Wetland Filter


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The existing pond I have now I have two waterfalls and to bio filters which are oversized for the pond. The existing pond will merge with the new addition. As for size of the wetland filter I am trying to go larger but I have one problem their is a deck and also on the other size a cesspool which I cannot go near. The size varies from contractor to contractor on size of Wetland filter. Some people say 10 to 20 % of the pond size others say 20 to 30% here is a link which have different specs. I know the larger the filter the better.
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Idk...everything I've read on the size of a bog states a bog's surface area should be 30% of the pond's surface area. That's if you have a decent fish load. 15% without any fish.
My bog is slightly larger than 30% and I have a very large fish load. Over 30 fish (various goldfish and about 6 koi) ranging from new babies to huge koi over 10 years old.
My water has been crystal clear since adding the bog. Before the bog it was solid green pea soup.
 
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Idk...everything I've read on the size of a bog states a bog's surface area should be 30% of the pond's surface area. That's if you have a decent fish load. 15% without any fish.
My bog is slightly larger than 30% and I have a very large fish load. Over 30 fish (various goldfish and about 6 koi) ranging from new babies to huge koi over 10 years old.
My water has been crystal clear since adding the bog. Before the bog it was solid green pea soup.
Yes I am looking at another area around the pond to maybe ad a second wetland filter which will than give me over 30% surface. Also I may be able to expand the wetland filter on the other side by maybe 5 feet which will give me more surface.
 
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Thanks for this discussion. As Spring approaches, my optimism about FINALLY finishing my pond begins to return. Having the bog basics discussed again is good review!
 
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I am building a wetland filter. The size of the wetland is 7' x 12'. I used reinforced milk creates from a MFG. Each single milk create is tested to hold 3,500 lbs of weight so they are plenty strong to support the weight of the stone and gravel. I also reinforced the milk creates with PVC piping as you can see in the photo to even hold more weight. This is the way it will work. There will be a 6 inch 10 foot ABS pipe under the milk creates. The pipe has 1 inch wide x 4 inch long slits on the upper left and right top of the pipe every 5 inches going across the entire length of the 10 foot pipe. The water flow will be from the ponds intake bay using a 4000 GPH pump. The water will go though the (centipede) the pipe, up though the (Aqua Blocks) which are the milk creates. There will be 24 inches of gravel on top of the milk creates. 8 inches of 3 to 6 inch stone, 8 inches of 2 to 3 inch stone and 8 inches of 3/4 to 1 1/2 inch stone. The water will flow though the void space of the milk creates up though all of the 2 feet of gravel than back into the pond via a waterfall or stream. The pond wetland filter water level will be about 9 inches with plants planted in the gravel for better filtration. The cleanout will be the Rubber Maid heavy duty cans that a sump pump could be put down and cleaned out once or twice a year.

I have one question has anybody ever tried to make the wetland filter part of the pond itself so the fish can swim into that section? Most wetland filters are separate from the pond it's self having just a stream or waterfall flowing back into the pond from the wetland filter. The fish cannot enter that section. If the wetland filter is part of the pond the water from the pond will be above the wetland and the fish would be able to swim in and enjoy that part of the pond. The wetland would still function the same way, water will still come though the normal way though the gravel but now coming up and mixing with the pond water which would be 9 inches in depth. The difference would be your fish would be able to swim into that part of the pond because it would be part of the pond? Most ponds that do have wetland filters the fish cannot enter that section because it is higher than the pond it's self or is blocked off. If I was able to do it the other way I would use a water fall going into the wetland area from water from the pond to oxygenate the water flowing up though the wetland. That is just a thought. Has anybody ever tried it that way? Thanks
 

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Hey Pondfun, Do you have any closer photos of how the rubbermaid cans are attached to the distribution pipe?
I'm installing a wetland filter this spring using the milk cartons, but still looking for a good "snorkel" tube option.
Thanks
 
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Plastic green sewer pipe or culvert pipe half the cost of snorkels
 
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Hey Pondfun, Do you have any closer photos of how the rubbermaid cans are attached to the distribution pipe?
I'm installing a wetland filter this spring using the milk cartons, but still looking for a good "snorkel" tube option.
Thanks
I don't have any closer photos but the Rubbermaid cans are double. One inside the other for strength. These cans are the Rubbermaid Rough Neck their called. I used ABS corrugated drain pipe 6". I cut out a 6 1/2 inch circle at the bottom front of the Rubbermaid cans so the corrugated pipe could fit in. Here is another snorkel idea. Click on this link they use ABS pipe for a snorkel. I was going to do it like this for the snorkel but the pipe I had to purchase was 20 feet for a 14 inch or 18 inch ABS pipe and they wanted almost $300 this is the reason I used the Rubbermaid cans. Also on this link they do not use cartons but I wanted to because it was a better idea. But if you use he Rubbermaid cans make sure you double them up so they are strong. Here is another look at the crates.
 

