Relocating a pond

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by pondlover, Jan 11, 2012.

  1. pondlover

    pondlover Bogs are good for more than just your pond!

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    Has anyone had any success with relocating and pond? Including fish? Reusing the same liner?
     
    pondlover, Jan 11, 2012
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  2. pondlover

    sissy sissy

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    I have taken apart abandoned ponds and relocated the fish to new ponds and sold some of them and gave the liner I took out to some people I met that were putting in a new pond .I have also had my liner ripped by a neighbor and had to put my large fish in a big plastic tank I got from tractor supply until I put in the new liner .I still have a couple preformed ponds because of that .People get foreclosed on and abandon the ponds and they real estate agent called me after I met her when I bought another home that she had listed since she had seen pics of my pond and knew the house I bought had an abandoned pond .
     
    sissy, Jan 11, 2012
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  3. pondlover

    j.w I Love my Goldies

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    I moved my whole pond that had been in one spot for a few yrs.......liner, plants, fish from one side of our walkway to the other side. Only sad thing was lost a few fish cuz they hid in the rocks around the top edge in the water and when I lowered the water level to remove the fish I didn't know those few were hidden and they were discovered way too late. All else is doing fine and it's been several yrs since. People do it all the time so if you have the chance go for it. I used some of my old pond water in the new pond so as not to shock the fish w/ starting over w/ new water. I think the more of the old water you can use the better. And if there is an active filter system that you are acquiring also try and get that hooked up and running soon so you don't lose the good bacteria otherwise it dies after awhile and may pollute the new pond.
     
    j.w, Jan 11, 2012
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  4. pondlover

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

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    I have reused liner, just remove it carefully. Takes some work but it works
     
    addy1, Jan 11, 2012
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  5. pondlover

    sissy sissy

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    yeh liner sorta makes a sucking noise as you remove it if it has been wet out ,but if it has been dry out it comes up a lot easier .
     
    sissy, Jan 11, 2012
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  6. pondlover

    Jennywren

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    I think a lot would depend on the liner. If it is a good quality pond liner you shouldn't have any problems. Cheaper plastic type liners may not move as well.
     
    Jennywren, Jan 11, 2012
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  7. pondlover

    pondlover Bogs are good for more than just your pond!

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    We have the chance to purchase a 18x22 x 3.5 with two waterfalls, all rocks, liner 2 6000 gph pumps, w skimmers, pond vacuum, 300 gal trough to move fish. All plants and pond owner will help with reassembly. He said he used 7 slabs of Arkansas flat rock and one pallet of round river rock. That is on the bottom. Pond has nearly 100 fish. Some large 9" koi and some. CrAppie and catfish. Also includes all of the water Lillie's and other plants. Basically everything needed.
    All of this for $3,500.00. Sounds like a great price and its truly beautiful.
    Big prib. We have to move it !!!

    How do you do this and not kill the fish. We need too move it from Memphis to Jackson. It's about a two hour trip. Here are pics. Does Any one have any super idea for this. ????
     
    pondlover, Jan 12, 2012
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  8. pondlover

    pondlover Bogs are good for more than just your pond!

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    ok I am very challenged when it comes to attaching something to a post. I will press on. I think I can do it.
     

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    pondlover, Jan 12, 2012
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  9. pondlover

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

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    Very nice pond, pretty fish too. To do this you need to set up something to keep the fish in during your build. You will need some good filtration and water for those fish, they are nice sized and a lot of them. Others that have koi can tell you the minimum you can get away with during the move and build.

    That is great the pond owner will help with the reassembly. Get your hole dug first, before you even begin the move, stating the obvious lol. Don't clean the liner at all, well you can rinse it with pond water to remove any collection of muck. But you want to keep the fine algae in good shape.

    If you are on city water, have plenty of de chlor to treat the water as you fill the pond.

    I would not put the river rock back in the bottom, leave it empty of rock, easier to keep clean. Seven pallets of rock is a lot of weight, either a lot of trips or a big rock moving truck.

    The main issue you have is keeping the fish safe during the filling of the pond, getting the new water in the pond stable. You didn't mention the filters, it would be best if you can keep the media alive and in good shape.

    A lot of work coming up, but it sure will look great when you are done.
     
    addy1, Jan 12, 2012
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  10. pondlover

    pondlover Bogs are good for more than just your pond!

