Zone 5

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Anon, Jan 14, 2018.

  1. Anon

    Anon

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2018
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    2
    Does anyone know of any zone 5 plants that would be good for amphibians? I would like to promote egg laying, but I can’t find any information on zone 5 marginals. I also don’t have any pond stores near my house.

    Thanks!
     
    Anon, Jan 14, 2018
    #1
    JBtheExplorer likes this.
    1. Advertisements

  2. Anon

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    Messages:
    33,200
    Likes Received:
    17,811
    Location:
    Frederick, Maryland
    addy1, Jan 14, 2018
    #2
    Anon and MoonShadows like this.
    1. Advertisements

  3. Anon

    JBtheExplorer Native Gardener

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    Messages:
    3,496
    Likes Received:
    5,689
    Location:
    Wisconsin

    Any time I see amphibian eggs in the wild, they're usually in areas of sedges or other thick-growing plants, likely as a way to protect them from fish. I grow Smooth Black Sedge in my pond. Haven't had any amphibian eggs in it, but it does look great all season long and can fill in quickly.
     
    JBtheExplorer, Jan 14, 2018
    #3
  4. Anon

    zeuspaul

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2017
    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    35
    Location:
    San Diego
    What kind of frogs do you have? I assume you are referring to native frogs? The native frogs that come to my ponds are Baja California tree frogs. They are small, about 1 1/2 inches. I usually find the eggs in shallow water on small branches or twigs or anything that floats in the water. They also show up in any saucer or bowl left outside that collects water. My challenge isn't the eggs, it is providing habitat for the young frogs and adults.
     
    zeuspaul, Jan 14, 2018
    #4
    Anon likes this.
  5. Anon

    Anon

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2018
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    2
    I have leopard, bull, green, and green tree frogs. I also want to attract Eastern toads, sported salamanders, and tiger salamanders.
     
    Anon, Jan 14, 2018
    #5
  6. Anon

    zeuspaul

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2017
    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    35
    Location:
    San Diego
    That sounds like a challenging project. What size is the pond? You are going to need a lot of plants, rocks, logs and various places to hide in and out of the pond.

    The bullfrogs may present a problem. They will probably snack on the tree frogs.
     
    zeuspaul, Jan 17, 2018
    #6
  7. Anon

    Anon

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2018
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    2
    Ok, I’ll try to keep the bull frogs away. The pond is an irregular oval shape that is around 4x2.5
     
    Anon, Jan 20, 2018
    #7
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.