Pump-pressure filter match


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I'm adding supplemental filtration to my pond, which I will explain after reviewing what I've got in place already as well as my reason for thinking I should add this extra filter. My specific concern is with the pump-filter match, but I would welcome any feedback or insights that anyone might happen to have about the whole picture.

First, the background: I had an algae bloom when Spring started, which cycled out and got totally clear after I finally was able to add a bunch of plants to my pond and stream. Then, we got hit with endless rain for a couple of weeks, and my pond has been dense with algae ever since, though it's been getting better with water changes. I thought a lot of the problem was from overfeeding, and that might have contributed some, but probably not too much, since I really wasn't overfeeding as bad as I initially thought. I now think the main cause was run-off from the rain. I made some more rookie mistakes in a couple of places with poor berm alignments and mulch and whatnot, and I'm in the process of fixing all that. Whatever the main cause of the ongoing algae bloom, the overall situation led me to think that I could probably stand to add a lot more filtration, which could kind of "future proof" things somewhat.

Here's what I have now: a skimmer filter with a 4,800 gph pump leading to a waterfall that I'd guess is around 4 feet above the surface of the pond. I hose off the pad from the skimmer every day. The waterfall has two bags of lava rocks and one bag of little cut-up sponge pieces for biofiltration, with water hyacinths floating on top. The waterfall flows into a stream that's at least 15 feet long that has a corkscrew rush, creeping jenny, lemon bacopa, sweet flag, and parrot feather in it. The pond itself has a couple of lilies, hornwort, more parrot feather, another small sweet flag, another corkscrew rush, and an clump of irises--not a huge amount given its surface area. I'm adding a bunch more plants this weekend. The pond is in full sun all day, and there isn't a lot I can do about that other than adding more plant cover inside the pond, which I'm working on.

This is what I'm preparing to add--and I apologize for the long preface. I got a Laguna Pressure Flo 3000 with UV light and a Tetra debris-handling pump (4,200 gph). I'm going to add another small waterfall in one of the areas where I'm getting some run-off, so I figure I'll kill two birds with one stone there. I know folks here aren't so keen on Tetra products, but it has a 3-year warranty and low wattage, so it should be cheap to run for 3 years at least. I'm a little worried that its flow might be too high for the pressure filter, though. I'm using 1 1/4-inch flex pvc tubing to connect everything, hoping that this size strikes the right balance between maintaining good flow for the waterfall but restricting the pressure somewhat. But is the pump's flow in fact too much for the filter? I wanted to add a pump inside the pond to get the stuff that falls to the pond floor without reaching the skimmer and see this as primarily a supplement to the existing arrangement, so if necessary I can return the pump for a smaller one. For a change, I figured I'd ask BEFORE actually installing something--probably incorrectly--and I do appreciate everyone's insights and help as always.
 
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sissy

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Plus the slower water goes past the uv the better it will work .What is the uv in wattage .I only put water in my uv at 150 gph and it is 18 watt and one of those twist types ,where the water runs around the uv before it exits .I use a small hose also at 1/4 inch
 
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Thank you both. I was worried the flow would be too strong. I believe the UV is 24-watt; it's embedded within the pressure filter. I'll get the 2000 gph Lagina to be safe and return the Tetra. Thank you again.
 

Meyer Jordan

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You could use the Tetra pump if you split the outflow line. One leading to the filter and one leading to a waterfall. A simple ball valve on either of the lines will control the flow rate to the filter.
 

sissy

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I say more is better but always wonder about those pressure filters with built in UV's to how long the water comes in contact with the uv and if it even works as good as they say they do .The more water movement in a pond helps it stay clearer ,at least that is what I see with my pond .I have a pvc pipe connected to my hose on the bottom of my pond and extra water goes into it and pvc has holes drilled in it to move water on the bottom of the pond .IU can regulate how much water goes to the filter and how much goes to the bottom of the pond .
 
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I say more is better but always wonder about those pressure filters with built in UV's to how long the water comes in contact with the uv and if it even works as good as they say they do .The more water movement in a pond helps it stay clearer ,at least that is what I see with my pond .I have a pvc pipe connected to my hose on the bottom of my pond and extra water goes into it and pvc has holes drilled in it to move water on the bottom of the pond .IU can regulate how much water goes to the filter and how much goes to the bottom of the pond .
I see the UV as kind of a bonus add-on. The main attraction of the pressure filter for me is the easy (I hope) back-wash feature. Since I'm hosing off my skimmer mat daily, I can just as easily just do a quick backwash while I'm at it. Once the algae is under control, I'm hoping that the plants and stream will do most of the heavily lifting and I can deal with the filters maybe every other day. The other attractions of the filter are that it gives me an excuse to add another small waterfall and more fish.
 

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I'm not sure how big your pond is or how many fish you have. I have had several of the pressure filters but after a short time, the backwash feature didn't do the trick and had to open the filter up and totally clean the media. Not a fun job! How many gallons is your pond and number and type of fish? If you are thinking of adding more fish then the pressure filter may not do the trick.
 

sissy

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Oh yeh they can smell like an open sewer .I had one on my preformed and it was bigger than I needed but back washing every day and it seemed to not help with anything .
 
