Where to get spatterdock (yellow pond lily) and watershield?


Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
72
Reaction score
8
Location
WA
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
I'm trying to find some native plants for my 2000 gallon pond which has been established about a year but it does not have nearly enough plant life, especially floating plant coverage. A lot of 'good coverage' plants won't overwinter here, and the ones that did (some regular water lilies) have been very slow to take off again and I can see they're going to be puny for a while. Last year, I supplemented with some water hyacinth, frogbit, and salvinia (I overwintered some of the first two) but both this and last year they're just too small and slow to repopulate during the limited growing season on a pond this size. I need something that can establish better in this climate (I have some other plants as well, some made it through the winter but are slow to spread, others (a lot) didn't make it, and I'd like to focus on the hardiest ones).

Two large coverage plants that are recommended for my state Washington) are watershield (Brasenia schreberi) and spatterdock aka yellow pond lily (Nuphar polysepalum). I realize these are invasive in some areas (maybe further south?) but they're recommended here by the noxious weed board. However, perhaps because of their bad reputation elsewhere, I can't find any source to buy them and I need some coverage! At this point I need something more 'invasive' that can handle the cold weather, and I'll just weed it out if it gets carried away!

Does anybody have some of these that they'd be willing to sell me by mail, or can direct me to an online or local source?

Recommendations for other water plants that are sufficiently 'invasive' in a climate that is cool most of the time but sometimes unpleasantly hot in summer for brief periods, are also welcome to help establish more plant life.
 
Ad

Advertisements

JBtheExplorer

Native Gardener
Joined
Apr 2, 2013
Messages
4,589
Reaction score
8,037
Location
Wisconsin
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
5b
Country
United States
I've looked for watershield in the past and haven't found it at any local garden centers.
If no one here can help you, I suggest googling the plant specie name followed by "for sale". If there are any places selling it online, they might pop up. Just be careful about the sites you buy from.
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
72
Reaction score
8
Location
WA
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
I did look online extensively already, but wasn't able to find any... watershield not available anywhere, spatterdock listed in a few places but not currently available or sold out.

Anybody on here already have an abundance in their pond and would like to sell some to me?
 

j.w

I Love my Goldies
Joined
Feb 1, 2010
Messages
28,504
Reaction score
17,093
Location
Arlington, Washington
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
USDA 8a
Country
United States
I don't have any but I have seen them in lakes and ponds around here at times. Maybe join Nextdoor.com and choose your neighborhood when you join. Then you can ask people in your area if they have any near you in their wild pond or lake on their property to share w/you. I belong to one and everyone is quite helpful for all kinds of things. Where do you live in Washington? I live up here in Arlington.
 
Joined
Sep 5, 2019
Messages
322
Reaction score
163
Location
S.E. Vermont
Hardiness Zone
5a
Country
United States
I've also been potentially looking for American Watershield with no luck. I think this is something that is going to require finding it in the wild and harvesting it with waders or a kayak - neither of which I own (plus I'm not any good at botany so identifying it wouldn't be easy). :confused:
 
Last edited:
Joined
Sep 5, 2019
Messages
322
Reaction score
163
Location
S.E. Vermont
Hardiness Zone
5a
Country
United States
From what I have read, the problem with Watershield (as a ornamental pond plant) is that it is phytotoxic and secretes chemicals that kill or inhibit the growth of plants, bacteria, and algae, killing off competing vegetation (and other pond plants) and potentially impacting the bacterial balance in the pond. You wouldn't want to put it in with other plants as it will kill them. I've been looking into alternative small surface plants, and have been considering American Frogbit (Limnobium spongia). You might look into that. It's native and safe to put in with other plants, and has a similar floating habit (without the toxic slime that Watershield has). Just be sure it's not Amazon Frogbit (Limnobium Laevigatum), which is highly invasive and controlled.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
72
Reaction score
8
Location
WA
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
Where do you live in Washington? I live up here in Arlington.
I'm in SW washington in a rural area, there is not much in the way of ponding here. I might consider trying to locate and request some as a later resort, it hasn't gone too well before.
From what I have read, the problem with Watershield (as a ornamental pond plant) is that it is phytotoxic and secretes chemicals that kill or inhibit the growth of plants, bacteria, and algae, killing off competing vegetation (and other pond plants) and potentially impacting the bacterial balance in the pond. You wouldn't want to put it in with other plants as it will kill them. I've been looking into alternative small surface plants, and have been considering American Frogbit (Limnobium spongia). You might look into that. It's native and safe to put in with other plants, and has a similar floating habit (without the toxic slime that Watershield has). Just be sure it's not Amazon Frogbit (Limnobium Laevigatum), which is highly invasive and controlled.
I did not know this about it potentially killing other stuff; it was recommended on a few sites about less-invasive natives suggested to use where I live. That does bear looking into some more, thanks. From what I understand you can identify based on the thick slimy layer on the stems which is not on similar plants, but I've never found any in person or seen it anywhere, only read about it.

I've tried both kinds of frogbit, they're not invasive where I live because they cannot survive the winter. I tried overwintering both kinds, neither survived outdoors (they died after mild frost). I took some indoors to see if they could make it inside to repopulate the following spring, and the american one did not survive, period, while the amazon one survived indoors with babying and now I have a few more this year. But they are quite small and since they can't overwinter here, they don't grow fast enough to provide much useful coverage, also the goldfish like to nip at their roots and I think it inhibits growth. Snails like them too. The american one provided better coverage because of it's size, but if it can't survive indoors or outdoors and it's not really a viable option (also was hard to find). The amazon frogbit will float/drift around the pond, but they grow better when their roots can anchor in my experience (which means a relatively shallow place, not most of the pond, and they don't anchor strongly enough to form a substantial non-moving plant area if disturbed regularly). They also don't seem to do well in strong sunlight, so there's really only one place they like in my pond which is both shallow and shady. I think they would do better in a different climate, somewhat warmer, assuming they are not allowed to become invasive. I do like them but they won't really get much foothold in my pond for these reasons.

