Stop plants floating/falling


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Hi, I was just hoping for some advice.

Just built the first part of my first pond. Using liner, with 1 ledge. On the main part this has been successful. Few changes such as remoulding the top edge to allow plants etc.
even succeeded in getting a frog with only 3 plants after less than a week of it being filled.

However.. My main issue I have is that I have got some plants. The deep ones are fine, but those which on the ledge keep falling over in the breeze. I have been reluctant to use pebbles cause reading people have said this can add chemicals to the water? Will this matter if it's wildlife as I'm not having fish?
- What is the best way of stopping plants from falling, my only 2 thoughts were to repot the plant and add pebbles in the bottom to add weight, or put more rocks, stones and gravel etc to allow the plants to anchor themselves.
- is it really bad to include pebbles rocks and stones? It's a wildlife pond, and nature obviously has this?

Thanks for any advice so I don't have to keep popping out to stand them back up
 
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sissy

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I put a big rock in the bottom of my pot .No rock adds any thing to the pond unless you get dirty ones and you just soak them and they are fine .River rocks are good to hold up plants .
 

HARO

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I use old bricks to stabilize pots on the shelf. Just push them up against the pot, they soon get covered with algae and aren't obvious. Works well in a breeze, but after a hurricane you still have to set the plants back upright! Best solution, though, is to use large, but shallow pots, with a layer of stones (gravel) in the bottom.
John
 
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More weight in the pot will help for sure. Or you could use a lower profile pot - a pot that is lower and wider will be less likely to tip over. You can also remove the plant from the pot and plant it directly in gravel that you put on the ledge. It will root into the gravel and become quite stable. Or you could try bracing the pot with larger stones around it - form a plant pocket of sorts and drop the pot into it. I use everyone of those methods in various places in my pond, depending on the type of plant, size of the plant and the location in the pond. Is it tropical? Then I want to be able to easily lift the plant out of the pond for overwintering inside. Is it hardy? Then I will plant it directly in the gravel. I try not to make my pots too heavy if I know I have to lift them out to fertilize or re-pot. That's the main reason I want to get the dirt out of my lilies and pot without soil - those pots get HEAVY!

You definitely don't want to have your plants tipping over time and again! That's no fun!
 
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Oh, and no worries at all about adding gravel or pebbles or even rocks - not sure what you've heard, but they won't harm your pond, plants or wildlife.
 
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You might be thinking about information where gravel bottomed ponds are a good environment for anaerobic bacteria to form. You've already stated you're not having fish, so not a problem...and using gravel or stones, for planting , isn't enough to pose a problem.
 
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Hi, I was just hoping for some advice.

Just built the first part of my first pond. Using liner, with 1 ledge. On the main part this has been successful. Few changes such as remoulding the top edge to allow plants etc.
even succeeded in getting a frog with only 3 plants after less than a week of it being filled.

However.. My main issue I have is that I have got some plants. The deep ones are fine, but those which on the ledge keep falling over in the breeze. I have been reluctant to use pebbles cause reading people have said this can add chemicals to the water? Will this matter if it's wildlife as I'm not having fish?
- What is the best way of stopping plants from falling, my only 2 thoughts were to repot the plant and add pebbles in the bottom to add weight, or put more rocks, stones and gravel etc to allow the plants to anchor themselves.
- is it really bad to include pebbles rocks and stones? It's a wildlife pond, and nature obviously has this?

Thanks for any advice so I don't have to keep popping out to stand them back up
I have a papyrus that refuses to stand up with the slightest of breezes. I repotted to the square mesh type planters (with rocks as the first layer - rinsed of course) placed on my mid shelf and used a long zip tie on both top corners of the planter closest to the dry edge. I then anchored the zip tie to a big rock with silicone. Now when the wind blows it will have to be strong enough to take the plant, planter, and boulder all at the same time. Hope this gives you an alternative to consider or at least a place to start jerry-rigging a solution.
 
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You might be thinking about information where gravel bottomed ponds are a good environment for anaerobic bacteria to form. You've already stated you're not having fish, so not a problem...and using gravel or stones, for planting , isn't enough to pose a problem.
I think you are right on this. Searching forums about people's questions brings up lots of different situations so I thought it might be easier to just ask the question. Pleased I can now as I might be able to improve the structure now.
 
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Thanks every one for the advice. It's great to here the feedback and glad I haven't ruined the pond by the numerous pebbles that have already fell in.
 
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sissy

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Hate to say but since my pond is raised I made hanging window screen pot holders .I used my sewing machine to make them with the clear plastic thread .The window screen has a piece of long tail of screening that I just weigh down with a rock .You can see the rocks with the pots hanging over the side .It makes for a great pot holder and also keeps the roots of the plants under control .Great for above ground ponds
 

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