Pond addition or saltwater tank?


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Okay, here was my plan. In the spring add onto existing pond which is approx 2000 gal by adding a new section approx 4' wide 8' long and 4' deep. However recent health concerns make building this addition touchy. I'm a DIY person and won't even consider a professional service, least of all their costs. I'm the type who needs a project and building is a big part of my enjoyment. So, my thought was including a saltwater tank into the bookcase I want to build in the basement. I need to consider the cost factor and of course what my wife thinks. Also, which will give me the most enjoyment.

Part of me is upset I didn't go bigger with the pond but the thought of seaming together 2 liners is a bit of a concern. Plus there is the issue of my health. On the other hand I do enjoy the idea of a larger pond.

Then there's the SW tank. I've always loved these. I was thinking somewhere around 150 gallon. Possibly even making it a reef tank with just a few fish. This would also give me year round enjoyment. However these can be tricky to keep up and costly as well.

What to do....
 
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sissy

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well since you already have a pond it depends on the amount of work and money you want to put into the project and what you would enjoy more of .plus I know fish are supposed to be good for your blood pressure
 

addy1

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I had salt water tanks, years ago, many years ago, things are a lot further along now in the care of them. Beautiful tanks, neat colorful fish, shrimp. Since you have a pond, go for the tank. You will love it.
 
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What would you like to keep in your sw tank? Soft corals, LPS, SPS?
Which fish did you have in mind?
What you choose out of those will really determine what your costs will be.
 

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Unless someone has figured out a way to prevent salt creep around a marine tank, I would think twice before building one into a bookcase, and then decide against it! :disappointed_anim:
John
 
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Reefs take a lot of money and time and maintenance. How about a FOWLR? Less maintenance, still looks good. Also, Haro makes a good point. Warm water, salt, humidity....not good around wood.
 
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JBtheExplorer

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I'm not a tank person, so I'd say pond addition, but if health is a factor, I think only you can decide.
 
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In reality a FOWLR tank would be the more economical and easier to maintain instead of a reef tank. Reefs are beautiful but are for much more experienced hobbiests than myself. This would only be my second salt tank. The first didn't last long because of an unforeseen move.

Types of fish I'd consider would be angels, gobies, clowns, trigger, surgeon etc., depending on tank size and compatability of course.

As far as the wood, I'd use Teak or Ipe around the perimeter. The Teak on the deck of the USS New Jersey looks new after 70 years!! The books...well that's another story:).
 
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If you're going to go with a FOWLR, make sure you plan for a good filtration system. Triggers are messy, angelfish can get pretty big, and if you're going to get a surgeon (tang) fish, that tank is really only big enough for 1, maybe a Kole tang, which would be a good one for eating any algae that crops up.
Try and find a good LFS that will save you some money in the long run. The key is finding someone there that is knowledgeable, not someone who just wants to sell you inappropriate fish and equipment.
 
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To me, there is nothing around the home or even the neighborhood that can be enjoyed as much as or be as relaxing as a pond. The salt water tank sounds nifty but is continual work if I understand correctly. No thanks. If you can handle the pond work, or get some friends or family to help, that is the no brainer answer to me. Much less work after the initial build.
 
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Saltwater tanks are just a little more work that freshwater tanks, if they are understood correctly.
Problems happen when people mix together different corals and fish without understanding what they're putting together and why it won't work.
Also, you cannot have a substrate in a saltwater tank like you can in a freshwater tank. A bare bottom aquarium is best, or with maybe a 1/4" sand bottom for appearance only.
You will get endless algae problems if you have a deeper substrate and don't understand what's going on in it.
 
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Does anyone know a good name in acrylic tank suppliers? My 65 gal is acrylic but I'm not sure who made it. The place where I bought it is no longer there. I know they are expensive but side by side with glass they are superior in clarity.
 

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