Wetland filter freezing


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I found some questions on my topic but was looking for more information. Most people said they turn off their wetland filter for the winter. I will also have an intake bay feeding the wetland filter. Will the intake bay be ok turned off ? Will the fish be ok without the filter? Will the plants be ok with the filter off? Can I still run an aeration though the winter?
 
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I'm in northeastern Pennsylvania zone 6b.
It was the first winter with the bog and I kept it running.
There remained a hole in the ice from the water returning from the bog. At first I feared the water would just pour over the ice and drain the pond, but it was ok.
As extra insurance, my deicer was not too far away, but there was no reason to worry.

I run two air stones year round. For the Winter, I raise the air stones to about a foot from the surface.
I'd rather not send all that cold air down there where the fish are hibernating.
 
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There are so many variables to consider - how big is the pond? How deep? How many fish? How large are they? There is no one "correct" answer. One big consideration is how will the pond handle ice - as @poconojoe mentioned, you have to be sure you won't end up icing over and pumping all the water out of the pond. It is certainly do-able to keep the pond running, but you need to know what your challenges will be. Will you need to add water? Do you have an accessible source nearby that you can use in the dead of winter? Will any of your components freeze? Where's your plumbing situated?

More information would be extremely helpful. We do keep our pond running all winter so I can definitely share some additional tips if you think you might want to do the same.
 
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I'm in northeastern Pennsylvania zone 6b.
It was the first winter with the bog and I kept it running.
There remained a hole in the ice from the water returning from the bog. At first I feared the water would just pour over the ice and drain the pond, but it was ok.
As extra insurance, my deicer was not too far away, but there was no reason to worry.

I run two air stones year round. For the Winter, I raise the air stones to about a foot from the surface.
I'd rather not send all that cold air down there where the fish are hibernating.
Hi I started using a pond breather in the winter and I think that really helps. I usually keep one or two pumps going all winter and an air stone and my bog pump. I know you are not supposed to bother the warm bubble of water that settles at the bottom but I think a little water movement and gas exchange really helps a lot. Other than occasionally a small fish getting stuck in a shallow area that freezes my fish population does really well every winter. Still feels like winter today!
 
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brokensword

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Hi I started using a pond breather in the winter and I think that really helps. I usually keep one or two pumps going all winter and an air stone and my bog pump. I know you are not supposed to bother the warm bubble of water that settles at the bottom but I think a little water movement and gas exchange really helps a lot. Other than occasionally a small fish getting stuck in a shallow area that freezes my fish population does really well every winter. Still feels like winter today!
there actually isn't any 'warm bubble' at the bottom of most garden ponds; you need to be at least 10' deep and even then, other factors come into play, so other than the temp being near freezing at the top where the ice forms, the bottom won't be much difference in temps from near the top, no matter if you stir the water or not. Thermoclines exist mainly in larger, deeper bodies of water.
 

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