New Old Pond needs Help!!


Joined
Apr 14, 2019
Messages
19
Reaction score
3
Location
Minneapolis, MN
Hardiness Zone
4b
Country
Hi all! I’m new to GPForum and new to Ponds.

We have a 1940 pond with a waterfall wall (about 6’ tall) which contains a splash basin.

Pond is 6’8” round x 22” deep = 479 US Gallons

According to pond.com, we have a 479 US Gallon pond so the minimum pump required is 240 GPH. The water will need to be pumped about 6 ft up (8 ft from bottom of pond). I estimate we will need 7’-10’ feet of hose to go from pump to top of waterfall wall depending on whether we have a submersible pump or an exterior pump. I know the Friction Head formula is 1 ft per 10 ft of hose.

How do I figure what the Static Head is?

Also, do I need a filter in addition to pump?

Can anyone recommend a brand(s) and what kind of pump (mag-drive, hybrid, etc.) and/or filter to get? I would like to be able to adjust the flow of water from a trickle to more for maximum sound enjoyment.

Thanks all!!
 

Attachments

Joined
Nov 28, 2017
Messages
1,239
Reaction score
843
Location
North Oklahoma
Hardiness Zone
7a
Country
First off, where are you located, and what’s your plan? If you want fish, you need to double your water volume per hour through the filter. So instead of 479 gph, I’d round up to 900-1000 gph. The pump just moves water, the filter cleans it. It’s up to you if you want a separate filter or one that goes with your pump or a diy one you add to your pump.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Oct 28, 2013
Messages
7,261
Reaction score
8,193
Location
Northern IL
There are online calculators that will figure static head pressure if you google it. We just did this a few weeks ago. They ask you how high from the surface of the pond you are pumping, how long and what size the line is, how many turns, what angles, waterfall width etc. You plug in all the information and get an answer. I can't tell you more than that because once the math started, I walked away. o_O

Here's one example:

 
Joined
May 5, 2013
Messages
893
Reaction score
435
Location
Le Roy, New York
I wouldn't worry about all those calculations. Look for one that pumps around 1000 gallons per hour and has about a 10 foot head. Too much is better than too little. To slow it down use a valve.
 
Joined
Oct 28, 2013
Messages
7,261
Reaction score
8,193
Location
Northern IL
I wouldn't worry about all those calculations. Look for one that pumps around 1000 gallons per hour and has about a 10 foot head. Too much is better than too little. To slow it down use a valve.
I agree with you actually. However the OP asked how to calculate it. A ball valve is a great option for adjusting flow.

And sorry @GBrant - I don't know a whole lot about types of pumps. Remind me - do you plan to have fish? If your pump is submersible, you'll want some kind of pre-filtration to keep the pump from getting clogged. There are several options - let us know what kind of pump you choose and people can share what they use. (I don't know anything about external pumps.)
 
Joined
Apr 14, 2019
Messages
19
Reaction score
3
Location
Minneapolis, MN
Hardiness Zone
4b
Country
There are online calculators that will figure static head pressure if you google it. We just did this a few weeks ago. They ask you how high from the surface of the pond you are pumping, how long and what size the line is, how many turns, what angles, waterfall width etc. You plug in all the information and get an answer. I can't tell you more than that because once the math started, I walked away. o_O

Here's one example:

Thank you!! I feel ya re: math!
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 14, 2019
Messages
19
Reaction score
3
Location
Minneapolis, MN
Hardiness Zone
4b
Country
I wouldn't worry about all those calculations. Look for one that pumps around 1000 gallons per hour and has about a 10 foot head. Too much is better than too little. To slow it down use a valve.
Thanks! I like that a lot better!!
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top