UV clarifier vs sterilizer


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i will be picking up some pond equipment Tuesday and was intending to get a UV unit. After researching the two different unit types, I am not sure which to get. My pond will have about 1800 gallons not counting water in bog and bio filter. Plan to have goldfish in pond with lilli pads. Plants in bog.
Thanks
 
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My wife is the plant wizard in my family and wants a UV unit so I will be getting one. I believe the bog will eventually keep algae out but the first few months may benefit from UV.
 
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Well just remind her that any algae you kill with the UV ends up in the system. And dead algae feeds more algae. I also question what other single cell pond creatures are affected by passing by the UV.
 
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So the output of the UV unit should go through the bog filter instead of being returned to pond? I will be very interested to hear other folks thoughts on UV. It was a part of my water filtration system on my salt and freshwater tanks. Don’t even remember why I started using them.
 

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I have 2 UV units. Got them when we built the ponds up to a decent size. Have not used them in several years. Let nature do her thing!
 
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Agree with Lisa, Mrsclem, let nature do it’s thing and skip the UV. It kills the phytoplankton in the pond and prevents establishing populations of it for the base of the food chain in your pond.

No real benefit of using one in the beginning other than for aesthetics, the green water you will inevitably get in the pond will disappear on its own. Thus, in letting nature do its thing you establish the base of the food chain in the pond.
 
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Looks like the only difference between the two is the speed with which water passes through the UV unit. Fast kills green algae, slow kills pathogens, parasites and green algae. So thinking of using a valve to divert a portion of pump output through unit for green algae issues but have the capability to increase flow rate is parasites/pathogens are a problem. Output of UV unit goes into bottom of bog so dead stuff feeds the bog.
 
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Well just remind her that any algae you kill with the UV ends up in the system. And dead algae feeds more algae. I also question what other single cell pond creatures are affected by passing by the UV.
On the other hand, if you can prevent an algae bloom in the first place with a UV unit you'll have a lot less dead algae to feed new algae.
Looks like the only difference between the two is the speed with which water passes through the UV unit. Fast kills green algae, slow kills pathogens, parasites and green algae.
You nailed it.
Output of UV unit goes into bottom of bog so dead stuff feeds the bog.
I wouldn't worry about feeding the bog with dead stuff, but one thing to keep in mind is that a UV "sterilizer" can kill the nitrifying bacteria that you want to culture in your bog. Better to plumb your UV so it is the last thing in your line before the water returns to the pond.
 
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I have a UV, but haven't used it this summer. I wouldn't hesitate to use it if my water was green, as our pond season is short. I wonder if it's more helpful on newer ponds that haven't developed their bio system ?
 
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A sterilizer is actually expensive to run and totally unnecessary in the average pond. If you have championship koi that cost 5 figures and up you might have a use for it. Sterilizing a pond with a UV requires slow flow and very close proximity to bacteria, so it’s expensive to buy and run. The light must penetrate to the nucleus for a certain duration. Algae are easier because the cells are large, so the clarifier is less expensive to buy and operate. If you are after the algae, a clarifier is enough. For string algae you can also use an ionizer that releases copper into the water. One of our members has also been successful in suppressing floating algae by turning up the power on his ionizer to the highest setting. The copper pole has to be replaced annually and costs about the same as a UV.

We have a UV and have used them for years, but I’m starting to lean toward a turbid pond as both a predator deterrent and to give the fish a feeling of safety. As prey animals they do not like being seen and stress over bird shadows and finger pointing.
 
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So the output of the UV unit should go through the bog filter instead of being returned to pond? I will be very interested to hear other folks thoughts on UV. It was a part of my water filtration system on my salt and freshwater tanks. Don’t even remember why I started using them.
I have a 55w UV light and I love it! the return it's in the plant tub I have no issue with it and I'm buying another just like it for me second pond
 
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I have one that was on only during the algea
bloom this spring then turned off. I agree with most that it has a place for that short time but nature and your bog will do the best job. I also believe It kills the good bacteria so counter productive.
 
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I used one for about a week, to clear up a green water issue. Worked like a charm! I pulled it out at that point, and haven't used it since.
That's the only use I can see for it. As far as the bacteria goes....the UV clarifier won't kill the bacteria on your substrate or any other surfaces.
 
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... For string algae you can also use an ionizer that releases copper into the water. One of our members has also been successful in suppressing floating algae by turning up the power on his ionizer to the highest setting. The copper pole has to be replaced annually and costs about the same as a UV.

....

Copper ionizers are not recommended for a pond trying to achieve a balanced ecosystem.
Copper ions are effective are eliminating algae, but are also lethal to invertebrate creatures and in sufficient quantities, harmful to vertebrates (fish).
Excess plant nutrients will still be available and if there is no algae available to uptake these nutrients thereby protecting the the pond's inhabitants, dinoflagellates will take up the nutrients, smother all submerged plants and substrates which will result a pond that has a orange/brown layer covering everything, devoid of life.
Dinoflagellates are even more difficult to get rid of than nuisance algae.

It is more advisable to address the source of the excess nutrients in the first place.

.
 
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It is more advisable to address the source of the excess nutrients in the first place.

It reminds me of how some people deal with health issues - feeling sick? Take a pill. Pills make you sicker? Take another one. And so on. And so on. Instead of saying "hmmm... I have a symptom. Let me see if I can figure out the CAUSE and correct it. Maybe I need to change my diet, or give up a bad habit, or get more exercise... ". Correct the cause and the symptom will go away.
 
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It is more advisable to address the source of the excess nutrients in the first place.
There is more to it than just having excessive nutrients in the water, granted that can certainly be a factor although you can have green water algae bloom in a pond, pool or a tub of water without fish or adding any kind of nutrients, and yet you can also have clear water that is rich in nutrients.
I have UV unit plumbed into my pond circuit although it's rarely plugged in. I can and will use it if I notice the water starting to get kind of hazy or take on a green tint, I'll run it for a few days the water will get crystal clear and then I'll turn it off. Generally, that happens about once in the spring but after that, the will water stay clear for the rest of the year, and yet, I have the same amount of nutrients in the pond as I did before, or perhaps even more. Still feeding the fish and they keep on pooping but the water stays clear after the UV treatment, so there's more too it than just excess nutrients in the water.
 
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I might be missing your point.
How can you have an algae bloom without excess nutrients?
I think there's a fine line between us being able to detect the excess nutrients and planktonic algae consuming them as soon as they are available.
 
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How can you have an algae bloom without excess nutrients?
The more pertinent and interesting question is how can you have clear water with excess nutrients?
I'm not answering the "how", I'm just stating an observation.
This is an observation that good ole Waterbug use to rag on about but I think most people missed his point too. He had a theory about why it often works like that (something about other types of algae producing a chemical that controlled the planktonic algae) but after listening to what he was saying and years of having ponds and observing containers of water it's clear to me that there is more to planktonic algae blooms than just the amount nutrients in the water or even the amount of sunlight a pond receives. Clearly, you need some sunlight and some nutrients, but there are other factors at play, otherwise, why wouldn't I get another algae bloom soon after turning off my UV light if it was just excess nutrients causing the bloom?
 

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