What "bog" plants are easy to pull (when it's time to thin them)

Discussion in 'Aquatic Plants' started by Mmathis, Aug 30, 2017.

  1. Mmathis

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Messages:
    9,592
    Likes Received:
    5,432
    Location:
    NW Louisiana -- zone 8b
    I just finished removing all of the plants in my small bog, and after some work on the water distribution system, am going to replant. Looking for replacement plants that are good filterers, but that don't INVADE the bog, and are easy to pull/thin. Any suggestions?
     
    Mmathis, Aug 30, 2017
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Mmathis

    JBtheExplorer Native Gardener

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    Messages:
    3,496
    Likes Received:
    5,689
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Seems like every bog plant I have isn't so easy to remove. Getting plants out of gravel is more difficult than I expected. Blue Arrows Rush was a nightmare. Blue Flag Iris is sort of easy. You can cut pieces off to thin it. Still not sure if Sensitive Fern will be easy to remove when necessary, but I sure do love seeing it grow in the bog.
     
    JBtheExplorer, Aug 31, 2017
    #2
    Mmathis likes this.
    1. Advertisements

  3. Mmathis

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    Messages:
    33,214
    Likes Received:
    17,833
    Location:
    Frederick, Maryland
    Water willow, obedience plant, blue forget me not, water mint, all are pretty easy to pull.
    Yellow flag iris a pita, same with rush. The gamecock iris purple, pretty easy.
     
    addy1, Aug 31, 2017
    #3
    Mmathis likes this.
  4. Mmathis

    Meyer Jordan Tadpole

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2014
    Messages:
    7,177
    Likes Received:
    5,640
    Location:
    Pensacola, Florida
    The harder it is to pull, the more efficient it is at filtering. Easier to pull, less efficient.
     
    Meyer Jordan, Aug 31, 2017
    #4
    cas, JBtheExplorer and Mmathis like this.
  5. Mmathis

    Lisak1

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2013
    Messages:
    6,561
    Likes Received:
    7,363
    Location:
    Northern IL
    I was just going to say what @Meyer Jordan beat me to - the plants that are easy to pull are the shallow ones. The deeper rooted ones are valuable for just that reason - deeper roots! Keep up with them and they aren't horrible - turn your back, and you'll regret it!
     
    Lisak1, Aug 31, 2017
    #5
    Mmathis likes this.
  6. Mmathis

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Messages:
    9,592
    Likes Received:
    5,432
    Location:
    NW Louisiana -- zone 8b
    @Lisak1 I turned my back on 3 bunches of blue rush...... NEVER AGAIN!

    The iris (various types) I had planted were pretty easy to pull. Most of the other plants I had had gotten their roots entwined with the blue rush, so I couldn't really tell if they were a problem themselves.
     
    Mmathis, Aug 31, 2017
    #6
  7. Mmathis

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    Messages:
    33,214
    Likes Received:
    17,833
    Location:
    Frederick, Maryland
    The water willow makes a nice root mass. Like solid root fibers, but you can get it up with a bit of digging and yanking. To me hard to remove means using a pitchfork to get the suckers out, like the yellow flag iris.

    I do a lot of thinning in the spring while all is small. Make the bog almost empty then let it regrow as summer keeps going.
     
    addy1, Aug 31, 2017
    #7
    Mmathis and IPA like this.
  8. Mmathis

    bagsmom

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,015
    Likes Received:
    1,129
    I think the water willow is so pretty, too! The thin leaves are a nice contrast to other large-leafed plants and the flowers are very delicate!
     
    bagsmom, Aug 31, 2017
    #8
  9. Mmathis

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    Messages:
    33,214
    Likes Received:
    17,833
    Location:
    Frederick, Maryland
    I have it popping up in the stream, in the stream ponds, in the deck pond. Here and there, I let it grow. I did need to move some from the stream bed the roots were redirecting water flow.
     
    addy1, Aug 31, 2017
    #9
  10. Mmathis

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Messages:
    9,592
    Likes Received:
    5,432
    Location:
    NW Louisiana -- zone 8b
    Addy, my definition of hard to remove, as well! In fact, I was so frustrated that I was almost to the point of sacrificing the liner -- not really, but you get the idea. My nemesis was that darn blue rush that I allowed to sit way longer than it should have!
    .
    Part of my mistake was in NOT thinning out the rush on a regular basis. It was good to have it there for the turtles. And probably a reason I didn't thin it is that when the turtles come out in the spring, there isn't a lot of growth -- either with the regular plants or with the bog plants. The turts are vulnerable at that time and any plant cover is welcome for them. But I'll be more careful in the future and I'll stick a few artificial plants out if the turtles seem timid with lack of cover.
     