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Thanks Pondfun,
The link isn't showing up for me-
Yes the large ABS seems to be quite pricey, and I don't believe there needs to be any serious structural integrity, so I liked the garbage can idea. I just wasn't 100% sure how you connected to the corrugated pipe. Good to know you just fit it in through a hole.

Had you found any links on guidelines for flow physics? I guess I'm wondering how big the "centipede" pipes actually need to be. They're only serving to distribute the water under the rock, so I really don't see why they need to be as large as the aquascape versions (13" I think).
My pond is a bit large and I'm going to need a wetland of at least 15x20 so I'm considering running 3x8" corrugated x 20' long, spaced every 3' or so. Seems to me that would be sufficient, but as others have used larger diameter I just wonder about the actual physics behind the "centipede" diameter. Obviously it also depends on the GPH through the system, but I feel like most of us are theorizing on how the water is actually being distributed as the pipes are all buried when it's actually operating.
I suppose if one started with the GPH you wanted to run through the system, (based on pond size and desired turnover) through the wetland, you arrive at your pump capacity. But it seems to me, even if you were up in the 8000 GPH size a few 8" pipes would distribute that flow pretty well.

Thanks
 

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Thanks Pondfun,
The link isn't showing up for me-
Yes the large ABS seems to be quite pricey, and I don't believe there needs to be any serious structural integrity, so I liked the garbage can idea. I just wasn't 100% sure how you connected to the corrugated pipe. Good to know you just fit it in through a hole.

Had you found any links on guidelines for flow physics? I guess I'm wondering how big the "centipede" pipes actually need to be. They're only serving to distribute the water under the rock, so I really don't see why they need to be as large as the aquascape versions (13" I think).
My pond is a bit large and I'm going to need a wetland of at least 15x20 so I'm considering running 3x8" corrugated x 20' long, spaced every 3' or so. Seems to me that would be sufficient, but as others have used larger diameter I just wonder about the actual physics behind the "centipede" diameter. Obviously it also depends on the GPH through the system, but I feel like most of us are theorizing on how the water is actually being distributed as the pipes are all buried when it's actually operating.
I suppose if one started with the GPH you wanted to run through the system, (based on pond size and desired turnover) through the wetland, you arrive at your pump capacity. But it seems to me, even if you were up in the 8000 GPH size a few 8" pipes would distribute that flow pretty well.

Thanks
The size of the pipe Is to let the flow of water slow down to let any solids/particulate matter settle out of the water column and work it’s way to the snorkel/trash can, where it can be removed as needed. Can’t remember the ideal amount of flow, but you want dwell timefor the water in the wetland filter, so the plants can do their job. So you aren’t usually trying to turn your whole pond volume over a couple times per hour through the bog.

Those trash cans need to have some structural integrity, the sideways push of gravel and stone 3’ deep may start pushing in on the trash cans, have seen it happen on the actual aquascape snorkel, which is abit beefier than the trash cans.
 
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Thanks Pondfun,
The link isn't showing up for me-
Yes the large ABS seems to be quite pricey, and I don't believe there needs to be any serious structural integrity, so I liked the garbage can idea. I just wasn't 100% sure how you connected to the corrugated pipe. Good to know you just fit it in through a hole.

Had you found any links on guidelines for flow physics? I guess I'm wondering how big the "centipede" pipes actually need to be. They're only serving to distribute the water under the rock, so I really don't see why they need to be as large as the aquascape versions (13" I think).
My pond is a bit large and I'm going to need a wetland of at least 15x20 so I'm considering running 3x8" corrugated x 20' long, spaced every 3' or so. Seems to me that would be sufficient, but as others have used larger diameter I just wonder about the actual physics behind the "centipede" diameter. Obviously it also depends on the GPH through the system, but I feel like most of us are theorizing on how the water is actually being distributed as the pipes are all buried when it's actually operating.
I suppose if one started with the GPH you wanted to run through the system, (based on pond size and desired turnover) through the wetland, you arrive at your pump capacity. But it seems to me, even if you were up in the 8000 GPH size a few 8" pipes would distribute that flow pretty well.

