Why does a wooden frame make fish eat duckweed?


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This is my first ever post on this forum and I should come clean and say I don’t have a pond myself. I am posting this on behalf of my father who is in his 80s and very much a technophobe who is not online. He has a pond in his garden in Bedford in the UK and he has observed a phenomenon that he thinks is weird and would like some explanation. I’m hoping someone here can help.

The pond is well established (20 years or more). It is roughly 2m by 1.5m and maybe 0.5m deep. It has a population of an unknown number of fish (goldfish/generic carp - I’m no fish expert!), probably over 100 of them. Also, the pond is prone to duckweed, which is the basis for this post. My dad periodically removes duckweed from the pond but finds it comes out with a host of insect life that he prefers to stay in the pond. He has tried a few ways to achieve this, but recently tried a new method. He made a square wooden frame from some leftover scraps of wooden batten, floated it on the pond and put the duckweed inside the frame. Then he left it overnight, hoping most of the insect life would move out so he could remove the duckweed the next day. But when he returned the next day the duckweed had completely disappeared. He assumed it had been eaten, or maybe the frame somehow caused it to sink. He repeated this a few times and determined the duckweed was being eaten by the fish. BUT the fish did not eat the duckweed under normal circumstances without a frame, or at least not in any significant amounts. So it seems constraining the duckweed inside the frame makes it MUCH more appealing to the fish. So much so that they ate all of it overnight. So we would like to know:

1) Has anyone else observed this behaviour or anything similar?
2) Can anyone explain it?

thanks for reading and for any info!
 
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No clue, I could just toss handfuls into my pond and the fish ate every piece. I no longer have goldfish, but I have plenty of duckweed, which I give to friends for their ponds, and their fish just eat it. It could be the novelty of it being packed together made them interested in it, or it may just be in a location they have access to now.
 

mrsclem

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Maybe they realize that it will be removed or that it is special and is being kep from them. Forbidden fruit!
 

Mmathis

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Good question, but I don’t have an answer. If he can, maybe putting up a trail-cam over a few night could help solve the mystery.
 
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my guess is the boxed in area prevented filimentaous algea from growing or vice versa the lack of movement allowed algae to grow in that area only.
 
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This is my first ever post on this forum and I should come clean and say I don’t have a pond myself. I am posting this on behalf of my father who is in his 80s and very much a technophobe who is not online. He has a pond in his garden in Bedford in the UK and he has observed a phenomenon that he thinks is weird and would like some explanation. I’m hoping someone here can help.

The pond is well established (20 years or more). It is roughly 2m by 1.5m and maybe 0.5m deep. It has a population of an unknown number of fish (goldfish/generic carp - I’m no fish expert!), probably over 100 of them. Also, the pond is prone to duckweed, which is the basis for this post. My dad periodically removes duckweed from the pond but finds it comes out with a host of insect life that he prefers to stay in the pond. He has tried a few ways to achieve this, but recently tried a new method. He made a square wooden frame from some leftover scraps of wooden batten, floated it on the pond and put the duckweed inside the frame. Then he left it overnight, hoping most of the insect life would move out so he could remove the duckweed the next day. But when he returned the next day the duckweed had completely disappeared. He assumed it had been eaten, or maybe the frame somehow caused it to sink. He repeated this a few times and determined the duckweed was being eaten by the fish. BUT the fish did not eat the duckweed under normal circumstances without a frame, or at least not in any significant amounts. So it seems constraining the duckweed inside the frame makes it MUCH more appealing to the fish. So much so that they ate all of it overnight. So we would like to know:

1) Has anyone else observed this behaviour or anything similar?
2) Can anyone explain it?

thanks for reading and for any info!
Hmmmmm..... They like a boxed lunch? :unsure:
 
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yuck ...... yuck... :alien:
 
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j.w

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1600214505093.gif
@Dadpond22
My fish love the duckweed. I throw it in and gone the next day! No clue on this wooden experiment thing.
 

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