a few weeks of it, others need 2-3 months.


    By the way, here's my native garden today. Not much color left this time of year, but you can imagine what it'll look like next Summer! The whole left side is brand new this year. The area closest to the camera was added last year, and the area to the right was started two years ago. The garden surrounds my fire pit to make it feel a little like a campsite.
    IMG_2001 copy.jpg
     
    JBtheExplorer, Sep 9, 2016
    #85
    Gemma, tbendl and Nepen like this.
  6. JBtheExplorer

    tbendl T

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2014
    Messages:
    4,393
    Likes Received:
    4,207
    Location:
    Gulf Coast-Mississippi 8b
    Everything is so pretty JB. And you're right, it looks like the perfect spot to pitch a tent. :)
     
    tbendl, Sep 9, 2016
    #86
  7. JBtheExplorer

    JBtheExplorer Native Gardener

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    Messages:
    3,474
    Likes Received:
    5,636
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Adding on another 100-150 sq. ft. to the native garden. The addition is outlined in blue. I may consider making this area the focus of Monarch favorites like Meadow Blazing Star and New England Aster.

    GardenPlan2016.jpg
     
    JBtheExplorer, Sep 20, 2016
    #87
    Becky and Nepen like this.
  8. JBtheExplorer

    morewater President, Raccoon Haters International

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2014
    Messages:
    1,344
    Likes Received:
    1,663
    Location:
    Southern Ontario
    Ambitious.........love liatris.

    Check out the new cultivar of Echinichea........."Cheyenne Spirit".
     
    morewater, Sep 20, 2016
    #88
    Nepen likes this.
  9. JBtheExplorer

    Nepen

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    2,183
    Likes Received:
    1,318
    Location:
    NC, US
    you inspired me to do lots of thing, including this! I just made my new native wild flower bed last weekend (before the storm that washed away my topsoil). I got 6 pack of free seeds for pollinator that i'll put out later this year (they said it's native), will get a box of pollinator plants from Duke Garden (including golden rod and other plants probably not all native, i'll have to check), and some milkweed seeds coming in the mail. I'll plant a bunch of milkweeds. I know that common milkweed can be invasive so i'll have to be careful. I got Marsh blazing star and meadow blazing star and also bee balm too.
    The plot is 8x8. I think i'll get lots of butterfly and bees :)

    Any native flowers you recommend?
     
    Nepen, Sep 20, 2016
    #89
  10. JBtheExplorer

    JBtheExplorer Native Gardener

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    Messages:
    3,474
    Likes Received:
    5,636
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    8x8 is what I started with, it'll certainly attract butterflies and bees!
    I could recommend dozens, but with your 8x8 section here's the best (in my opinion) recommendations that would go great along with your milkweeds and blazing stars to help attract butterflies and bees.

    Smooth Oxeye (Helianthus helianthoides) is a good one. It's also called Early Sunflower and False Sunflower. It's one of my favorites and a great nectar source.

    New England Aster (Aster novae-angliae) is my favorite Autumn blooming-plant. It's a big help to Monarchs on their migration, since it's one of the last nectar sources for them. I saw a group of 5 or 6 Monarchs on one of these when I was hiking just last week.

    Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) is one of the best, if not the best, for attracting many species of butterflies.







    On a side note, I just found a New England Aster blooming in my own garden. I didn't realize they'd bloom in their first year. A nice surprise, since it'll be the final new blooming specie of 2016.

    IMG_2381 copy.jpg
     
    JBtheExplorer, Sep 20, 2016
    #90
    Nepen likes this.
  11. JBtheExplorer

    Nepen

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    2,183
    Likes Received:
    1,318
    Location:
    NC, US
    thanks. I think i'll get the Smooth Oxeye and the aster. I have many purple coneflower already :) In fact, I have many other type of coneflower, because i love them! I especially love the multi layers ones.
     
    Nepen, Sep 20, 2016
    #91
  12. JBtheExplorer

    JBtheExplorer Native Gardener

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    Messages:
    3,474
    Likes Received:
    5,636
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Autumn has arrived. As you can imagine, that means Autumn-blooming plants are just about all that's remaining.

