Pond Plant Order for 2020


Joined
Jul 14, 2018
Messages
506
Reaction score
445
Location
Huntsville, AL
Hardiness Zone
7B
Country
United States
Our pond survived the winter weather. We had clear water and no real problems. We finally got to see the trap door snails that we thought were gone. Over the summer the pond was green with algae but the fish thrived and reproduced at least 3 different times. The result is the five shubunkins we started with are now joined by 10-14 new guys. So, I need to solve the green water problem that plagued us all summer. Basically our bog plants just did not thrive.

I believe my very green water was because our water is very hard so many of the bog plants just did not do well. The oxygenating underwater plants did great (pickerell rush, water lilies, red ludwigia, and hornwort). What is left in the bog is one bloody dock, varigated water celery, 2 sedge plants and many bulb plants (Callas lilies) that are dormant now. So I am trying a different group of plants for this year. I just ordered them from Lillyblooms. I ordered 2 of each thinking that I will order more of whatever thrives. I have low expectations after last years experience so this is like an experiment to see what works. During the year, I did try slowing the water flow through the bog and also tried increasing the water flow. No noticable change occured based on these changes.

Variegated Arrowhead (Sagittaria graminea)
Arrowhead
(Sagittaria latifolia)
Lance-Leafed Arrowhead (Sagittaria graminea)
Dwarf Horsetail Rush (Equisetum scirpoides)
Four Leaf Water Clover (Marsilea mutica)
Dwarf Variegated Sweet Flag (Acorus gramineus variegatus)

Water Willow (Justicia americana)


In my garage I wintered over 2 large spider lilies that each have two new small sprouts and a pot of dwarf bamboo that all floated in my pond last year. I will probably put them in the bog this year depending on the size of the plants I receive from Lillyblooms.

For those interested my pond is about 2,500 gallons with a large lower pond and a small upper pond filled with hornwort and red luiwigia, an aquascape waterfall with red luwigia growing on top and a pea gravel bog. The bog is 18 inches deep and about 10% the size of the ponds. My water pump in an aquascape skimmer that pumps 3,500 gallons per hour through 2 inch PVC lines to the bog, the waterfall and the upper pond. A Matala Hakko MEA Pro EZ-air pond aeration system churns the water in the deep end.

Attached is a photo of the original 5 and some of the new guys. I fed them winter food all through the winter whenever the water temp was above 45 degrees F. Under 45 degrees they were inactive but that was not very many days as we had a very mild winter this year.

I hope this help someone who may be having bog plants that just are not doing the job. Looking forward to a great pond year with much less floating (microscopic) algae.

Dan
 

Attachments

Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
128
Reaction score
201
Location
Purlear, NC
Hardiness Zone
7a
Country
United States
Yeah, sometimes you have to try different things to see what's gonna work best in your pond (applies to garden plants as well) Also, in my experience, many aquatic plants will struggle a bit in a brand new pond until it seasons for a year or two. In the beginning there just isn't the high nutrient load to support the best growth. After that, though, look out! You find yourself throwing the excess away by the bucket-full all summer long! lol
Here's to a great upcoming ponding season!
 

addy1

water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins
Moderator
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
36,417
Reaction score
20,988
Location
Frederick, Maryland
Hardiness Zone
6b
Country
United States
Thanks for the encouragement. My hornwort that I thought all died early last year is now a total forest in my upper pond.
The deep end of my pond is nothing but hornwort and the fish love it! I watch them eating it all winter. I have yanked and tossed some of it, the stuff that wandered down to the lily area. Some has wandered into the lotus tub, the fishless small ponds but it has not gotten a good foothold on them. The lotus take over once they start growing.
 
Joined
Jul 14, 2018
Messages
506
Reaction score
445
Location
Huntsville, AL
Hardiness Zone
7B
Country
United States
The pond water is so clear today. I have a bunch of string algae hanging on the water fall that I plan on removing after the bog plants start-up. It looks like we may have a few more frosty nights before the plants get going.
 
Joined
Oct 28, 2013
Messages
8,807
Reaction score
9,417
Location
Northern IL
Also, in my experience, many aquatic plants will struggle a bit in a brand new pond until it seasons for a year or two.
That was exactly my experience. Our first couple of years we had to fertilize every single plant in our pond and bog - they all looked yellow and just sad. Year three - everything took off and we've never had an issue getting things to grow since. Now we have the opposite issue - keeping things from OVERGROWING!
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Nov 11, 2010
Messages
3,470
Reaction score
3,092
Location
Chicago Area
Hardiness Zone
5b
Country
United States
Our pond survived the winter weather. We had clear water and no real problems. We finally got to see the trap door snails that we thought were gone. Over the summer the pond was green with algae but the fish thrived and reproduced at least 3 different times. The result is the five shubunkins we started with are now joined by 10-14 new guys. So, I need to solve the green water problem that plagued us all summer. Basically our bog plants just did not thrive.

I believe my very green water was because our water is very hard so many of the bog plants just did not do well. The oxygenating underwater plants did great (pickerell rush, water lilies, red ludwigia, and hornwort). What is left in the bog is one bloody dock, varigated water celery, 2 sedge plants and many bulb plants (Callas lilies) that are dormant now. So I am trying a different group of plants for this year. I just ordered them from Lillyblooms. I ordered 2 of each thinking that I will order more of whatever thrives. I have low expectations after last years experience so this is like an experiment to see what works. During the year, I did try slowing the water flow through the bog and also tried increasing the water flow. No noticable change occured based on these changes.

Variegated Arrowhead (Sagittaria graminea)
Arrowhead
(Sagittaria latifolia)
Lance-Leafed Arrowhead (Sagittaria graminea)
Dwarf Horsetail Rush (Equisetum scirpoides)
Four Leaf Water Clover (Marsilea mutica)
Dwarf Variegated Sweet Flag (Acorus gramineus variegatus)

Water Willow (Justicia americana)


In my garage I wintered over 2 large spider lilies that each have two new small sprouts and a pot of dwarf bamboo that all floated in my pond last year. I will probably put them in the bog this year depending on the size of the plants I receive from Lillyblooms.

For those interested my pond is about 2,500 gallons with a large lower pond and a small upper pond filled with hornwort and red luiwigia, an aquascape waterfall with red luwigia growing on top and a pea gravel bog. The bog is 18 inches deep and about 10% the size of the ponds. My water pump in an aquascape skimmer that pumps 3,500 gallons per hour through 2 inch PVC lines to the bog, the waterfall and the upper pond. A Matala Hakko MEA Pro EZ-air pond aeration system churns the water in the deep end.

Attached is a photo of the original 5 and some of the new guys. I fed them winter food all through the winter whenever the water temp was above 45 degrees F. Under 45 degrees they were inactive but that was not very many days as we had a very mild winter this year.

I hope this help someone who may be having bog plants that just are not doing the job. Looking forward to a great pond year with much less floating (microscopic) algae.

Dan
Hi. Very pretty fish. The green water is probably from either too many nutrients in the water or your pond being in direct sunlight or both. It's fun to feed your fish, but they really don't need food under 55 degrees. I don't know how often and how much you feed your fish in the warmer months, but I'm guessing you may need to cut down a little.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top