Thanks
My wetland is 12 x 7 feet the pipe under the creates as long as it is at least 6 inch or larger it is OK. I cut slots out on the pipe every 5 inches on the top left of the pipe and top right of the pipe along the whole 10 foot pipe section The slots are about 1/2 inch wide each. As for wetland flow rates Aquascape uses this formula for every large centipede ( the 6 footers) you use 1500 GPH flow rate. This is what they told me when I called them. I do not know if this is correct or not but this is what they said. So if you use 4 centipede's than you times 1500 x4 to get your flow rate. Here is a phot0 of the Rubbermaid trash cans. I doubled them up for strength and used stainless steel screws and bolts to fasten them together. If you look at the bottom you can see the ABS pipe entrance into the can. Also I put foam in the spaces connecting the cans so no rocks get in there.
 

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I second the trash cans are shaky at best to hold back three feet of stone. 12" i could agree to as theres not a lot there how ever every time you walk around your snorkel your packing the soil. The do have a 1/8 fiberglass sheeting that wouldn't be an issue in the bog i would wrap at least one if not two layers around the outside of your trash can then i could feel good long term it would not collapse.
 
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I second the trash cans are shaky at best to hold back three feet of stone. 12" i could agree to as theres not a lot there how ever every time you walk around your snorkel your packing the soil. The do have a 1/8 fiberglass sheeting that wouldn't be an issue in the bog i would wrap at least one if not two layers around the outside of your trash can then i could feel good long term it would not collapse.
The snorkel they sell is solid it cannot expand in the cold. I know of people who had problems with them when temps went down to 5 degrees in the winter and the snorkel cracked. This friend of mine used the Rubbermaid cans and never had a problem again. He had to dig the snorkel out and replaced it with the cans. When you put two cans together they are thicker than the snorkel they sell and expand when needed. They will not crush. You have two opposing forces water within the can and water outside of the can. If the can were empty yes than it could be a problem but the water will be the same level inside the can as the wetland filter. There are no moving parts or gravel to crush the cans once they are in place. They sell special water proof underwater tape.

Aqua-Seal Tape in Black
by Nashua Tape
You can wrap this underwater tape around the whole can if someone wants to. The cans are not in the dirt they are in the wetland filter the gravel is around the cans.

  • Durable, shatter-proof construction withstands severe weather conditions, including intense sunlight and freezing temperatures
  • Engineered for life and built to last, backed by a 10 Year Limited Warranty. I use these same trash cans myself for my garbage. They were hit by cars stepped on and they are still good.
  • Another idea if someone is worried about the cans crushing is to put another Rubbermaid can bigger is width and length and cut out the bottom of the can and put it over and fill in the void space with pond foam. That would really make it stronger. Just more ideas. Thanks
 
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The snorkel they sell is solid it cannot expand in the cold. I know of people who had problems with them when temps went down to 5 degrees in the winter and the snorkel cracked. This friend of mine used the Rubbermaid cans and never had a problem again. He had to dig the snorkel out and replaced it with the cans. When you put two cans together they are thicker than the snorkel they sell and expand when needed. They will not crush. You have two opposing forces water within the can and water outside of the can. If the can were empty yes than it could be a problem but the water will be the same level inside the can as the wetland filter. There are no moving parts or gravel to crush the cans once they are in place. They sell special water proof underwater tape.

Aqua-Seal Tape in Black
by Nashua Tape
You can wrap this underwater tape around the whole can if someone wants to. The cans are not in the dirt they are in the wetland filter the gravel is around the cans.

  • Durable, shatter-proof construction withstands severe weather conditions, including intense sunlight and freezing temperatures
  • Engineered for life and built to last, backed by a 10 Year Limited Warranty. I use these same trash cans myself for my garbage. They were hit by cars stepped on and they are still good.
  • Another idea if someone is worried about the cans crushing is to put another Rubbermaid can bigger is width and length and cut out the bottom of the can and put it over and fill in the void space with pond foam. That would really make it stronger. Just more ideas. Thanks
Here is a fun link how strong Rubbermaid cans are:
 
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i was just thinking even styro foam peanuts between the thrash cans could help out so when the wall starts to bend inward the peanuts would help to push back from the other can and lock with waterfall foam.

Whoops for got to send... yes i know the rubber made roughneck better then i would like to. no one who works in construction hasn't used those for a hole host of reasons. they are very tough.

I hope your right , we do not tell anyone they are doing wrong after all that's how this trade started with the rubber someone had and idea and went for it I'm sure people told them they were nuts. matter of fact some people still do saying what your pond has no chemicals you can't go swimming in that. So it's no so much a right or wrong but more voices of experience who have had or seen something work or not fully work as intended.
 
