Toppling, Top-heavy, Potted Pond Plants


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It's the time of year when some of our pond plants get so top heavy, that they start tipping over when it's windy. What are some of the quick and easy solutions you have come up with?

Thanks in advance!
 
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cas

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I have seen people use branches/limbs to hold their large plants up.
 
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I have a large house plant that I had to figure out how to support because it was falling over. I ended up using a shepherds hook, stuck it in the pot and tied it to the plant with twine. And then I hung a decoration on the hook so it wasn't just empty. It actually works well and I suppose you could do it outside too.
 

sissy

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if they are outside the pond tomato cages work and so do plant rings ,you can also by plastic or bamboo stakes .If they are in the pond it would be really harder .You could make a teepee and just stick it in the pot .All it takes to make a teepee is string or wire and make a teepee looking item stretch out the legs ans stick inside the pot edges .
 
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Thank you all for your replies, but I've misstated the problem--sorry.

These are potted plants in the pond, and they are toppling over, pot and all. The plants themselves aren't collapsing, but a stiff breeze comes along, and the plant and pot tip over. Hope this explains it better.
 
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HARO

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Yup, that's about it. A low, wide pot, something like a dishpan or an oil-change thingy. The wider the better, but they won't fit on the standard 8" wide plant shelf! A deeper pot with rocks in the bottom might work, but then you need deeper water.
John
 

sissy

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I know addy uses oil pans for her plants .You can drill holes in the bottom .I got mine at the dollar store and put rocks on the bottom and then the kitty litter on top .The weight alone keeps them from falling over besides the wide bottom pan .
 
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I have used twine to tie mine to nearby rocks. Wrap the twine around the pot then around the rock - just make sure you choose a heavy rock so you don't end up pulling that in the pond, too! This, by the way, is the main reason I worked to naturalize all my plants - I don't enjoy dealing with the pots! We have one potted pond plant left - a dwarf umbrella plant. And of course the lilies are in pots but for a whole other reason!
 
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I had bull rush, pickerel weed, and cat tails get too big and fall in last year every time it got a little windy. This year I split all of them up and gave the other half/ quarters away and planted in larger pots. I think it helped, but the plants are even bigger this year. I have had the bull rush fall in a couple of time only. That idea about hanging baskets and shepherds hooks sounds viable. I may give that a go next year and then I can remove my black milk crate "plant ledges".
 
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These are potted plants in the pond, and they are toppling over, pot and all. The plants themselves aren't collapsing, but a stiff breeze comes along, and the plant and pot tip over. Hope this explains it better.
I have a very simple pond edge, so I don't have any rocks to tie the pots to. Instead, we got some bags of rocks (they are in plastic mesh bags) and tied them to the back of the pots using cable ties so that the rocks rest on the pond floor. Now when the wind blows the rocks weigh down the edge of the pot that would usually lift. Not sure if I've explained this very well, but it has worked really well for us.
 
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Thank you all for the great suggestions.. I've got the problem solved short term with twine--thanks @cas, and will make the long term fixes when I winterize.

I'm curious about @Lisak1's suggestion to naturalize. Are there workarounds for doing this with a rubber liner.
 
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I'm curious about @Lisak1's suggestion to naturalize. Are there workarounds for doing this with a rubber liner.
Does your pond have shelves? We have all of our plants (except that one tropical that gives me grief at this time of year!) growing directly on the shelves in our pond. We have rocks and gravel on the shelves which allows me to tuck the plants between the rocks until they grow big enough that they support themselves. I add gravel around the roots to cover them and give them a place to anchor. I have several types of reeds and rushes, irises, lizard tail, thalia, arrowhead plant, obedient plant, bog bean, several sedges, a water buttercup, water celery, cattails, and marsh marigold all growing in the pond with no pots. So much easier than potting and re-potting and dividing and re-planting and lowering the pots in the winter, raising them in the spring, etc.

Edited to add: We learned the hard way the first winter that the survival of our pond plants is dependent upon the level of the water when it freezes. The first year we shut the waterfall off and when we do that our pond level lowers about 6 or 8 inches. The plants were all completely exposed and none of them came back the next year. The following year we did nothing different except keep the pond running which kept the water level higher and the plants were under the ice all winter - they all survived and did great the next year. So you have to know your own pond and how it functions if you hope to naturalize your plants.
 
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Does your pond have shelves? We have all of our plants (except that one tropical that gives me grief at this time of year!) growing directly on the shelves in our pond. We have rocks and gravel on the shelves which allows me to tuck the plants between the rocks until they grow big enough that they support themselves. I add gravel around the roots to cover them and give them a place to anchor. I have several types of reeds and rushes, irises, lizard tail, thalia, arrowhead plant, obedient plant, bog bean, several sedges, a water buttercup, water celery, cattails, and marsh marigold all growing in the pond with no pots. So much easier than potting and re-potting and dividing and re-planting and lowering the pots in the winter, raising them in the spring, etc.

Edited to add: We learned the hard way the first winter that the survival of our pond plants is dependent upon the level of the water when it freezes. The first year we shut the waterfall off and when we do that our pond level lowers about 6 or 8 inches. The plants were all completely exposed and none of them came back the next year. The following year we did nothing different except keep the pond running which kept the water level higher and the plants were under the ice all winter - they all survived and did great the next year. So you have to know your own pond and how it functions if you hope to naturalize your plants.
Great suggestions. Would it make sense to move these from the pots to the shelves when I winterize, or should I wait until Spring?
 

Mmathis

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From what it sounds like, I have a set-up similar to @Lisak1 but my plants aren't really mature enough yet to say they are naturalized, but that's the goal.
 
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