Water flow meter


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Some of our members have mentioned that they use water flow meters. There are a multitude available for about $20-35 dollars. Suggestions are appreciated for a reliable brand and model. Thanks!
 
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Mmathis

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It’s been a while, but I ordered one from Amazon. Sorry, but I don’t recall any details, other that it seemed reliable. Knowing me, I probably went by product reviews at the time, but nowadays, those are often questionable.
 
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I think mine is Orbit. Works great as long as enough flow is going through it. It doesn’t register if you have the hose turned on to just a trickle.
 
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Thanks combatwombat! I suspected the accuracy is variable but it should provide 'close enough' information.
 

brokensword

...and not every pond in Michigan has a loon!
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I think mine is Orbit. Works great as long as enough flow is going through it. It doesn’t register if you have the hose turned on to just a trickle.
CW; have you ever filled the pond yet using your meter? I ask because if you're filling now with gutter water, will you have an accurate total for any future dosings?
 
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CW; have you ever filled the pond yet using your meter? I ask because if you're filling now with gutter water, will you have an accurate total for any future dosings?

Nope. I still don't know the actual volume of the system. I plan to drain, fill, and meter soon, though. I suspect its going to come up far short of the 11,000 gallons I advertise in my signature, though...
 
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brokensword

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no prob; just thought you were going to use the rain as a helper and doing so, you would not have an accurate total. This is the one thing I wish I'd done differently when I expanded; I'll have to hope my math is good when I do have to dose as I'm not going to empty and start over, not 7K gallons and not with all the fish etc. I never would have had a real accurate measure if I'd used a meter anyhow as I transferred my fish from the old side to the new, then had to lower the water level, then fill the whole thing up, so I was sort of SOL from the get-go.

I hear you can measure your gallonage using salt content but since I don't do that either..,!!!
 
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Nope. I still don't know the actual volume of the system. I plan to drain, fill, and meter soon, though. I suspect its going to come up far short of the 11,000 gallons I advertise in my signature, though...
If you don't have tender plants you can do this with salt without emptying the pond. You just need salt and a salinity meter. It should get you within about 10% of the actual volume.
 
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If you don't have tender plants you can do this with salt without emptying the pond. You just need salt and a salinity meter. It should get you within about 10% of the actual volume.

Thanks @icu2. I recognize your name from Koiphen. Welcome! I love your stream-flow pond. Such a cool design.

I did recently read an article about measuring volume w/ salt. Very clever. Will have to read through the steps again to make sure I really understand how to do it.

My pond is still under construction, so no plants at all, though I plan to have many. Maybe I can use the salt method now, and then let this winter's rain dilute it out before planting in the spring?
 
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Thank you for the kind words and the welcome!

Let me know if I can answer any questions. If you decide to give it a try and need a salinity meter to borrow I'm just over on the
Olympic Peninsula and would be happy to mail it to you. They're about $100 so kind of pricey if it's a thing you'll only use once,
although they're good if nitrites ever become an issue too.

As far as the rain and salt, it's best to do actual water changes. Salt being a solid won't decrease with evaporation over time.
But it only takes about .15% to get a pretty accurate calculation and most plants can handle .1% fairly well. If you have that
much time before adding them, I think you'll be fine just doing a couple good water changes.
 
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Thanks for the kind offer. I'll message you if I end up needing it. Would rain not count as a water change? Last fall when I put the liner in, the pond filled up and spent most of the winter overflowing with each rain. This winter, I will be collecting at least double the water as I have a downspout draining into the pond that drains a section of roof with about the same square footage as the pond.
 
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I don't want to take the OP'ers thread too far off track so briefly, if your pond is simply overflowing, the water is probably being
added and removed from the very top of the pond. Some of the dissolved salt will certainly be removed, but how much is hard
to predict. To be certain I'd be sure check the actual salinity when planting time comes.
One more caution... rain water is often much more acidic than tap water. Be sure to monitor your KH level to prevent the pH
from getting too low and crashing. The PNW has less of an effect than the east coast since our weather is coming from the
Pacific ocean as opposed to over populated cities... but it's still worth keeping an eye on. Just my 2 cents. :)
 
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brokensword

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Thanks for the kind offer. I'll message you if I end up needing it. Would rain not count as a water change? Last fall when I put the liner in, the pond filled up and spent most of the winter overflowing with each rain. This winter, I will be collecting at least double the water as I have a downspout draining into the pond that drains a section of roof with about the same square footage as the pond.
I'm not a proponent of putting any salt in the pond, ever. I'd do a salt bath for fish treatment but not in the pond. Plants don't like salts and even though you do water changes, some salt will remain. A ton of work to half change, half change, etc until you got the salt concentration down to negligible. Not worth it, imo, esp just for measuring your total gallonage. If your gage works from the pump, then let the pond fill and when you empty it of all that rain water, measure then.




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