Small trees/large shrubs for bog filter?


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I know there's a list of plants for bog filters around here, but wondering if anyone knows of any small trees or shrubs/bushes that would thrive in a bog. Would be cool to be able to vary the height of the plants I put in my filter. I'm not much of a gardener yet, so I have a lot to learn about planting.

I'm in zone 8b/Pacific NW. I'm sure that will narrow down options.
 
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Jhn

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Look into cannas, most of the varieties would do well in your zone and some species can get around 8’ tall. They also grow quickly In the bog, it is what I plant in there to vary the height of what is planted. Also plant taros/elephant ears, many of the tropical varieties may be a perennial for your location as well. They can get immense leaves and over 6’ tall. I have found a few that come back in my zone7a/b, but some like the blue Hawaii elephant ear I just treat as an annual and buy one every spring to plant.
 
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Because they could clog the filter or be difficult to remove?
Because tree roots can easily puncture your liner. But here's a rule of thumb 90 %of plants have it so there roots are only as wide as is there canopy branches. So if your tree is 4 feet wide above ground odds are its that underground as well.
 

brokensword

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a very large reason to plant shallow rooting, quick reproducing plants is you want the aggressive behavior. This behavior takes out the most nitrates. Slower growers don't do nearly the same job. To vary height, as noted above, cannas can get large. I have cardinal flower and it gets about 3' tall. Taro, as mentioned, can get huge; mine gets leaves almost 2' long and easily tops 6' in height. Yellow flag iris can get tallish--especially when flowering. In my bog, what I did was to plant 2 clematis; both are still in their pot, while sitting essentially on the gravel. This gives me height in the back.

I'd be hesitant to put anything 'woody/treeish' in the bog; roots being the biggest future concern. You can also incorporate a lotus; this plant can get tall, just ask @addy1 !

Were it mine, I'd just plan on planting any treeish plants OUTSIDE the bog in the landscaping adjoining. this gives you the look you want without the eventual headache.
 
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Because tree roots can easily puncture your liner. But here's a rule of thumb 90 %of plants have it so there roots are only as wide as is there canopy branches. So if your tree is 4 feet wide above ground odds are its that underground as well.
Tree roots grow out in search of water, no? They're never going to find more water outside the liner than inside. That said, I think you and everyone else is right that it's best to keep big, woody plants outside the liner.

I don't know that much about trees, but I know I have a plum tree in the backyard with large feeder roots over 20' outside the edge of its canopy. :eek:

a very large reason to plant shallow rooting, quick reproducing plants is you want the aggressive behavior. This behavior takes out the most nitrates. Slower growers don't do nearly the same job.
Good point.

Thanks for the suggestions, everyone. I have some research to do. If you think of more, feel free to share here.
 
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Because they could clog the filter or be difficult to remove?
Yes and yes. And maybe puncture the liner, maybe not - but definitely not worth the chance. While they MAY not find a better water source than inside the bog, they will still try to grow to their natural size, which may be bigger than the bog. The may also grow over the edge and cause you problems with leaking if the liner gets pushed down by an errant root.

Just some thoughts! And yes to taro or canna or papyrus if you're looking for tall, large, rapid growth. All do great in the bog.
 

mrsclem

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Thalia is another tall plant. I had one in a window box bog and it grew to over 8'. It does bloom but can't remember what the flowers look like.
 
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I was thinking about rolling the dice on a native currant/gooseberry of some sort. They don't get too big and are natively found in bogs so seems like it could be a good fit. And you'd get berries. Maybe this one? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ribes_americanum.

Anyone tried it? Could work as a marginal plant in the pond as well. Maybe.
 
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Maples and willows are particularly the worst water seekers . Aspen and cypress don't even think about them
 
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@mrsclem: Wow! 8 feet tall!

@GBBUDD: That's funny because it seems like every manicured landscape I've seen has some sort of japanese maple planted right up against the edge of the pond.
 

addy1

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Thalia is another tall plant. I had one in a window box bog and it grew to over 8'. It does bloom but can't remember what the flowers look like.
I have one in a lowes bucket in a shallow part of the stream. Kitty litter and a blue bucket with a ton of holes. It stays there all winter, very little of it under water, freezes and comes back every spring. Right now growing and yes it gets really tall.
 
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Again roots only shoot out as far as is the canopy on average and yes i know what your getting at i also planted a red bud right up close and personal but i also placed protection between the tree roots and the liner
 
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But as anyone who has had there sewer line get clogged maples ": full size" and willows are notorious for seeking out these lines and growling into the joints of pipe. and your talking dwarf species
 
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I'm one of those fools with a shade pond. Far right 30' clump sugar maple, middle 30'+ autumn blaze maple, left edge 25' ash tree. even with a 15gallon skimmer basket it still means lots of netting with a heavy fish net and tea colored water until the end of June, but when down on the lower deck you wouldn't know we had neighbors.

So far no roots directly through the liner however this weekends job is to find the feeder for the root growing though the joint between the skimmer and liner. (under the cedar slats under the stairs) pond was put in May 2013.
thumbnail_IMG_0293 (1).jpg
 
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