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Thanks Pondfun,
The link isn't showing up for me-
Yes the large ABS seems to be quite pricey, and I don't believe there needs to be any serious structural integrity, so I liked the garbage can idea. I just wasn't 100% sure how you connected to the corrugated pipe. Good to know you just fit it in through a hole.

Had you found any links on guidelines for flow physics? I guess I'm wondering how big the "centipede" pipes actually need to be. They're only serving to distribute the water under the rock, so I really don't see why they need to be as large as the aquascape versions (13" I think).
My pond is a bit large and I'm going to need a wetland of at least 15x20 so I'm considering running 3x8" corrugated x 20' long, spaced every 3' or so. Seems to me that would be sufficient, but as others have used larger diameter I just wonder about the actual physics behind the "centipede" diameter. Obviously it also depends on the GPH through the system, but I feel like most of us are theorizing on how the water is actually being distributed as the pipes are all buried when it's actually operating.
I suppose if one started with the GPH you wanted to run through the system, (based on pond size and desired turnover) through the wetland, you arrive at your pump capacity. But it seems to me, even if you were up in the 8000 GPH size a few 8" pipes would distribute that flow pretty well.
Here are the links again. Try them. One link is on the MFG test strength of the Milk creates the other is on the ABS pipe how to make your own wetland filter. Please note: When making mine I tried the chain saw idea they had. It is to dangerous that way and rips the pipe instead. I just drilled out the holes and used a utility knife to cut them out. The video shows them cutting the top of the pipe I would not do it that way in weakens the pipe. I cut 2 inches down from the top of the pipe on both sides make the slits about 4 inches long by 1/2 or 1 inch wide every 5 inches across the entire length of the pipe. Good luck with your project.

Thanks
http://www.bogfiltration.com/making_your_own_upflow_bog_filte.html
https://www.milkcratesdirect.com/blog/how-strong-are-farm-plast-milk-crates/
 

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Here is a fun link how strong Rubbermaid cans are:
I will say that I used a rubbermaid trash can for my bog upgrade. One for a cleanout/vault and in my bog v1, I used one to house a lotus. the bog v2 can I ended up filling with pea gravel and iris as the water was coming up through more than I wanted, so I put some resistance in the way. The lotus bog garbage can IS bowing in from the stone around it, but only on one side and indented about 4". I didn't feel like digging it out and reinforcing. You're using 2 so won't probably get this issue but I'm here to say water on one side vs stone on the other? Stone wins.
 
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I have one question has anybody ever tried to make the wetland filter part of the pond itself so the fish can swim into that section? Most wetland filters are separate from the pond it's self having just a stream or waterfall flowing back into the pond from the wetland filter. The fish cannot enter that section. If the wetland filter is part of the pond the water from the pond will be above the wetland and the fish would be able to swim in and enjoy that part of the pond. The wetland would still function the same way, water will still come though the normal way though the gravel but now coming up and mixing with the pond water which would be 9 inches in depth. The difference would be your fish would be able to swim into that part of the pond because it would be part of the pond? Most ponds that do have wetland filters the fish cannot enter that section because it is higher than the pond it's self or is blocked off. If I was able to do it the other way I would use a water fall going into the wetland area from water from the pond to oxygenate the water flowing up though the wetland. That is just a thought. Has anybody ever tried it that way? Thanks
That idea reminds me of the old under gravel filter we used in our tropical fish aquariums years ago. I still have one. Basically a plastic false bottom with lots of slits that lays on the bottom and is covered with that colorful gravel. If I recall correctly, air was pumped down a tube to the device.

The only downside I see would be lack of access. You would have to drain the pond to access it.
Noting that you really shouldn't need to access the bog itself since bogs are usually maintenance free.
I don't know where your pump will be located. Most likely submerged in the pond.
Obviously, the pump should not be permanently buried under there.
 
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I will say that I used a rubbermaid trash can for my bog upgrade. One for a cleanout/vault and in my bog v1, I used one to house a lotus. the bog v2 can I ended up filling with pea gravel and iris as the water was coming up through more than I wanted, so I put some resistance in the way. The lotus bog garbage can IS bowing in from the stone around it, but only on one side and indented about 4". I didn't feel like digging it out and reinforcing. You're using 2 so won't probably get this issue but I'm here to say water on one side vs stone on the other? Stone wins.
You have to make up for it by double cans one inside the other plus stainless screw bolts to hold them together. Did 2 1/2 yards yesterday to today. A lot of work.
 

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