    Mmathis, Aug 31, 2017
    #10
  11. Mmathis

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Messages:
    9,592
    Likes Received:
    5,432
    Location:
    NW Louisiana -- zone 8b
    Totally agree! However, a plant that forms a mass of closely entwined roots -- definitely not easy to remove, but how efficient is it as a filter? I think what I meant by easy to remove is summed up by @addy1 in post #7: needing a pitchfork to remove! I don't mind pulling, tugging, digging, and teasing out some roots. It's those "pitchfork plants" that I'm trying to avoid, LOL!
     
    Mmathis, Aug 31, 2017
    #11
  12. Mmathis

    Faebinder

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2015
    Messages:
    1,173
    Likes Received:
    649
    Location:
    Hershey, PA
    What do you guys do to a bog in the spring exactly? You take out the plant and chop it in half or do you cut the root ends? I'm looking at my hardy hibiscus and yellow flag iris and I'm thinking they probably need trimming next spring.
     
    Faebinder, Aug 31, 2017
    #12
    Mmathis likes this.
  13. Mmathis

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Messages:
    9,592
    Likes Received:
    5,432
    Location:
    NW Louisiana -- zone 8b
    Usually, pull out excess plant growth. Some plants can be divided. I'm not sure about root-pruning for aquatic plants. But you do want to be sure your plants aren't "taking over the world" down under the gravel -- in that case you'll never get them out!
     
    Mmathis, Aug 31, 2017
    #13
  14. Mmathis

    Meyer Jordan Tadpole

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2014
    Messages:
    7,177
    Likes Received:
    5,640
    Location:
    Pensacola, Florida
    Forget rooting depth, think total root mass. The larger a plants rhizosphere (root mass), the more root surface is exposed to the nutrient laden water, thus the more efficient the plant.
     
    Meyer Jordan, Aug 31, 2017
    #14
    Mmathis likes this.
  15. Mmathis

    Faebinder

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2015
    Messages:
    1,173
    Likes Received:
    649
    Location:
    Hershey, PA
    Interesting. So doesn't matter the direction I cut as long as the total mass is trimmed.
     
    Faebinder, Aug 31, 2017
    #15
  16. Mmathis

    Meyer Jordan Tadpole

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2014
    Messages:
    7,177
    Likes Received:
    5,640
    Location:
    Pensacola, Florida
    Root pruning does absolutely nothing positive for a plant. Instead of having energy to support top growth, the energy must be expended first to replace the roots that have been removed. In a 'bog' you want root mass as that is what is removing the Nitrate and Phosphorus from the water, not to mention many other pollutants.
     
    Meyer Jordan, Aug 31, 2017
    #16
    Mmathis and Faebinder like this.
  17. Mmathis

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    Messages:
    33,214
    Likes Received:
    17,833
    Location:
    Frederick, Maryland
    I rake the bog, removing dead plant matter, leaves etc. Then take a shovel, hands, pitchfork and yank out about 1/3 of the plants. no real rules.
    The yellow flag, I work from the edges and cut out tubers until it is the size I want to keep it at, the small tubers at the edge are easier to remove. Sometimes using the pitch fork to remove/loosen them.
    Rush, pitchfork out, take a serrated knife and cut in half. I do not trim roots of any plant.
    Water willow I let it just grow, nice root mat. It is mainly in one end of the bog.

    Off and on I remove plants by yanking them out. Toss down the hill behind the pond. I attempt to keep my rock path open to be able to walk in the bog.

    I leave areas open so the birds can bath.
     
    addy1, Sep 1, 2017
    #17
    Faebinder, Mmathis and Meyer Jordan like this.
  18. Mmathis

    Lisak1

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2013
    Messages:
    6,561
    Likes Received:
    7,363
    Location:
    Northern IL
    @addy1 just described my spring routine - although her bog is about 5 times the size of mine! I just look everything in the eye and decide who's scaring me the most and cut them down to size! Irises cannot be ignored - they will dominate. Rushes can also get overgrown, so you want to watch those. I have some dwarf cattails - they are pretty easy to control. Trying to think what else - I discovered some arum growing in my bog the other day. That was a surprise. Lots of watercress. Some water celery. Both easy to keep under control. You'll soon learn which ones need the most attention.
     
    Lisak1, Sep 2, 2017
    #18
    addy1, Faebinder and Mmathis like this.
  19. Mmathis

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Messages:
    9,592
    Likes Received:
    5,432
    Location:
    NW Louisiana -- zone 8b
    What about: pro's / con's for these? Due to the small-ish nature of the bog, going to narrow it down to just 2 or 3 plant-types....

    Arrowhead
    Thalia
    Horsetail rush
    Pickerel rush
    Lizards tail
    Sweetflag
     
    Mmathis, Sep 3, 2017
    #19
  20. Mmathis

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    Messages:
    33,214
    Likes Received:
    17,833
    Location:
    Frederick, Maryland
    Sweetflag, 3ish feet tall spreads via tubers, smells good!.
    Lizards tail 2ish feet tall spreads via tubers.
     
    addy1, Sep 3, 2017
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.