What should I do?


Baz

Joined
Nov 4, 2019
Messages
3
Reaction score
3
Country
United Kingdom
My 8 x 6 wooden constructed pond is 8 years old and disintegrating ( see pics)

What would be the best course of action, bearing in mind I do not want to re-site the pond or build a new one?

An idea I had was to remove all the earth in between the skins and fill with concrete - I could the dismantle the outer skin and clad the concrete

Any other suggestions please?

Many thanks
 

Attachments

Ad

Advertisements

addy1

water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins
Moderator
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
36,136
Reaction score
20,748
Location
Frederick, Maryland
Hardiness Zone
6b
Country
United States
I think they mean the wood walls. I would remove the outer wood (skin) and put up block walls.

Welcome to our group!
 
Joined
Dec 16, 2017
Messages
1,540
Reaction score
1,726
Location
Ct
Hardiness Zone
6b
Country
United States
I don't know what size your wood is but i am guessing they are timbers 6x6 because anything less you probably would have failed long ago There's next to nothing left of the wood your showing. As far as concrete is concerned you need a very strong and solid wall for a 8" x 3 or 4 foot tall pour and i extremely doubt those would hold. not in one pour anyways . if you were to put rebar verticaly every foot down into the ground say 6" and say your pouring a total of 48" tall . i would start off with a 1 foot pour or less get the concrete in there to set up a day or two then pour another layer or what we call lifts. of another foot or less depending how bad that wood realy is. if. its as bad i as i think it is i would place new 3/4" ply wood inside the form/ existing bury the ply with the first layer of concrete and pour the concrete in the lifts untill you reach the height you want . i would go with 4 -12" lifts oh and at the top of the plywood make a clamp to keep the ply from bowing out at the top. 12" lifts have some pressure behind them but you should know real quick if it's going to work. Driving some 2x4 or building a quick wall on the outside could save a lot of grief .Anyway you look at it you have some work ahead of you.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Baz

Joined
Nov 4, 2019
Messages
3
Reaction score
3
Country
United Kingdom
Thanks for replies and suggestions - been away so apologies for late replies. This is how the pond looked after planting. It was a two-skin kit which was locked together with plastic "pins"with a supposed life span of at least 20 years. The company offered to replace the pond, but couldn't see the point in that as it would mean replacing the pond again after another 8 years, so we settled on a partial refund. The gap between the two walls is about six inches. The wood has rotted on both inner and outer. I am thinking of the the building block repair - taking down the outer wall and building up against what is left of the inner wall. The pond is lined so that would help stop the inner wall rotting any more. I am thinking heavy duty building blocks with foundations starting below ground up to about six inches from the top, cladding the blocks for aesthetic reasons. Would one continuous wall all the way round be sufficient?
 

Attachments

sissy

sissy
Joined
Jan 17, 2011
Messages
31,841
Reaction score
14,778
Location
Axton virginia
Hardiness Zone
7A
Country
United States
retaining wall block is easier for a homeowner to do .I used it around my pond which is over 2 feet above ground
 
Ad

Advertisements

sissy

sissy
Joined
Jan 17, 2011
Messages
31,841
Reaction score
14,778
Location
Axton virginia
Hardiness Zone
7A
Country
United States
I had to put in concrete block because the ground behind the pond is much higher plus I raised the pond liner up another 6 inch's after I got done with the rebuild .You can see that in my rebuild of the pond on here .I just filled the block with my clay soil and pounded rebar down inside the block holes .It has held up great .Even when the neighbors dog fell in my pond.You can see the space between the concrete block and retaining wall block .I used styrofoam for some insulation and to protect the liner .Ibuilt
100_7208.JPG
100_7169.JPG
 

Attachments


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top