I've tried water hawthorn a few times, but it always dies. Maybe it gets too warm in the summer.
 

Jhn

Joined
Jul 3, 2017
Messages
1,246
Reaction score
1,132
Location
Maryland
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
7b
Country
United States
Water Hawthorne only grows in early spring and late fall while the water cools. Once the water warms up it goes dormant until the water cools again.

As was suggested I would try to find someone with a natural lake or pond that has spatterdock, see if they mind you taking some. I wouldn’t think they would mind as it grows out of control.

Idk know how well watershield actually Inhibits growth of other Plants. I’ve seen it in natural ponds mixed in with lilies, parrots feather, elodea, mermaidplant. Is an aggressive grower.

I have a little bit of water shield in my pond as well. Came in on another Plant, Doesn’t do much, really It gets choked out by the lilies and lotus in my pond.
 
Joined
Sep 5, 2019
Messages
322
Reaction score
163
Location
S.E. Vermont
Hardiness Zone
5a
Country
United States
I've tried both kinds of frogbit, they're not invasive where I live because they cannot survive the winter.
WA has quite a few pond/water plants banned/on their QT list, which makes it harder. They do have a recommended list of plants to replace known invasives at https://www.nwcb.wa.gov/aquatic-wetland-alternatives-for-western-wa#altlist. I'm not sure if there is a list like this for eastern WA. If you don't have other plants you're really attached to in the pond, Watershield is a good alternative. I just wanted you to know that it could take over and kill out other plants (it may not, but it has the potential to). They also list Fragrant Waterlily Culivars, Nymphaea ‘Lucianna’, N. ‘Pink Beauty’, or N. ‘Hermine’ as good water plants for WA. A quick Googling for them brought up http://sonoranwatergardens.com/html/hardy_waterlilies.html, which appears to have those in stock. Other places may have them for less, that's just the first result I found, and I have not used that site so do not vouch for it.

Here's a map that you can search to find locations of invasive plants growing in the wild (which means if it's considered invasive anywhere, you may be able to find locations to collect in the wild this way - it's up to you if you find that ethical or not): https://www.eddmaps.org/distribution/

I looked it up and the Amazon (South American) (Limnobium laevigatum) one is now considered a class A weed in WA as of 2020 and is being considered to be added to the QT/banned list in WA even though it only survives in sheltered locations: https://www.nwcb.wa.gov/weeds/south-american-spongeplant

The American Frogbit (Limnobium spongia) is only banned in CA:
https://www.invasiveplantatlas.org/subject.html?sub=12814

European Frogbit/Eurasian Frogs-Bit (Hydrocharis morsus-ranae L.) is invasive and quarantined in WA:
https://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=HYMO6
https://www.nwcb.wa.gov/weeds/eurasian-frogs-bit

So is Yellow Floating Heart (Nymphoides peltata):
https://www.nwcb.wa.gov/weeds/yellow-floating-heart

And Australian Water Clover (Marsilea mutica):
https://www.nwcb.wa.gov/weeds/australian-water-clover

And Water Chestnut (Trapa natans):
https://www.nwcb.wa.gov/weeds/water-chestnut

It sounds like trying Fragrant Waterlily (Nymphaea ‘Lucianna’), (Nymphaea ‘Pink Beauty’), or (Nymphaea ‘Hermine’ ) may be one of your few legal options left as far as floating plants that offer surface coverage goes.
 

j.w

I Love my Goldies
Joined
Feb 1, 2010
Messages
28,504
Reaction score
17,093
Location
Arlington, Washington
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
USDA 8a
Country
United States
How about Parrot's Feather? It's a pretty floating plant. No flowers or pads but still pretty.
 
Joined
Sep 5, 2019
Messages
322
Reaction score
163
Location
S.E. Vermont
Hardiness Zone
5a
Country
United States
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Sep 5, 2019
Messages
322
Reaction score
163
Location
S.E. Vermont
Hardiness Zone
5a
Country
United States
Walker Avenue Nursery appears to have had Spadderdock/Rocky mountain pond-lily (Nuphar lutea ssp polysepala/Nuphar polysepala) in stock in 2019. Maybe give them a call (707-585-7865) or email ((e-mail address removed))? It appears that Nuphar polysepala is an alternate spelling for Nuphar polysepalum. It looks like it's the same thing to me. But call them and ask if they have any available this year as they only have last year's catalog up.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
72
Reaction score
8
Location
WA
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
I kind of wish the frogbit would survive here but it went fast when it got cold, even though it was a fairly mild winter last winter. I do have several kinds of water lilies but they have been quite slow to grow. And yes, unfortunately a lot of plants especially floating plants are banned in WA. Unfortunately it appears that Walker Nursery doesn't sell directly, they sell to garden centers in CA.

There's at least two versions of spatterdock I've found, one of them has much smaller leaves and flowers, but there may be more versions than that. The ones I've seen in person in the past had very large leaves and flowers which would be preferable for coverage. It just doesn't seem anyone selling to the public has them in stock that I can find. It's not considered invasive here, perhaps that's why I wasn't able to find it on the invasive species in the wild link, but I thought perhaps in another area where it is invasive people will be trying to get rid of it in their pond and willing to cut off some tubers to sell.

I have a little bit of water shield in my pond as well. Came in on another Plant, Doesn’t do much, really It gets choked out by the lilies and lotus in my pond.
I don't know how much you have, but if you'd like to share some of it I'd take you up on it :) especially since it doesn't seem to be inhibiting your other plants much.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top