UV Clarifiers/Sterilizers - Opinions???


DrDave

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As for the 55 gallon drum bio filter, if you have a waterfall and hide it inside, it is invisible. No one ever notices mine until I point it out. It all comes down to your landscaping and abilities to utilize it. Granted, not everyone has the space to do it.
 
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I recommend you do careful research before investing, i.e size of pond, pump flow rate, how to plumb it, quality of product. UVs can be pretty expensive plus the cost to run it. My neighbor swears by his--he fought algae for years till he installed it. Now he has clear water.

I'm having questions about mine, particularly vis-a-vis plumbing and flow rate. Right now my water sucks, but it's early in the season. Eventually i'm going to redo my pond and probably go with a Dr. Case double 55 gal bio-filter system. Until then, I'm trying to figure out flow rate to maximize the function of our 57 watt Aqua UV ($300). I think the product is good, I just need to learn how to maximize it's function--I'm probably going to invest in a flow meter.

So, bottom line just do your research. Personally I agree with Pondlady--I think UVs are a necessary adjunct to have, but with proper, effective filtration may only be needed at times.
 

DrCase

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If you have a uv in your system ,Its there when you need it , you can turn it on or off when needed,,What ever it takes to keep the water clear..
D&RW i would save your $$ you dont need a flow meter,,just look at the outlet were it comes out and adjust your valve by the water flow , keep it simple
 

DrDave

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Graduate a bucket at 5 gallons and use a stopwatch or second hand on a clock. The rest is simple math.
Flow meters are expensive and you really only need to do this once.
 
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Last summer, right before hooking up the line, I did the measurement with the 5 gal bucket at the juncture before the light set up. The outflow was almost too fast but with my neighbor's help we did it X 3 and that's how I found out the output of the pump was more like 4500 rather than 4700. It would have been more accurate with a larger container.

Right on the flow meter. They're about $80 and I don't have the cash right now anyway. It'd be neat to have actual number, but then there's another place for a leak.

Since I found the pond calculator site, I redid the data input in the most conservative way and still have sufficient head to reduce flow at the light below its capacity. Today I'm going to take Otter's advice and shut the main line valve and run it all through the light and see what happens.

The thing about the pond calculator result is it's hard to believe the head is that "high" and I still have the flow from the waterfall that I do. The formulas in the calculator seem well done, but I'm going to look at each cell a bit more closely and find out who did the work, i.e. an engineer or a lay person.
 

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