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I'm not sure how big your pond is or how many fish you have. I have had several of the pressure filters but after a short time, the backwash feature didn't do the trick and had to open the filter up and totally clean the media. Not a fun job! How many gallons is your pond and number and type of fish? If you are thinking of adding more fish then the pressure filter may not do the trick.
Opening up the filter is definitely not something I want to do. My pond is somewhere in the vicinity of 1800-2000 gallons; I'm not quite sure. I have 3 koi, 4 orfe, and 5 or 6 goldfish (shubunkins, comets, etc.) I know that the filter alone won't handle what I've got. It's a supplement.

I already have a 4800 gph pump, two waterfalls and a stream that's 15-20 feet long and lined with pond stone and plants. My pond store is having a half off sale on plants this weekend, and I'm going to stock up big time. I'd like to be able to rely on what I've got, plus the plants as my primary source of filtration. I also just got a pond vac, but with the algae being so bad, I can't see what I'd be vacuuming, so I fell like I'm in a bit of a catch-22 with it. I'm hoping that once I've got the current situation under control, I can add the new filter, and then I'll be in position to add fish if the mood strikes. I'm holding off on doing that anyway for the time being, though, because I don't know if baby fish are happening. My pond is opaque, both literally and metaphorically. It's a bit of a mystery to me what's going on in there right now.

I'm attaching a couple of pictures from my pond from 5 or 6 weeks ago, after the initial spring algae bloom had cleared but before the new one struck. In many ways, it's already changed a lot since then, and not only because of the pea soup water.

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The only thing that changed between the events is the rain. I think it washed a decent amount of mulch into the pond. Two other things also happened. In the bottom picture, which shows just the pond, you can see a firethorn in full bloom in the far upper left corner, and on the right side you can see a large earthen planter. During all that rain, there were also some very windy days, and every single petal from every single one of those teeny tiny firethorn flowers blew into the pond. I scooped out what I could, but I know I missed a tone. And that planter, I believe, was leaching nutrients through its drain hole at the bottom. It's since been removed from the pond. Whenever the lawn gets mowed, bits of grass inevitably find their way into the pond or stream as well. But mostly, I think, it was the rain.

I'm trying to patient and hope that maybe the pond needs another cycling, too. I didn't use any treatments the first time, because I knew it was just the Spring algae bloom, which I understood to be par for the course. I've been using Algaefix and Ecofix together this time, though. I don't plan to replace either one after they run out. I'm really hoping the plants and new filter can keep the pond clear.
 

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The only thing that changed between the events is the rain. I think it washed a decent amount of mulch into the pond. Two other things also happened. In the bottom picture, which shows just the pond, you can see a firethorn in full bloom in the far upper left corner, and on the right side you can see a large earthen planter. During all that rain, there were also some very windy days, and every single petal from every single one of those teeny tiny firethorn flowers blew into the pond. I scooped out what I could, but I know I missed a tone. And that planter, I believe, was leaching nutrients through its drain hole at the bottom. It's since been removed from the pond. Whenever the lawn gets mowed, bits of grass inevitably find their way into the pond or stream as well. But mostly, I think, it was the rain.

I'm trying to patient and hope that maybe the pond needs another cycling, too. I didn't use any treatments the first time, because I knew it was just the Spring algae bloom, which I understood to be par for the course. I've been using Algaefix and Ecofix together this time, though. I don't plan to replace either one after they run out. I'm really hoping the plants and new filter can keep the pond clear.

All of that extra organic material may well have triggered the second bloom, Algidcides never permanently solve an algae issue. neither will additional biofiltration, Additional plants will certainly be beneficial, especially a diversity.
 
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So far the algicide hasn't even offered a temporary solution, let alone a permanent one. I'm frankly hoping that the Ecofix, which is supposed to eat the some of the sludge, is working more than the Algaefix. I see its benefit as having more potential longevity. My fingers are crossed for the plants doing the trick. In addition to doing their plant stuff, they will provide additional shade. The pond gets full sun, all day, which can't be helping.
 
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I don't know for sure. My guess is only a thin coating, but I can't see. I'll know more tomorrow after I go in to put the new plants in. But the pond is still less than a year old, so I can't imagine too much has accumulated yet. I wonder about my lilies, too. One of the plants has been quite prolific, and if I had to guess, at least 10 flowers have already come and gone since it started blooming in late April. The other one has produced maybe 5 more. I think I need to take those flowers off and out; they're down at the bottom. The nooks and crannies behind the rocks around the perimeter concern me, too; I've seen sludge there, and under the rocks in the stream. One of the first things I want to do when I can see clearly is vacuum the pond. I'm thinking I might out my air stones in, too.
 
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As always, I appreciate everyone's help, but yours especially, Meyer. You are very generous with your expertise. You've really helped me figure a lot of things out. Ponds involve quite the learning curve.
 

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As always, I appreciate everyone's help, but yours especially, Meyer. You are very generous with your expertise. You've really helped me figure a lot of things out. Ponds involve quite the learning curve.

You are most welcome.
I would not be concerned about any sediment that accumulates between the rocks in the pond or the stream. A certain amount is actually beneficial to the overall ecology of the pond though it may not be too pleasing to look at. Certain micro- and meio-organisms live only in this sediment and their presence only adds to the overall biological diversity of the pond not to mention augment the natural food chain.
 
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You just saved the lives of those little microorganisms. I thought that if sediment under/behind the rocks accumulates too much, there could be a release of toxic gasses at some point in the future. Is there a way to tell when the muck needs to be addressed for that reason?
 
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sissy

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You are a lucky one as others have posted on here that algaefix has killed or caused problems with the fish they have .I call it suicide in a bottle .
 

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