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    My main concern is the fish and their well being. Our thoughts were to dig our hole, put in new liner, then move fish and lastly move rock, etc. We would keep the old liner for future projects. Although I would love to be able to use it initially just not sure how we would place the fish in temporary quarters and how to do that. My husband has access to a dump trailer for transporting rocks. I am concerned about placing rocks in the pond after fish are in it. I've read mixed thoughts on placing rocks on the bottom of the pond. I'm thinking it would require someone being in the pond to do this and with it being the middle of winter that would have to wait till spring. :razz:

    It seems pretty overwhelming. LOL Owner says the filtration system is completely natural water fall filtration. I believe he referred to it as a clarifying pool. I'm not afraid of the work involved and actually look forward to that, its relocating the fish that worries me so. :goldfish:
    I appreciate any feedback and learning from others.
     
    pondlover, Jan 12, 2012
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  11. pondlover

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

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    With a new liner and new water, one of your concerns will be new pond syndrome. If you can put in a liner, the water and wait.........patiently for the water to cycle, then add just a few fish to get the water cycling some more, before you move the fish from the old pond into the new pond, the fish will be a lot better off.

    If it does not cycle you might lose some fish as the pond goes through the cycles.

    Here is some reading on new pond syndrome.

    http://www.ponddoc.com/WhatsUpDoc/WaterQuality/SeasoningPond.htm

    http://www.petsparade.co.uk/articles/?a=24

    http://www.koi-pond-guide.com/pond-stocking.html
     
    addy1, Jan 12, 2012
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  12. pondlover

    sissy sissy

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    I used a large plastic tank from tractor supply that I got and cut part of the top and made a bigger hole and pump pond water and some well water into it ,but first put the tank in the back of my truck and when i got them where they were going used a pump in the tank to provide oxygen and then added air pump and set up temp. filter until i could get them moved into pond ,but pond was already set up so did not have to wait .With my pond rebuild did the same thing but worked day and night to replace liner and get fish back in in 5 days .What I did was try to get the bigger ones in first because they stress more .Once I got enough water in the pond got them in but waited to do the rest until i got them in .Pond was the first thing water falls and filters where last .Only a foot of water in pond when I put my biggest 2 koi back in .Those are alot more fish than I dealt with .I would buy a new liner and get the pond in first to get fish in fast .I know it seems a waste but it would cut down your risk of fish lose .Use some of the pond water from the original pond and well water if you have well water .Thats all I can think of .Big tank to store them in is not cheap 300 or 400 dollars .I got a damaged one and got it dirt cheap .Damage was near the opening and cap was missing ,no big deal there .At least it is winter and a tiny bit easier summers a nightmare and even spring when they are getting ready to spawn .
     
    sissy, Jan 12, 2012
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  13. pondlover

    sissy sissy

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    maybe someone can tell you here how long you can safely keep them in a tank like that ,I just can't help there .Only one pond I took out was a liner pond others were preformed .I wish it was easier ,but there is always a risk when moving fish .Not sure it would even work for you and what you have to do .
     
    sissy, Jan 12, 2012
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  14. pondlover

    j.w I Love my Goldies

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    What a neat find and the guy will help you install it. Can't beat that! Lots of pretty fish and plants! Sure would be nice if you could bring some of the water from the old pond to help cycle the new pond. Would be great if you could somehow get the old liner out to use it now but that involves a lot of work now and yep you need a healthy environment to keep the fish til you get it all done. When I moved mine I used a new liner (noticed up in my post above I said I moved old liner............I mis-spoke) but used the old water but it was easy as they were not far apart to do the transfer. I used the old liner for the falls and still have big pieces I use for this, that and the other. If you don't mind the expense of the new liner and can somehow get the water cycled and you can take your time it sure would be a lot easier.
     
    j.w, Jan 12, 2012
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  15. pondlover

    pondlover Bogs are good for more than just your pond!

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    I'm still unsure if we will undertake this or not. Is it better to relocate the fish when the water temperature is lower or does it matter? I've heard that fish kind of "hibernate" when the water temp drops alot. I really don't want any of the fish to suffer or become a casualty of moving. Hubby and I are still in the discussion mode and will actually view the entire pond this weekend.
     
    pondlover, Jan 13, 2012
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  16. pondlover

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

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    You would be better getting set up now in the winter, let the pond settle, move the fish in the spring, summer. It would be hard on them, to disturb them while it is cold and they are in the hibernation/slow mode.
     
    addy1, Jan 13, 2012
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  17. pondlover

    HARO Pondcrastinator

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    A fish's immune system is very low in winter, which is why you would be better off waiting until spring to move them.
    John
     
    HARO, Jan 13, 2012
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  18. pondlover

    Waterbug

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    When you say $3,500, do mean he's going to pay you or you have to pay him? Sorry, old joke.

    I'm a big fan of recycling. My last project was remodelling my home with nothing but materials purchased on Craig's List, Ebay and second hand shops. I spent a whole summer just buying used materials. For what it's worth I learned was recycling is expensive.