    New England Aster, purple and pink.
    IMG_2383 copy.jpg

    Frost Aster
    IMG_2263 copy.jpg

    I'm unsure of this specie of Aster. This one seeded itself two years ago.
    IMG_2416 copy.jpg

    Great Blue Lobelia
    IMG_2403 copy.jpg

    Swamp Milkweed leaves.
    IMG_2406 copy.jpg

    and my first-year Smooth Oxeyes.
    IMG_2393 copy.jpg
     
    JBtheExplorer, Sep 22, 2016
    #92
    Nepen likes this.
  13. JBtheExplorer

    JBtheExplorer Native Gardener

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    Messages:
    3,474
    Likes Received:
    5,636
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    New England Asters are going to be a priority for me next year. I want to add as many as possible. Their color is outstanding, especially with the garden winding down and more gray, rainy days.
    IMG_2450 copy.jpg
    IMG_2451 copy.jpg
    IMG_2455 copy.jpg
    IMG_2457 copy.jpg
     
    JBtheExplorer, Sep 24, 2016
    #93
  14. JBtheExplorer

    Nepen

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    2,183
    Likes Received:
    1,318
    Location:
    NC, US
    @JBtheExplorer I went to your site for native garden, it's pretty nice. I think you have a typo on the side bar in About My Garden, with the picture of your milkweed on it.

    Do you have any recommend plant that's night too high? I have some space in the front and don't want it to be more than a foot or so in height.
     
    Nepen, Sep 26, 2016
    #94
  15. JBtheExplorer

    JBtheExplorer Native Gardener

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    Messages:
    3,474
    Likes Received:
    5,636
    Location:
    Wisconsin

    No typo, it's supposed to say "planning", if that's what you meant.

    I don't know of too many plants that are a foot or shorter. There are many, but most of what I plant are prairie plants, which are inherently taller. My only suggestions would be Blue-eyed Grass, Yellow Star Grass, or Bird's Foot Violet.
     
    JBtheExplorer, Sep 26, 2016
    #95
  16. JBtheExplorer

    Nepen

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    2,183
    Likes Received:
    1,318
    Location:
    NC, US
    no it was the word declining which it is correct now :)

    ha! those are interesting. I just ordered some blur-eyed grass. I think i'll stop now and see how much space I have next year before i over load them!
     
    Nepen, Sep 26, 2016
    #96
  17. JBtheExplorer

    JBtheExplorer Native Gardener

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    Messages:
    3,474
    Likes Received:
    5,636
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    I didn't change it, same photo that's always been there lol :LOL:

    Good luck with all of your native plants! (y)
     
    JBtheExplorer, Sep 26, 2016
    #97
  18. JBtheExplorer

    Nepen

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    2,183
    Likes Received:
    1,318
    Location:
    NC, US
    it's probably the glitch in the word. weird! :)
     
    Nepen, Sep 26, 2016
    #98
  19. JBtheExplorer

    Nepen

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    2,183
    Likes Received:
    1,318
    Location:
    NC, US
    ok this is my weird logic...

    Since in the wild, flowers turned to seeds then just dropped to the ground then grow on their own, right?. So... I thought seeds probably know when i grow and when not to grow... so i put my seeds out in the garden already, 3 weeks ago. Some grow, some dont (probably waiting for the right time).

    Now i'm here sitting, hoping that at least some of the seeds and seedling that I already put in will survive winter. And now i'm thinking I might have to buy the same seeds (the one i used up) again because my logic fail and the seeds in the ground will rot and die :(
     
    Nepen, Oct 12, 2016
    #99
  20. JBtheExplorer

    JBtheExplorer Native Gardener

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    Messages:
    3,474
    Likes Received:
    5,636
    Location:
    Wisconsin

    Any seedlings that grow around here in Autumn won't survive Winter. I'm not sure if that's different for your climate.
    There's a lot of different things that go into when a seed starts growing. Do you know which seedlings are growing?
    Sometimes, a wet Autumn will get some seedlings to grow. Also, while seeds typically start dropping in Autumn, many don't actually drop until late Autumn or throughout Winter, when it is too cold for them to start growing. It could also depend on where you got your seeds from. It's possible that the seller already stratified the seeds or at least kept them in a fridge which may have been enough to trick the seeds once you put them outdoors in warmer conditions. Sometimes they can just randomly decide to grow, too. Last year, I had a couple milkweed seeds start growing right on the seed pod before I could harvest them. Seeds are like people. They have rules, but there's always some that don't follow them.

    I always wait until December to put seeds out, when the average temps are in the mid-30's.
     
    JBtheExplorer, Oct 12, 2016
    Nepen likes this.
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.