The bottom of the pond


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What type of rock should be used in the bottom of the water garden? I have both river rock and pea gravel and why?
 
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Can you clarify your question - are you saying your pond currently has both, or you've read both suggestions?

River rock is the way to go in my opinion. And you want a layer just deep enough to cover the liner.
 
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I agree with Lisak1, a small mixed river rock is my preference for covering the bottom of my pond. Larger than pea gravel, but not much bigger than 1" or so in diameter. And definitely only a thin layer - a couple of inches at most.
 

brokensword

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since I got koi, I put a thin layer (one stone deep) on the liner. Koi are basically bottom feeders and like to turn over things in their quest for food. When I had only gf, it was bare liner.
 
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Can you clarify your question - are you saying your pond currently has both, or you've read both suggestions?

River rock is the way to go in my opinion. And you want a layer just deep enough to cover the liner.
I'm ready to add rock to the bottom to finish off the pond. What I meant was, I have both at my disposal to use. My question is which would be best?
 
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What kind of fish will be in the pond? I like river rock, it’s smoother to walk on, and in my opinion, looks better. However, if you are thinking of putting plants in, pea gravel might do better. But again, if you plan to ever clean it out, river rock is easier to clean and get back in place
 

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Have both larger river cobble/rock on part of the pond bottom, as well as pea gravel in planting beds in the pond. Also didn’t start with a layer of pea gravel in the deep end of the pond but it is there now as the koi pick it up and spit out . Never really needed to clean either one, though.

You could do a mixture of both, so it looks more like a natural pool in a river/creek. As was mentioned as long as you keep it shallow (a few inches), you shouldn’t have any problems.

The smaller gravel will give you more surface area for bacteria to colonize, it gives benthic organisms a place to live/colonize to help keep the pond in balance, the Lower depths of the gravel can also support denitrifying bacteria(in low oxygen areas).
 
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Put large ones in, they will be easier to remove when you realize that you can't keep the bottom clean. A liner is difficult to get leaves and other stuff that blows into the pond off. Rocks make it nearly impossible.
 
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Put large ones in, they will be easier to remove when you realize that you can't keep the bottom clean. A liner is difficult to get leaves and other stuff that blows into the pond off. Rocks make it nearly impossible.
Disagree 100%. I mean, to each their own, but I am able to easily scoop leaves and debris from my gravel bottomed pond. Ease of cleaning is no reason to add rocks or gravel to a pond. And there are reasons why many believe it leads to a healthier eco-system in a pond.
 
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I'm going with bare liner... and a heavy dose of silt from the pea gravel in the bog that I didn't wash.

How big is the river rock you have?
 
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If I had gravel I'd use the river rock, about an inch big. I no longer have gravel, just a bare liner with carpet algae...but I used to have pea gravel and wished it was river rock.

I don't know the answer to this question. I wonder if having rocks to colonize beneficial bacteria on, or a thick layer of carpet algae, benefits the pond's eco system more?
 
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Yup - our gravel is about the size of a grape, if I had to compare it to something.

I also find the gravel makes for a good grip when I'm walking in the pond. Not sure how it would be to walk on bare liner though.
 
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Pea stone is great for planting but is horrible to keep in one spot. The fish pick it up carry it spit it out the females will spawn and both will kick there tails throwing it all over. And if you buy a vacuume for get about it pea stone is a nightmare you'll suck it up . So if you like the look then a vac is an easy way to pull it up off the bottom .

River rock again with a vac the smallest id go is 1 " and then I would mix in a little 1 1/2and 2 and some 3 or 4 inch pieces here and there this looks very natural .
 
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