What to do with these 2 plants


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This Soring I picked up 2 new plants for my pond at a garden center which were noted as Minneosta winter hardy. I didn’t however keep the tag so I don’t know what these two are called. My question is whether or not cold weather members know if I should cut them down to the plant base and submerge them as I did with my lillies and grasses last year or let them overwinter as-is
 

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The one on the right looks like a type of rush plant to me. I have a corkscrew rush in my pond and it's very similar to that one.

The one on the right looks like a chameleon plant.

I leave both of those plants where they are in the pond for winter. I cut back the chameleon plant after the leaves and stems die. I'm in zone 6 and I cover my pond and it never freezes. So it's not quite like your situation.

I would be afraid they would rot if you sink them into the pond.
 
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Yes, I agree with WaterGardener's identifications.

The first plant is a Blue Rush, perhaps a form of Juncus inflexus or J. patens. I found variable listings for their hardiness, but I think it likely that there are forms of Blue Rush that can survive extreme cold, especially if they were sold as such.

The second plant, Houttuynia cordata is fairly cold hardy. I found one reference that said it was hardy to USDA Zone 5a (-28.8 °C/-20 °F), which would put it on the edge of hardiness for southern Minnesota, but perhaps it can go even colder with choice siting and mulching.
 
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Evidently I have two rights today. That first sentence should say left, but I suppose you all figured that out.

Thanks Marck for that info. I am always glad to learn more about my plants.
 

brokensword

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Yes, I agree with WaterGardener's identifications.

The first plant is a Blue Rush, perhaps a form of Juncus inflexus or J. patens. I found variable listings for their hardiness, but I think it likely that there are forms of Blue Rush that can survive extreme cold, especially if they were sold as such.

The second plant, Houttuynia cordata is fairly cold hardy. I found one reference that said it was hardy to USDA Zone 5a (-28.8 °C/-20 °F), which would put it on the edge of hardiness for southern Minnesota, but perhaps it can go even colder with choice siting and mulching.
don't worry about houttuynia; it'll survive a nuclear strike right along with the cockroaches, cattails and Godzilla. Been trying to get rid of mine for 3 decades now...
 
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First one, grass-like, is it round or triangle stemmed?
Looks like a rush. I have the stuff growing wild in my low land paddocks. You can cut the green down real low once it starts to die and then leave it.
No idea what the reddish plant is.
 
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I believe the second is rather invasive. the blue rush not so much . you have a nice specimen there. You can subdivide it and make a mass planting of blue rush nice contrast to other green plants
 

j.w

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I agree Rush and Chameleon plant. I had a rush in my pond but not that color. It grew very large and I had it in a tall pot not big enough for it. Every time the wind blew really strong here the darn thing would get blown over. Had a heck of a time getting that huge thing out. If I were you I would plant that Rush in a large pot that can't tip over in the wind. See it below on the bottom left.
I also had Chameleon plant wedged in between my rocks w/roots in water but for some reason it did not like it in there and died. Had it in my garden beds once and it tried to take over the world! Got rid of it finally after years of trying. Keep it in your pond only if you can unless you love it so much growing everywhere!

IMG_7422.JPG
 
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