Stones in Koi pond keep falling


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Hello folks. Help me pls. I have a 1000 gal Koi pond and my big koi keep jumping over the 4-8" pebbles and knocks them down to bottom of the pond. Now I am thinking of putting cement mortar in between the stones to keep them intact otherwise it will expose the liner to sun and other elements.

Can I do that? or is there a better way to hold the stones together?
 
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Yes that can be done but the rocks have to be damp not soaking wet for the concrete to stick. Though the concrete can just fill between basicly just locking it in place . Another option is waterfall foam but that needs dry rocks to stick but it to can just lock them in place just not as well.
 

brokensword

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just give them a good stern talking to. The koi, I mean. :)
 

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@DMand
 
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This was 2 months back n if u see closely in the pic the pebbles are fallen n right now they are almost gone. The big koi kerps on knocking them off
 

JRS

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Welcome to the forum! I think GBBUDD gave you the best options. Hard to keep smooth round rocks in place on a vertical slope. Larger rocks would reduce the volume of your pond unless you could lean some flat stones up to cover the exposed area.
 
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I should specify a bit better then just saying concrete. I do use that term a bit to generally. I would use Motar mix that is 3 or 4 scoops Mortar mix with a scoop of portland cement this makes the mortar mix very sticky and easier to work with. The mortar will hold far better in a vertical fill with the portland then mortar alone.
 
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Nice pond!
That's a lot of stones!
Obviously round stones are harder to stack than flat ones, but that's a moot point as of now.

Round stones will obviously roll out of place very easily, especially on an incline. It probably doesn't take much to get them rolling. A nudge from a foraging koi will most likely get them going.

I wonder how much more water there would be for the fish to live in if those stones were not in there?

A bare liner isn't really that bad once the biofilm covers it.

I get the desire for a natural looking bottom (and sides) and all the nooks and crannies for beneficial bacteria to colonize.

I don't know if there's much you can do at this point other than removing all the stones. I think just deal with what is happening and once in a while go in there and collect the stones that rolled to the bottom.

If you drained it and cemented all the stones, that would be a complete mess. The cement would probably be bad for your water chemistry and by emptying your pond you will lose all that beneficial bacteria.
 

brokensword

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I should specify a bit better then just saying concrete. I do use that term a bit to generally. I would use Motar mix that is 3 or 4 scoops Mortar mix with a scoop of portland cement this makes the mortar mix very sticky and easier to work with. The mortar will hold far better in a vertical fill with the portland then mortar alone.
GB; mortar isn't waterproof. Trust me, helped rebuild more than a few chimneys with my dad (mason) once upon a time. Made cement aquariums that were waterproof, too. Cement ( Portland) is the better choice. And, I could make a very sticky mortar -- it's just a closer ratio of course sand to mortar that makes it that way. Plus, there's a reason they used to coat block basements with a cement coat and not mortar.
 
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GB; mortar isn't waterproof. Trust me, helped rebuild more than a few chimneys with my dad (mason) once upon a time. Made cement aquariums that were waterproof, too. Cement ( Portland) is the better choice. And, I could make a very sticky mortar -- it's just a closer ratio of course sand to mortar that makes it that way. Plus, there's a reason they used to coat block basements with a cement coat and not mortar.
He probably didn't realize the stones were under water.
I thought the stones were around the perimeter edging outside of the pond, then I saw the picture.
 
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@poconojoe brings up a good point . The bio film will need to be removed from the rocks for the concrete to stick. To get mortar or waterfall foam to stick even using a pressure washer will be a bit of a challange. You do have a small pond i would guess.

Yes i understand the stones are in the water. I can read occasionally. Doesn't need to be water proof there's obviously a liner. The sides are just to tall and steep . They need to drain clean . Then add the mortar/ portland. But if they go that far might as well re dig the shelves . Angle the sides so the rocks hold or just pull out the baseballs and buy a skid or two of stackable rock. I used flatish rocks in dead pool but they are not stacked as much as they are laying on the angle similar to what they have here but i spray foamed them in place. Its only a year old and holding strong. My last video shows this area pretty well its toward the beginning of the video
 
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Just a thought: I would recommend removing the rocks. They will probably end up doing more harm then good, and are already causing you some frustration (enough to get on here and ask for help, anyway). They also give the fish a lot more swimming space due to the insane amount of rocks you have; removing them would give the fish a lot more space in the already small pond (for koi).

If you're dead set on rocks, GBBUDD had some pretty good ideas.
 
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I'm a big proponent of any rock that is in or on the edge of a pond needs to be able to be stepped or walked on safely. The interior of the pond is no exception. If someone or something were to fall in, your stacked rocks would likely collapse if they were to try to climb out. You'd have a big mess and possibly even a dangerous situation.

I'd remove all the small rocks from inside the pond. It appears you have a shelf near the top - get some small boulders that are large enough so you can set them on the shelf where they are at least half covered by the water with some rock above the water line. That will help conceal your exposed liner and give you some spaces between them for marginal plants to break up the line of rocks. It's also more natural looking than a whole bunch of small rocks precariously stacked on the edge.

How is your waterfall held together?
 
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