    Retail new costs
    --------------------
    $400 liner
    $500 two 6000 gph pumps
    $500 local rock delivered
    $300 Arkansas flat rock
    $20 Crappie and catfish, or free from local lakes and ponds
    $200 9" Koi (not sure how many) I guessing these aren't Grand Champions
    $100 skimmer
    $400 300 gal Rubbermaid trough
    $100 plants
    $20 per lily
    $0 waterfall
    --------------
    $2,540 full retail
    - 50% used value
    --------------
    $1,270 best case value
    - ??? tear down cost
    - ??? transportation
    - ??? oops, couldn't use that
    - ??? oops, fish all died waiting for new pond
    - ??? oops, didn't see that coming
    --------------
    $deep dark hole of despair

    The price I'd charge to tear down that pond would be in the $2,000 neighborhood and I keep whatever I can. The rocks would be left in the hole and covered with dirt.

    Rocks, are free for the most part. The cost is in digging it up, crating it, transportation and overhead. You're doing the digging, crating and transporting.

    I've picked up rocks for free off Craig's List. Dumpest thing I ever did. Gas, wear and tear on my truck, time, no where close to worth while. If they were next door, and free, OK.

    That $300 a pallet Arkansas flat rock...after you dig it out of that pond it isn't going to be Arkansas flat rock any more, it's going to be slime coated black flat rock. No value. And getting it out of that pond is going to be a nightmare. By slabs I assume big, heavy. Working in the bottom of a pond is grease on ice. Putting large dry rocks into a pond without damaging the liner takes some experience...getting them out, nightmare.

    If you do this I suggest plan B is to bring a sledgehammer and give the slabs some hits to break them into smaller pieces you can manage. Breaking them won't damage the liner but you have to be careful picking them up as they now have very shape edges.

    The chance that the hole in the liner for the skimmer(s) will line up in your new pond is zero. So the useable liner size will be less than current. Most people buy a liner several feet larger than needed. Filling in a pond to make up for being short on the liner, now that's a job.

    Pond plants reproduce fast (or die). So even a $100 worth of plants will normally fill a pond in one year.

    The waterfalls have no value. The chance of reusing that liner is near zero. Maybe in a much smaller application.

    The price I pay for used material is around 10% of retail for most items, depends on item. After tossing the things I couldn't use afterall, or were in worst condition than I thought, my time screwing around to get things to work, was it still ended up costing more than retail. I do it for other reasons. Many sellers get really mad and say you're robbing them but I'm not here to turn their problems into my problems. And I never force anyone to sell. They're grown ups.

    It may sound harsh but I think it's a reality. A reality I learned the hard $$$ way.
     
    Waterbug, Jan 14, 2012
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  19. pondlover

    pondlover Bogs are good for more than just your pond!

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    I think we've decided it's more than we want to take on. So we will just continue with our build. Thanks everyone for all your input. It helps alot to get advice from experienced ponders!!
     
    pondlover, Jan 14, 2012
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  20. pondlover

    CountryEscape

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    The pond is indeed beautiful, but the price they are asking is very high priced. At first I thought it was a good deal, but Waterbug is right, you are paying to build your pond ... TWICE!
    Why are they selling the pond? Are they tired of it, or did they buy property, don't want the pond? If they are just tired of it, they will wait until you get your pond built, to the size YOU want, and then buy the rocks and pumps and so forth from the buyer. You can then safely move the fish, if that is what you are wanting to do. Don't let them tell you the fish are worth $100 each, as they are not. If they were, they would have sold them for that. They are extremely expensive to move, and if they don't have an oxygen tank, they could never ship them. It's a hassle. If they can find local people to sell them to, that's fine.
    I moved 11 koi that I bought in July from a breeder 3 hours from me. They were 3" to 9", only 3 were the bigger size, rest were 3-6". The breeder told me to bring large coolers and a aerator for each. Look for them in the fishing dept at Wal-Mart, get the battery operated ones. They will provide the oxygen while you travel with the fish. You don't have to have HUGE containers to put them in, but bigger the better for the fish stress, since they are pretty large. the large trough they have would be nice to use, if you have some type of cover to put over it (netting would work) as they will try to jump during the ride. Looks like there are about 10 koi, so you could also move them in smaller containers like large coolers with lids. It can be done, but the water they will go into is the key. If you get your pond ready first and then transport the fish that would be ideal. Also, if you do end up doing this (for much lower price), bring back as much of their pond water as possible. That's where the large trough could come in handy, or 55 gal drums with lids, too. That way you would have "seasoned" water to help start your new water.
    Think about what you would pay for the rock that they have, then cut the price by at least 50%. After all, you will have extra gas to drive there to get it, loading time (man power or hopefully they would have access to machinery to carry and load ...). The pumps you can figure out value on-line, and again, they are used, so no more than 50% of new. Remember, they might have gotten them at 50% off at a sale! That's why used stuff you pay much lower price, unless it's less than a couple of years old.
    Lots of things to consider, but it's exciting to see it all in place and at least give you ideas. If you go to view it (or maybe you already did or decided not to), look for ideas for your own pond. You may still strike a deal with the owner. Just let him/her have some time to realize they are asking far too much to move the pond. Good luck!
     
    CountryEscape, Jan 16, 2012
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